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October 23, 1928 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-23

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'3, 1928'

'TH E MICHIGAN

DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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UNIVERSITY 0O
PLAY LOC-| A L
Stopher Gives Women
Plans To Assist At
Throughout The
PLAN SATURDAY
University golfers ha
lege of meeting the
women's golf team in
the Barton Hills cour
morning. Before the ga
versity team was coach
Stopher, a professional
is going to help the w
time to time during th
girls who played on th
Katherine McMurray,
Kyer, Geraldine Wilkin
Mary Whitker, '31. The
team was composed of
Cissell, Mrs. Elsie An
Mrs. Norris.
The golf manager f
arrange for Saturday m
naments to be played
the weather permits ou
petition.
This afternoon Mr
Hanley of Detroit will
University course toi
golf class, team,sand sq
training.
MICHIGAN W
INTRODUCES
FOREIGN W R
Through her translat
eign books, Edna Wor
wood, '91, claims the dt
having introduced mor
eign writers than anyo
ican. Mrs. Underwood:
modern languages ands
language. At present s
ing Arabic. . Mrs. Und
cently said, "One shou
mind as an acrobat trea
that is, continual prac
periods of 'let-down'."
In her triology of no
"The New World Tri
books included are: "T
Maker," "The Penitent,
Passion Flower," all of
ture the crumbling of
civilization of the pas
coming of a new Era. I
wood intends to go back
period to 'her flrstkihci
which was the short st
may recall her bookf
Women" which enjoye
of popularity in Engla
as in this country. Mrs.'
has just recently retur
Sicily, and will include
new books' "Adventuresi
lights of Chopin," whi
she will improvise wh:
brated musician plays.
Mrs. Underwood is resid
York City, N. Y.

[ ( 5 MUSIC IS BALANCE IN CHILD'S LIFE
I L I\R AND IS ESSENTIAL, SAYS GALLI-CURCI
O E Nhear music at least once a week I was ten or eleven years old that!
no matter whether they lose a few I really began to enjoy my piano.
hours of sleep or not," said Ma- But it was my experience in that
Instruction; dame Amelita Galli-Curci, who line enabled me to train my voice
Intervals sang last night in Hill auditorium. for opera in the three years after
Year "Their souls must be healthy as I graduated from the Conservatory
well as their bodies," she continu- and during which I gave piano les-
led, "and music is absolutely neces- sons. I started teaching when I
TAMES sary. It is not a luxury." was sixteen, you know."
Balance is the most essential If a child shows any inclination
d the privi- thing in the world, is Madame for any kind of instrument, then
Ann Arbor Galli-Curci's belief, and for that give him lessons on that. If he
a match at reason, children should begin to doesn't, start him out on some-
se Saturday take lessons on some musical in- thing. Take him to concerts and
me the Uni- strument even at as early an age operas, to art museums. Let him
ed by Mr. as four years. "Start them out with become accustomed to things ofl
player who fifteen minutes of practice a day beauty and through the children,
women from ,and gradually increase it to half the nation will become more and
e year. The an hour, an hour, two, three, which more artistic, continued the opera
e team were is what anyone taking their music star. a
'31, Jean seriously would have to spend. America is a music country and
son, '30, and Maybe they won't like it but a lit- her audiences appreciative. "I do
e Ann Arbor tle discipline is good for them. Life enjoy singing in Ann Arbor," she
f M4 H. is made up of discipline-and years said. "The audiences here are so
drew, and after they will be able to appreci- buoyant, so inspiriting, so youthful.
ate it. I feel that they are responding to
s trying to "I started studying piano when everything and the acoustics of the'
orning tour- I was five," Madame Galli-Curci auditorium are very good. In fact,
as long as added, "and I hated it. Hated it America has many halls with good
t-door com- from the bottom of my heart-sit- acoustics--Minneapolis in particu-
ting down every day to a half hour lar."

