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October 18, 1928 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TH E -MIC H IGA N

DAIL Y

THURSDAY, OC

)BER

------------

SITY

TEAM

SCRIMMAGES

DESPITE

WEA THE

f
s s

EN GAIN EXPERIHNCE
N SLIPPERY GRIDIRON
am Has Difficulty Breaking Up'
Buckeye Passing Attack As..A
Reproduced By Freshmen
ACKFIELD IS UNCERTAIN
Rain failed to dampen the spirits
the Varsity gridmen yesterday
ernoon, and the Wolverines
nt through one of the longest
immages of the year against two
ked teams from the freshman
uad that had been schooled in
e use of the attack used by the
rmidable Buckeye eleven in the
itenberg and Northwestern tilts.
Equipped with mud cleats and
rking in two complete teams, the
rsity squad received a wealth of
perience in handling the slippery
all as well as in keeping their
ting on a sodden field, for South
rry field was anything but firm
er the showers which had fallen
ermittently throughout the day.
Line' Holds Well,
Shortly after 4 o'clock Coach
d Wieman led his charges out of
e field house where the prelim-
,ry limbering-up drills had been
Ld, and the Varsity lined up
ainst a husky bunch of red-clad
arlings. The latter received
aveling's kickoff but had little
acess in gaining consistently
ainst the regulars.
The forward wall showed to ad-
atage in stopping the Buckeye
ys, the men frequently breaking
:ough to stop the freshman backs
fore they reached the line of
immage. But the backs experi-
ced considerable difficulty in
eaking up the replica of Ohio
ate's short passing attack. Al-
ough the receiver was soon cut
wr after making a catch, the
et Buckeye backs are apt to
wve very dangerous unless a de-
ridable defense against this mode
attack is perfected.
May Bench Gembis
.t is still more or less of a mys-
'y as to whom Coach Wieman will;
e in the starting backfield Satur-.
y. Yesterday's workout shed lit-
light upon the matter, as fre-
ent substitutions were made in
e effort to uncover a smooth I
nctioning combination.
f the field is heavy, it will not
surprising to see both Captain
ch and big Joe Gembis in the
ckfield to sustain a line-plung-
attack, otherwise it seems not
all improbable that the latter
l be benched temporarily in fav-
of a lighter and faster back.
(Continued on Page 7)

CONTEST OF WILDCATS .
WILL BRING TOGETHER .
PURPLE AND KENTUCKY1
(Special To The Daily)
EVANSTON, Oct. 17-It will be
wildcats against wildcats when
Northwestern and Kentucky meet
in Dyche stadium here Saturday.
Both teams are nicknamed the
"Wildcats" and if their names mean
anything, the coming contest1
should see some ferocious fighting.
Two players on the Kentucky
eleven are brothers of famous grid
stars. Ed Covington, shifty half-
back, is a brother of Herb Coving-
ton, all-American quarterback at
Centre college several years ago
when that institution was turning
out its great elevens, and Sandy
Nowack, regular end on the Ken-
tucky team, is a brother of "Butch"
Nowack, captain of the University
of Illinois eleven this year.
Dixie Line Is Heavy
The Dixie team has one of the
heaviest elevens in the South and
judging from its victory over Wash-!
ington and Lee last -Saturday is in'
line for high honors among the
southern teams this year. The Ken-
tucky line averages 192 pounds.
Besides meeting the Kentucky
Wildcats, Northwestern will also
tackle the Notre Dame second team
in a game which will open the af-
ternoon's activities.
Several members of the Purple
squad who faced Ohio last Satur-
day will be unable to participate in
the Kentucky game because of in-
juries. Harry Kent, tackle, receiv-
ed a serious leg injury which willl
keep him on the sidelines for sev-
eral weeks. Others who were dis-
abled but may be able to get in
shape by Saturday are Leo Hanley,
quarterback, and Larry Oliphant,
end.

