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October 24, 1928 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-24

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1923

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1928

-C-

-. _ t . _ _ _ - _ i

ished every morning except Monday
the Universit year by the Board in
I of Student Publications,
ber of Western Conference Editorial
tion.
Associated Press is exclusively en-
o the use for republication of all news
:hes credited to it or not otherwise
d in this paper and t.e local news pub-
herein.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
;an, as second class matter. Special rate
toage granted by Third Assistant Post-
General.
cription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
es: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
treet.
es: Editorial, 4925; Busines,, sta,.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
. ........ Paul J. Kern
ditor...............Nelson J. Smith
Editor.........Richard C. Kurvink
Editor ..:.......... Morris Quinn
a' Editor.. ......Sylvia S. Stone
Michigan Weekly.. J. Stewart.ooer
and Drama ..........R .Ake
nt City Editor.. Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
:e N. Edelson 'Charles S. Monroe
E, flowell ;Pierce Roo-mnberg
1j Kline George E Simons
George C Tilley
Reporters

it T. Adams
ri Alexander
her Anderson
A. Askren
tram Askwith
ise Behymer
hur Bernstein
on C. Bovee
be] Charles
R. Chubb
nk 2. Cooper
len Domine
iglas Edwards
borg Egeland
ert J. Feldman
jorie Folmer
ram Gentrv
wrence fHartwig
hard Jung
rle R. Kaufman
h Kelsey
nald E. Layman

C A. Lewis
Marian MacDonald
Henry Merry
N. S. Pickard
Victor Rabinowitz
Anne Schell
Rachel Shearer
Robert Silbar
Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
Arthur R. Strubel
..Edith Thomas
Beth Valentine
Gurney Williams
Walter Wilds
George E. Wohlgemuth
Robert Woodroofe
Joseph A. Russell
Cadwell Swanson
A: Stewart
Edward L. Warner Jr.
Cleland Wyllie

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Manager.
Advertising ..............:..Alex K. Scherer
Advertising...............A. James Jordan
Advertising............CrW. ame
as-Crl W.Hammer
Service...........Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation..............George S. Bradley
Accounts..........Lawrence E. Waikey
Publications...........Ray M. Hofelich

ing Binzer
nald Blackstone
ry Chase
nette Dale
mior Davis
sie Egeland
en Geer
n Goldberg
per Halverson
rge Hamilton
nes Herwiga
Wal

Assistants
Jack Horwich
Dix Humphrey
Marion Kerr
Lillian Kovinsky
Bernard Larson
Leonard Littlejohn
Hllister Mabley'
Jack Rose
Carl F. Schemm
Sherwood Upton
Marie .Wellstead
ter Yeagley

IDENTIFICATION
Although homely persons on
campus may rebel at the idea, the
time has come whereby students in
the University should have more
complete means of identifying
themselves as members of certain
classes. Recent methods of check-
ing class members in elections have
proven to be faulty, even if
they did greatly improve another
situation, and the use of identifi-
cation cards, bearing the owner's
picture and issued by the univer-
sity, has greatly aided matters at
many other schools and colleges in
this country.
As a suggestion, these cards
should be issued by the University
to every student who enrolls, and
should be used as means of identi-
fication at athletic contests, class
and campus elections, and other
student affairs, in place of the
treasurer's certificate. The card
should bear the stamp of the Uni-
versity, a likeness of the person to
whom issued, address, class, and
other necessary information to
prove that the bearer is the same
as the person to whom issued.
It is well known that athletic
coupon books are used often by
many besides the owner. Dupi-
cate voting in class elections is too
well known to be discussed. Other
events arise where a means of posi-
tive identification is necessary.
Other universities are now using
the identification card plan with
success. The card is as sure a
means of spot identity as any of-
fered. This University, especially
in the light of present affairs,
would do well to take steps to adopt
such a means of identifying its
std dents and thus eliminating
much trouble and misuse of other
names.
Evidently Michigan is not the
only school which is having diffi-
culties in class elections. At the
University of Colorado thirteen
students, either freshmen or
juniors, will be dealt with by a
board of elections because forty-
five illegal votes were cast in a
recent sophomore election.
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to beabrief,
confining themselves to less than 300
words it possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be rgearded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
RUM AND ROME
There came into our hands re-
cently a copy of The Fellowship
Forum, purporting to have more
than a million' readers, with the
following blazoned forth in 120-
point type, two inches high, "Rum-
Rome Party To Be Crushed," this
in 36-point bold-face, "Romanist
Predicts An 'Over-Night Change' of
American to Romanism 'Early in
Smith's Administration' and
"Protestant America Will Not Per-
mit Smith and The Pope to Put A
Bartender's Apron onUncle Sam,"
and this, "Election of Smith Seen
As Great Triumph For Pope
Throughout World."
To say that such a flagrantly
outrageous attempt to fan into
flame the ashes of religious war-
fare and arouse all the dark pas-
sions of prejudice and intolerance