HO[)|TAL [)| GRO[)0 ENGLISH GOLFERS PLAY DIFFERENT
II OSPITAL PLAYVNEN GAME DUE TO WEATHER CONDITIONS
IS LOCATED ON R9"The hardest feature that Ameri- wheryo e the wind is' the strongest,
can golfers have to contend with and everybody rather sneers at the
in England is the weather," was inland courses as being tame and
The roof of the University hos- Ithe statement of Miss Madge Mil- unworthy of a good golfer.
pit. is "hlf- to Hventyho~ ler, experienced golfer, who played "English players have to adapt
pital is 'half-way to Heaven to in the Women's National English their game to their weather condi-
the sick little tots confined within tournament, last spring. Miss Mil- tions," Miss Miller continued, "and
the hospital walls. For on the roof ler was in Ann- Arbor at the Wom-
there is everything that a child's yc a nAnAbra h on in consequence they haven't near- 1
en's Field house where she assisted ly the perfection, of swing that the
heart could desire. Mrs. Stuart Hanley in coaching American womon golfer has., They
This is the playground of the women in university golf courses. have to use a shorter swing so the
institution, the best part of being "We .simply cannot understand wind won't shake the club at the
sick. A large portion of the roof is anyone playing golf in the midst top of the swing. You can always
closed in with a high wall and part of one of the most terrific wind- tell an English player by the short
of this space is covered over, for storms imaginable," continued Miss back swing and low follow through
use when the sun is too hot or on Miller, "but most of the tourna- she uses in contrast to the Ameri-
rainy days. A Michigan graduate ment last spring was played off can's full swing that causes a high
has decorated the walls with large during the most terrible gales I ball. If an English player used a
paintings from stories familiar to have ever experienced. We'd call full swing, the wind would carry
every child. Within the enclosure them hurricanes over here. the ball so far she'd never find it."
are kiddie kars, swings, a sandpile, "Why, Mrs. Hanley and I each There are two advantages that
wagons, every kind of toy. There wore two heavy sweaters, a leather English players have over us," went
are even sleds for winter sports. jacket, and a long coat all during on Miss Miller. "First, they can
Dolls of every description have the tournament and then we near- play all the year round, and there-
been sent by women's clubs. ly froze. We.wore Angora mittens fore never get out of practice as
The work-shop, maintained by' on our hands, and even then they we do in our winter season, and
Gaelens, honorary medical frater- got so cold and blue, we could hard- second, that most of them have
nity, is, of course, more important ly hold our clubs. I saw one con- been playing the game since they
to the boys than to the girls. They testant from Wales step off the were youngsters. However, they
make everything fron toys to fur- first tee with her hands in a muff, rarely have had any instruction,
niture. Men patients are also at- and it didn't look ridiculous, either. and usually have just picked up a
tracted to the work-shop, and it is "The funny thing about it is that swing of their own, which of course
not unusual to see them there this weather doesn't seem to both- results in a great variety of form.
vying in skill with the children. I er the Englishman at al, but then," "In spite of the weather and the
Kiddies too sick to get up are Miss Miller laughed here, "he really added disadvantage of having to
carried to the roof on their beds. couldn't wait for good weather, if discard our steel shaft clubs and
Out of the 185 child patients, ani he ever wanted a chance to play. become accustomed to the older
average of 60 make use of the re- He'd probably refer to one of these wooden ones Mrs. Hanley made a
creational facilities every day. stiff winds I've been speaking of fine showing in the tournament,"
There is also an indoor play-room. as a mild 'sea-breeze,' and then said Miss Miller, in conclusion.
It is not all play and no work, trot out for his daily thirty-six "She went to the fourth round, and
however, for there is a school in holes. was finally put out with Glenna
the hospital, too, with a staff of "You know, I can't help but ad- Collett; our American champion,
nine teachers in order to keep the mire the way the English do ev- during one of the coldest and bit-
little patients up with their classes. erything in such a sporting man-
Girls and boys are taught sepa- ner," she went on enthusiastically.,.111111 I1llllillilllll1lllilll1111t11111
rately. "They've taken these raging winds,

rs. Stewart
I be at the
nstruct the
[uad in their
VOMAN
MANY
ITERS
ions of for-
thly Under-
stinction of
e new for-
ether Amer-
reads eleven
one ancient
he is study-
derwood re-
Id treat the
its the body,
tice and no
ovels, called,
ology," thej
'he Pageant
" and "The
which pic-
the great
st and the
Mrs. Under-
for a brief
f of writing
ory. Many
'Dear, Dear
d a period
nd as well
Underwood
rned from
among her
in the Twi-
ch stories
ile a cele-
At present
ing in Newi

DELTA OMICRONS
SCHEDULE DANCE
Having interspersed the last few
weeks since the opening of the
School of Music with rushing par-
ties of all descriptions, Delta Omi-1
cron is now preparing for theirI
culminating formal dinner dance
which is to be given next week.
The first party was a patroness
tea given on September 28 which
was a reunion of the patronesses
and the sorority members. Within
a week, October 3, a tea dance was
held for all the new women at the
School of Music and the afternoon
was enlivened by several vocal
solos and piano renditions.
A Bohemian party given October
19 varied the usual run of teas and
dinners. The sorority members
dressed the part in original cos-
tumes and the house was decorat-
ed to give proper atmosphere. The
guests did not wear special cloth-
ing but everyone danced and ate.
Mrs. W. H. Butler offered her
home at 1010 Monroe for a bridge
party which was given October 17.
Seven tables including the -guests
were formed and after an after-
noon of bridge, lunch was served.
Mrs. A. F. Van Sickle has invited
the sorority and their rushees to
a formal musical at her home, 10
Geddes Heights, this evening. Lu-
cite Graham, Mabel Herrick and
Janet Starling will play the piano;
Faye Johnson is to perform on the
flute, and Orma Weber will sing.
The last rushing party will be
next week after which the sorority
will announce its new pledges.