ARMY, HARVARD RENEW RIVALRY
- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - -

4;TI~flNi RA nri[P 2TF AM

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"a1"'""J "l'"Jl4i I L* i
TO PLAY BOILERMAKERS
IN HOMECOMING GAME
(Special To The -Daily)
MADISON, Wis., Oct. 17-Neither
Glenn Thistlethwaite nor Jimmiea
Phelan are superstitious, and con-
sequently both will be saved much
worry this week, !for Saturday'.
game between Wisconsin and Pur-
due will be the thirteenth meeting I
of the two teams during their foot-
ball relationship.
The Badgers, hopeful and anxi-I
ous to open their Conference slate
with a victory, will journey to Laf-
ayette on the week-end to face a,
Purdue eleven, set to atone for its
loss to Minnesota last week. The
Boilermakers have selected their
annual Homecoming game for this
purpose, and the Wisconsin coaches
are now busily engaged in keying
their boys for' this important clash.
If tradition plays any part in a
football game these days, Phelanj
will have a sound argument upon
which to base his 'fight talk' prior
to this coming contest with tale
Cardinals. Purdue has not succeed-
ed in downing the Badgers since.
the first time these two schools
met on the gridiron. Twice the
Boilermakers have come very close,
but in the 12 played their victories
total one.
Cardinals Have Edge
Wisconsin went down to defeat
in 1892, when one of the early Bad-
ger teams fell by the score of 32
to 4. Twice since then the Boiler-
makers have earned a tie verdict,
but the other nine games have
been taken by Wisconsin. In 1913
a 7 to 7 score thwarted the Purdue
boys in their effort to shake the
jinx, while two years ago at Ross-
Ade stadium, the Badgers and the
Phelanites battled to a scoreless
' tie.
Last fall at Camp Randall, 'Pest'
Welch and his mates were defeat-
ed by the margin of one touchdown
not long after they had soundly
thrashed Harvard to the satisfac-
tion of the Middle West and thou-
sands of other football f a n s
throughout the country. From
1916 until 1925 Purdue and Wiscon-
sin played no football games. The
relationship was renewed when
George Little came to take over
the Cardinal athletic generalship.
Under Phelan, Purdue has be-
come a real factor in Big Ten foot-
ball. His loss to the strong Gopher
machine, heavy favorites for the
title, was in no manner an indica-
tion of weakness. The Boilermak-
ers' backfield is known to be as
versatile and clever as any in the
Conference, and Welch's punting is
exceptional.

TASK OF STOP INGHSTLING HOOSIERS
AnhurnrbIITn -iiinniiro n I IkIflO rl

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I

LONIIUN IJ~ LVrVR[ ,ILINI I tYIRf

ndiana
In

Team May Prove
Path Of Illini To
Ten Grid Honors

Obstacle rated one of the best guards in the
Conference, played only a few min-
ig utes of the game. One thing is
certain-the highly touted Illinois
bone-crushing attack is going to

STRONG LINES TO MEET find plentyo01
through a Hoosier line that includes
Pat Page and his Indiana eleven Randolph, giant center; Unger,
don't seem satisfied with handing tackle; Catterton, end, and Mat-
the Wolverines the first defeat thews at one of the guard posi-
they've ever received at the hands tions.
of a Hoosier team, and therein lies Page Has Reserves
the source of the nightmares which And one of the best features of
have been so troublesome to Coach the Hoosier machine is the plenti-
Bob Zuppke of Illinois lately. ful quantity of reserve material
Instead of the clarion call, "Stagg available a r o u n d Bloomington.
Coach Page has capable under-
Fears Purdue," which yearly issues studies for the above four players,
from the Midway to drown out all while there are three or four veter-
the noise of Chicago shootings, this ans contesting for each of the
season has seen the birth of a new other positions.
blues song, "Zuppke's Scared Of The Indiana backfield contains
Indiana." Whether Coach Bob's several stars, noteworthy among
fears will be realized or not, the them Chuck Bennett, offensive cap-
Indian mentor has certainly reason tain, who tore off the Michigan
to, worry--the Illini are faced with tackles for several good gains, and
the unpalatable task of meeting a Faunce and Rheinhardt, two fast
determined, tried and proven Indi- and tricky open field runners who
ana eleven in the "first real test are contesting for the other half-
of the season."back post. Brubaker, a flashy
Indians Have Veterans . sophomore, Hughes, Moss, and Har-
Of course we'll admit that the rell are fighting for the other back-
Indians have 13 veterans back from field positions, with the possibility
their last year's championship that one of them may take the left
team. That ought to help some, halfback berth instead- of Faunce
but Pat Page has a mere total of or Rheinhardt, while one of the
nineteen lettermen on his present many Hoosier reserves may earn a
Hoosier squad, besides several soph- regular position before the Illini
omores who have already ousted game.
some of the veterans from their Few Reserves Available
positions. Of the Illini little is known-the'
The Indiana line isn't very heavy, 13 veterans from the. strongest
but its good, as Michigan 'will at- team in last year's Conference are
test. Outweighed considerably, the back, but outside of them Zuppke