is condoned by Republicans wouldf
be futile. And yet former Senator
Newell Sanders, introducing Borah
at Nashville, said, "Tennessee is a
Protestant state andj wants a Pro-
testant President," and Borah, al-
most in his first words, said, "Sen-
ator Sanders has made my speech."
This by the way is the same
Borah who is silent now on Repub-
lican corruption, and who declared
in 1919. that Hoover was unworthy
to be entrusted with $100,000,000,
and that he was a violator of the
statute laws and the constitution.

i yD OSLL
Today the sophomore lits will go
To ballot at the sophomore polls-
We men of thirty freely give
This sound advice through Toasted
Rolls.
Remember, when your man's
behind,
A sportsman never gives up hope;
Approach yourfriends on the
Student council-
Demand that they recount the vote.
Your opponent may be way ahead-
Ahead by forty votes or more-
But recounts show that twenty,
ballots
Were added on the wrong man's
score.
Several scattered votes, you know,
Will often win or lose a race-
Scattered between the voting room
And the Student council counting
place.
And sometimes ballots in the boxes
Change their names-determine
the winner
By ghostly, supernatural means
While councilmen are eating
dinner.
But nobody cares about class
elections-
How inanely futile to care!
Washtenaw wins. Was it Shakes-
speare said,
"Fair is foul, and foul is fair?"
Then vote, you men of thirty-one
With carefree hearts and gaily-
Washtenaw may run the council
But State Street has The Daily.
Yellit.
0- -o
[ CAMPUS CHATTER [
0- _-o
More than one-half the students
who went to the Ohio game have
returned to Ann Arbor, and a few
have already re-entered school.
With Haliburton, Leacock,
Luckner, and others coming, local
autograph hounds are filling their
fountain pens and laying in a good
supply of brass.
SEVERAL EXCEPTIONS have
been taken to recent editorials in
The Daily, the management is
happy to announce. Circulation
figures continue to climb.-(advt.
PROFESSOR PILLSBURY of the
psychology department has bought
a "what-not" at last, after years of
auto-suggestion.
Several young men made social
calls at local sorority houses, last
week-end. Lucky girls, say we.
. .. Remember the sophomore lit
elections today! Exercise your
privileges!
President Little, well-known
part-time resident of this muni-
cipality made a speech the other

day in Canada. Ah, ah, Prexy!
TATLER.

Music And Drama

I

THIS AFTERNOON: In Hill
Auditorium, Sr. Fernando
Germani, visiting Italian or-
ganist, in recital, at 4:15
o'clock.
TONIGHT: In School of Music
Auditorium, Dalies Franz,
pianist, will give a concert,
beginning at 8:15 o'clock.
* * *
OPERA "BREAK"

