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October 20, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, 0

HOOER MAJORITY
S SOUTHERN STATES
ALABAMA, ARKANSAS LISTED
AS DOUBTFUL IN DIGEST
NATION-WIDE VOTE
RETURNS SET NEW RECORD
Democrat Carries Lead In Georgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, And
South Carolina
NEW YORK, Oct. 19-Hoover is
leading in six of the ten states in
the "Solid South" as more than
2,500,000 returns from all of the
forty-eight states are reported in
the Literary Digest's huge national
presidential poll which was pub-
lished yesterday.
With the vote announced as not
yet completed, Smith is carrying
only Georgia, Louisiana, Missis-
sippi and South Carolina, while
Hoover has substantial margins
over 'his rival in the Democratic
strongholds of Florida, North Caro-
line, Texas and Virginia and spar-
ing leads in Alabama and Arkan-
sas, which leads the Literary Di-.
gest classes as doubtful.
Border States Concur
The border states of Kentucky,
Maryland, Oklahoma and Tenes-
° qe give the Republican candidate
a comfortable plurality.
Of the total of 2,529,997 votes re-
turned in this fifth week's tabula-
tion, Hoover has 1,593,436, while
Smith has 920,234. This gives a
percentage of 63 for Hoover to 36
forSmith, which is almost the pre-
cise ratio of last week's returns.
Hoover at present shows a lead
in this "straw poll" in several of
the states that are generally .con-
sidered doubtful, as in Wisconsin,
where he is ahead by 31,351 to 21,--
847; in North Dakota, where he
leads by 5.408 to 2,803; in Min-ne-
sota, where his ratio is 52,882 to
23;021; and in Montana, where he
is polling 6.750 to Smith's 3,152.
Majority Is Large
The Republican candidate is
leading in returns from all the east
ern states from Maine to Delaware
by ratios of 2 to 1 and 3 to 1 ex-
cept in New York, where though he
has a substantial ead in the .state
as ,a whole, the New York City vote
is strongly favorable to the Demo-~
cratic side, showing Smith with
130,822 to Hoover's 93,974.
An .analysis of "how the same
voters voted in 1924" offers the
significant shift that for the first
time since this "postcard election"
was started Smith :is polling more
of. his strength from voters who
state that they voted Democratic
in the last presidential election
than those who have changed from
Republican ranks, although the
difference is rather slight. Pre-.
viously he has had in his column
more 1924 Republicans than 1924
Democrats.
Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
Prices:-Nights $1 to $3.85; Wed.
Mat. $1 to $; Sat. Mat. $I-$2.50
Philip Goodman Presents
ETON & SHAW
WHE 5 O'CLOCK GLRL
SHU.BERT

LAFAYETTE
Beginning Sunday, October 14
LEW CANTOR Offers
The Skull
Eves. 50c to $2.50-Thurs. Mat.
5Oc to $1-Sun. Mat. 50c to $1.50

KARTZKE TALKS
ON NEW GERMAN
SCHOOL TRENDS
"German education is tending to
escape from extreme individualism
to social responsibility and collectiv-
ism; the shadow of the military,
system, which cast its gloom over
most of our social institutions, has
passed away," declared Prof. Georg
Kartzke, assistant director of theE
Institute for Foreigners at the Uni-!
versity of Berlin in his illustrated
lecture yesterday afternoon in the,
auditorium of the University high
school.
"The basis of present-day educa-
tion in Germany," he continued, "is
the grundschule, or common school,
which provides the first four years
of elementary training, and to
which all students, regardless of
rank, must first go. Above thisl
level the schools are of many ,dif-
ferent types, but usually about nine
years of study follow graduation
from the common school. All thei
varied types of higher schools are
united by an emphasis on German '
history and culture. The cardinal
principle of modern educational
theory, in Germany-}even more than
in the United States, is instruction
through activity, through integrat-
ed observational work based on the
pupil's environment. Home work
is strictly avoided. Self-govern-
ment is stressed, and a few outsidej
activities are being introduced."
Co-education is the exception
rather than the rule in Germany,
although girls are given the same
opportunities as boys, he said.
"According to the Constitution,"
he declared, "history must be taught
in German schools from the stand-
point of international reconciliation,
and the League of Nations is a re-
quired course."
With the increased freedom in
educational theory has come a I
healthy tendency of experiment.
In some schools the principal is
elected by his colleagues for a two-
year term. Another experiment is
the parents' councils, elected every
two years in some schools to act in
an advisory capacity.

SURVEY SITE OF TYEWRING
TEPEWRITER
NEW DORMITORYA makes of ma-
chines. Our equip-
mnent and person-
Surveyors employed by the-Build- nel are considered
ings and Grounds department are among the best in the State. The
now making topographical maps of result of twe~inty years' carefujl
the site of the proposed new wom- building.
en's dormitory, it was announced O.D MORRILL
yesterday by Irving W. Truettner, 17 Ni.kes Arcade Phone 615
department maintenance inspector.

The Art of the Films

appears only on our programs and in jistifica-
tion of this unequaled ar we modesly boast
entertailiment second to nonc. Our announce-
ments axe looked forward to with p1eaSing
anticipation.

I.-

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IT WILL MAKE YOU "DIZZY
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Wed.. Nov. 14
The Doctor's Dilemma
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Mon., No.1.9
The Second Man
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Ned McCobb's Daughter
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John Ferguson
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POLLOCK
FRENCH

HOST TO
VISITORS

M. Henri de Kerillis and M. Paul
Reynaud, two noted figures in
French politics, visited the univer-
sity yesterday as the guests of Prof.
James K. Pollock of the Political
Science department.
M. de Kerillis is political editor
of L'Echo de Paris, the leading con-
servative _Parisian :newspaper. M.
Reynaud, an attorney, Is a member
of the chamber of deputies and of
the committee on finance of that
body. Both are touring the'. United
States to study the current presi-
dential campaign and have travell-
ed extensively with.both candidates.
The Frenchmen were deeply im-
pressed by the broad scope and the
many facilities of popular educa-
tion evinced here. M. de Kerillis
spoke at the :luncheon yesterday.

"OUR DANCING
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