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,
-

Renewing football relations with}
Harvard for the first time in 18
years, the Army is entering the
Crimson-Cadet clash this year a
slight favorite. In the 13 games
played between these schools, be-
ginning in 1895 and ending in 1910,1

the Army has never been victori-
ous over Harvard and has been
able to score but one touchdown.
Captain French and Red Murrel,
opposing fullbacks around which
the powerful offense of each is
built, are expected to turn in the
feature performances of the fray.

4'
r

i

ALLEGHENY TEAM'S AERIAL GAME
EXPECTED TO TROUBLE PANTHERS

(Special To The Daily)
PITTSBURGH, Pa., Oct. 17-A
different Alleghefly college grid
team will invade the Pittsburgh
stadium next Saturday to battle a
Panther eleven, which, like all
teams, can be beaten. This was
proved to the satisfaction of West
Virginia last Saturday.
Last year Pitt ran up the largest
score of the season by walloping
the Meadville boys, 52-0. The Alle-
gheny outfit was composed largely
of sophomores, so the same play-
ers, with a lot more football knowl-
edge under their hats, are deter-
mined to wipe out that humiliat-
ing memory.
After holding Dartmouth for
three quarters last Saturday, Alle-
gheny gave way in the final period

to lose a stiff battle, 37 to 12.
Allegheny p a s s e d frequ6ntly,
completing nine out of 19. Both
their scores were the result of an
aerial attack, the first one coming
on a long pass to Hughes, Alle-
gheny end.
Emphatic proof was evinced in
the West Virginia game that Pitt l
is sadly wanting in an aerial de-
fense. Coach Sutherland will drill
his, men in forward pass tactics
throughout this week to combatl
the touted pass attack of the in-'
vaders.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,j
$4.00 per year. It's worth it!

B Team To Play Ohio1
On FerryField Gridl
Ferry field will again be used for
football contests as a result of the
decision to play the Ohio State-
Michigan reserve team's game there
Saturday. The fray is scheduled
to start at 2:30 o'clock in the af-
ternoon.
The Buckeyes will be the first' of
the Conference "B" teams that the
Michigan junior varsity will meet.
This game and the tilt with the
Wisconsin reserves at Madison on
the following= Saturday are the
hardest games on the schedule.
Student coupons will be honored
Saturday. Tickets may be purchas-
ed at game time, the admission
price being one dollar.'

Hoosiers held the Wolverines to a
negligible quantity of ground gain-
ed by plunging, and in the last
quarter literally tore the Michigan
forward wall to shreds. And this
despite the fact that their defen-
sive captain, "Rags" Matthews,

seems to nave ittie to work witn.
The Indians have had little diffi-
culty in winning their first two
games from Bradley and Coe, but
their strength is as yet untried.
And to add to Coach Zuppke's wor-
ries, reserves are scarce.

..
'
F
Y
x

NEW YORK PUCK TEAM BUYS DYE
IN ATTEMPT TO BOLSTER TEAM

(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Oct. 17-New YorkI
Americans of the national profes-
sional hockey league have purchas-
ed Cecil "Babe" Dye from the Chi-
cago Blackhawks for a sum report-
ed to have been in the neighbor-i
hood of $15,000. ;
Dye, a heavy scorer, suffered a
fractured ankle just before the

start of the season last year and
played in only a few games.
Acquisition of the Chicago star
gives the Americans, who finished
in the cellar last season, six new
players. The others are Johnny
Sheppard of Detroit, Connors from
Boston, Punch Broadbent from Ot-
awa, Rabbit McVeigh from Chicago
and Jess Spring from Niagara of
the Canadian league.

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