Amid a fanfare of more or less
furtive publicity the Mimes boys
have for the past few weeks been
working themselves up to the point_
where finally they feel justified in
announcing that there will be a
Union Opera, titled, beautifully,
enough, "Rainbow's End." Having
used everything in the way o)
working-titles, from "Ragtime
Cowboy Joe," to "The Feet Coms
In," the general tenormo f.this
year's extravaganza of colo :d
athletes' sweat is to the cf < t th3t;
there is a West, and that inthis
West things happen which y'd
never breath to your mother excep
over the glittering screen of foot
lights.
But the show is not naughty. It
is really a departure, and quite a
nice one. The story deals with a
group of traveling players, Jitney
players, who travel and travel and
travel over the hot burning sands
until the parting of a mesa-or
mesquite, or mescal, take your
choice-clump! Well anyhow, the
clump parts and there is a long-lost
college friend. Strange things do
happen in the desert. It seems
there was also a college girl, who
had been intimate-in a collegiate
way, of course-with some one,
maybe the man behind the clump,
so of course there are complica-
tions, all sung to the tune of "Don't
Send My Boy to Harvard" But
everything irons itself out, as it
will you know, in a college show,
and the opus closes in a riot of
color, and with sand in your eyes
from that infernally burning desert.
Everyone has been working very'
hard with this embryo opera. It is
shrowded, almost embalmed, in
secrecy, and the machinations of
the choruses and the cast and the
musicians and so on, are so
nefarious that special precautions
have been taken to guard the pub-,
lic from undue shock-until the
opening night. But then it will be
discovered that Michigan has again
done something new in the way of
collegiate comic opera, and glory
will gather and gather, along with
the alumni, at the show-points
along the itinerary of the Opera
Special train.
The route planned includes such
beauty spots 'as Philadelphia, New
York, Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland.
Last year New York was not visit-
ed, which may explain why vital:
statistics in that city took such a
drop during the holiday season. In
Michigan the troupe will stop at
Lansing, Grand .Rapids, Saginaw,
Kalamazoorand other cities of his-
toric as well as aesthetic interest.
Someone with a sense of humor
has assigned credit for the show
to Hugh Claney and David B.
Hempstead, as authors, and to Ed-
ward Heyman, William Watkins,
and William "Bud" Lewis for inci-
dental musical effects.
Thee Ann Arbor opening will
occur December 10.
R. L. A.

!I
rY
r
1
f=

2.C1-THEATR E--2d
Today Only-
MARGUERITE DE LA MOTTE .
in
"BROADWAY MADNESS"
A tale of jazz-mad daughters
and countrybumpkins.
Added
Comedy News
TONIGHT IS
PRESENTATION NIGHT
PRIZES PRIZES
Get your Tickets free daily
with each adult admission
ticket for the Arcade scholar-
,ship.En
=Matinees Evenings .
10c, 20c 10c, 20c, 30c

Good News
Regular Dinner 35c
Regular Supper 30c
Lenas Diner
210 S. 5th Ave. Home Cooking

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WE CLOSE NOV. 1, 1928
on the Huron River at Foot of Cedar St.
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sDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1928
ght Editor-PIERCE ROSENBERG

f
.

"FIGHTING WOLVERINES"
In a university communitI as
aid and conservative as Ann Ar-
or, any attempt to interest a
udent body ,in pep meetings, or
ny suggestion that vocal support
f an athletic team is desirable, is
pt to be looked upon by the unin-
rested as moronic and totally un-
orthy of grown men and women.I
That this .attitude of criticism
nd opposition does exist it must
e admitted and regretted. It is
course simply a branch growth
that cynicism so often found
nong members of the so-called
telligensia. Its believers, at best,
e but few in number. Their in-
uence nevertheless, is demoralz-
.g.
Friday night, Michigan studentsI
e to be given their first oppor-
nity of the year to demonstrate
. tangible and definite form their
illingness to support a Michigan
am, in victory or in defeat. To
lose who have never attended a
p meeting in Hill auditorium, it
sufficient to say that the event
a spectacle in itself well worth