DOCTOR STRESSES'
NEED OF EXERCISE
"We must exercise not only for
the immediate effect on the body,,
but to increase our organic re-
serve," said Dr. Edith F. Sapping-
ton at the health lecture for up-
perclass women Tuesday afternoon
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. "It
is necessary," she continued, "to
increase the power of our lungs
particularly so that we have re-
serve strength if we become ill."I
Dr. Sappington pointed out that'
the University afforded some kind
of exercise for every type of stu-
dent.
"Just as important as exercise,
however, is rest," she added, and{
proceeded to discuss the two types
of rest-sleep and relaxation. Em-
phasis was laid upon the necessity
of regularity in sleep. Average
adults need a minimum of eight1
hours, she said.
W. A. A. BOARD MEETS
The executive board of the W.
A. A. will meet Wednesday at 4:00
in the field house.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$4.00 per year. It's worth it!
TELLING
TOUCHES

U -
NOTICES

O
E

0- - - - -o
The house committee of the
Woman's League will meet with
Mrs. Henderson at the Ingalls St.
entrance of the new League build-
ing on Tuesday at 3:45.
The second regular meeting of
the University Girls' Glee club will
be held at 4:30 today in the School
of Music. The regular time that;
has been set for all meetings is
Tuesday at 4:30.
Orchesis will meet at 7:15 tomor-

which really are a tremendous han-
dicap, and converted them into the
biggest hazard of their game. Real-
ly, the only legitimate courses in
England are the sea-side courses
'~Le Worth Beauty Shoppe _
300 S. State St. -
(Cor.#Liberty and State)
PERMANENT WAVING,
MARCELLING, FACIALS,
MANICURING,
SHAMPOOING
FINGER WAVING
Mrs. N. M. Hitchcock, Mgr.
Open Evenings Dial 2-141
: 'lil IliitIlli lfEil1i1l itill li[Ilh'111

row evening, Oct. 24, in
en's Athletic building.

the Wom-I

THE QUALITY
HEMSTITCHING SHOP
Alterations and Dressmaking
We take your orders for Hand-
Embroidered Handkerchiefs
Choose your Costume Jewelry
from our stock
KLENZONA CLEANS CLOTHES
OVER CRIPPEN'S DRUG STORE

HOCKEY PRACTICE TODAY
Women who have missed inter-
class hockey practices may still
make the second team by reporting1
at the remaining practices at Palm-
er Field at 4 o'clock every Tuesday
afternoon. The hockey games will
begin on Nov. 1. This opportunity
for practice offers all women an
excellent chance to earn from 50
to 75 W. A. A. points.
In case of rain this afternoon,
all women out for hockey must re-
port' at the field house at the reg,.
ular time anyway.
FELT HATS ,
Tuesday & Wednesday $3
McKinsey
Hat Shop
227 So. State
111111111111111 iini lI inInIn1IIU
E OPTICAL
DEPARTMENT
Lenses and Frames made 2
To Order=E
Optical Prescriptions
Filled
HALLERS E
State St. Jewelers

,i

sf

I

3011/2 South- State Street
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Enjoy yourself having
Luncheon or Tea at
the quaint Tea Room,
ivhere the Tea pours
from 12 noon until 12
night.
A Teaologist Will Read
the Leaves

i

I

i

e
... ..

_. _ _ . y r y _._ ..._.. . . . a i _ i..i .v r._ r..r... a... .. . .._r.

Gloves

School,

Street and Sportswear

that harmonize with your new
fall costumes are made of gen-
uine African Cape Skin.
$3.95

require these durabi"

OXJFORDS

Margart'
(Ii rrn i9ยง4v

,,,, t
y A
1 J~/Jt
r

$485

f ..
), l1 Yf:., :i
i>
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r s::
" "Yr :: ; ...
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r
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7 t:: f ,, f r -
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r OQ'Np .: . r',..r'..
s{ i%'
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Fashioned in-
BROWN, TAN,
VELVET CALF

4

or BLACK
SKIN

;,: . '
M
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Hose

--silk
in all

chiffon from top to toe
the new fall shades.

I

PERMANENT
WAVES
of Distinction

Atmosphere. adds so much to
a meal. You will always enjoy
eating in our new shop.

2. Ues~sediolvbi4it Sen
we/a choiy clays

$1.95

Special attention given
Private Parties

to

ii II A I

III

,A T -- - I -' - 1'

fll I I

I

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