FOR.
YOUR
MORNING BREAKFAST
YOUR
NOON LUNCHEON
YOUR
EVENING DINNER

U
W
I
L
L
F
I
N
D

OR- PIPE
cc'D
3D)g W
IO0 1

~IIJFEE

OR

AFTER THE SHOW AT
NIGHTS

THE BEST PLACE ON
THE CAMPUS

Operated By CRIPPEN DRUG STORES
723 North University Ave.
Just Below Our Campus Drug Store

to

'tf;~
it4., JW EL EL~J ~ ~JELI ~JiJ 'J ~JJELJ ~J~J LIW LI JEL ELIELIELI E~lELI U E E~ ELIE~iJE~lEU JEI U Ei E ELIJEL E~iELIELI LI LI LI EIIE:11111M.,I LI C,

It has, moreover, a very definite
ace in college life, being a tradi-
n almost as old as intercollegiate
mpetition and one as deserving
perpetuation. In a year in
hich Michigan is unfortunate
lough to have a loosing football
am, the desireability of a firm
id loyal student support is the
ore to be emphasized; and there
no place where it can be of more
lue than at student pep meet-
gs.
There has been a tendancy at
ichigan within recent years to
crease the number of pep meet-
gs. Now, it seems, the time has
me when the Varsity is deserving
real sendoffs before every game.
a result officers of the Student
umil have indicated that addi-
nal pep assemblies may be,
fnned for all of the remaining;
mes this year if student interest
indicated by the attendance in;
[1 auditorium Friday night shows,

But to return to the religious is-
sue, we would like to print in The
F e ll o w s h i p Forum, Governor
Smith's creed as an American,
Catholic, published in the Atlantic
Monthly of last April, from which
we quote:
"I recognize no power in the in-
stitutions of my church to inter-
fere with the operations of the
Constitution of the United States
or the enforcement of the law of
the land.
"I believe is absolute separation
of church and state, and in the
strict enforcement of the provisions
of the constitution that Congress
shall make no law respecting an
establishment of religion or pro-i

The last NEW YORKER tells of
a new game that is being played in
that city. It has to do with cig-
arette lighters and betting gentle-
men.
A man recently paused in a
prominent place in that city
to light his cigarette, and had
just started to thumb his light-
er when a stranger stopped
him. The smoker looked up
inquiringly, and was greeted
with "Do you want to bet five
dollars that your -lighter won't
light the first time?"
The smoker was a good sport, so
he accepted the bet, thumbed his
lighter which broke into flame, and
lighted the tobacco. The stranger
handed over five dollars without
comment. The winner was curious
however, and quizzed the loser as
to the reason for the strange bet.
The stranger replied that he
and others made from $50 to
$75 each day betting with other
men who were willing to stake
five or ten dollars r'on their be-
lief that their lighters would
light the first time. Such is
the latest way to make money,

Dalies Frantz, brilliant young
pianist, and holder of a Julliard
foundation scholarship for students
of unusual ability, is to give a con-
cert composed of Johannes Brahms
compositions this evening which
should attract those fond of good
music.
It will be remembered by those
who have attended convocations
during the past year that Mr.
Frantz has assisted at them with
marked success. He is a musician
of unusual promise who has been
in Ann Arbor for the past three
years for the purposes of special
study under Guy Maier. His repu-
tation is not merely local however,
for he has already toured the ma-
jor cities of this country, and was
heard in concert last summer in
Munich, Vienna, and other Europ-
ean cities.
Mr. Frantz's concert this evening
is notable in that its composes an
artistic and representative group
from the masterpieces of Brahms.
The "Sonata in F Minor" composed
of "Allegro Maestoso; Andante Ex-

GRANGER'S

- -mmmm

DANCING TONIGHT

Eight to Ten

The popularity of Granger s is due to the
most pleasing environment for dancing in
combination with ,the snappy music of
Buddy Golden and his Eleven Wolverines.
This is the opinion of thousands of students
who dance at Granger's.

k

Dancing Every
FRIDAY

WEDNESDAY

SATURDAY

Eight to Ten Nine to One Nine to Two

elve

1 ,1

11

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