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May 25, 1929 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-25

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7 . PA-GE O

THE MICHIGAN

DAI LY

SA'T'T'RDA'Y', MAT 25; 1929 '

~ThPAUETWO~ SATTJRDAY, MAY 25, 1929

4

FEATINGINSECTKing George Regains Health At Resort;
Te Leaves For Windsor Castle After Long Stay
IURIOUS TO FOREST
TREES IN LAKES AREW EHEE

PPresent Education
Temed Hazar

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WOOD DESTROYED IN LAST 20
YEARS IS ENOUGH TO
CIRCLE EARTH
SAWFLY IS WORST PEST
Professor Graham'To Leave June 9
To Make Investigation Of
Conditions
Leaf eating insects are more in-
jurious to forest trees in the Lake
states than any other group of in-
sects, Professor S. A. Graham of the
entomology department of the
school of forestry and conservation,
declared yesterday in comenting
upon the work in forest entomology
which will be undertaken this sum-
mer by the Bureau of Entomology
of the United States department of
agriculture, the University of Mich-
igan, University of Minnesota, and
the Minnesota commission of forest
and fire prevention.
Prof. Graham, who recently re-
turned from St. aul where ar-
rangements were completed for this
week, expects to leave June 9 for
Minnesota. The four departments
have been conducting investigations
'of forest pests in the Lake states
for a number of years.
The two most harmful insects,
Prof. Graham said, are the larch
sawfly and the jack pine sawfly,
although the spruce budworm, he
said, has come in for its share of
attention.
Will Solve Problems
"Our efforts are directed toward
the solution of some of the prob-
lems arising as a result of the ac-
tivities of these pests," Prof. Gra-
ham stated. "These insects are en-
emies of forest trees and have al-
ready caused heavy losses." The
larch sawfly, he said, has in the
past 20 years destroyed more than
69 per cent of all the merchantable
tamarck in the Lake states. The
spruce budworm, during the same
period, has destroyed more than
200,000,000 cords of balsam fir in
the same area, in New England, and
in eastern Caanda. "The wood thus
destroyed would be sufficient to
supply our paper mills with raw
material for halfa century," Prof.
Graham remarked. ,If cut and
stacked in a pile four feet wide and
fifty feet high such a volume cf
wo d would be sufficient to encircle
the earth at the equator."
"Results of our studies show that
losses of this sort probably can be
avoided by the application of prop-
er methods. of forest management.
What the best methods are we can-
not say as yet. That is the purpose
of our forest insect investigations.
Progress Is Made
"We have, however, made consid-
erable progress and already have
been able to make some definite
recomendations. We have deter-
mined, for example, that outbreaks
of the spruce budworm originate in
forest areas where balsam fir is
predominant. By favoring the more
valuable spruce and pines the re-
sultant reduction in the abundance
of balsam fir in the forest out-
breaks the spruce budworm will be
practicaly impossible. We have also
determined that certain environ-
mental conditions are favorable
and others unfavorable to the mul-
tiplication of the larch sawfly.
"Thus by studying the insects in
their relation to their environment
we hope to deevlop methods of for-
est management that will make our
forests as 'insect proof' as possible,"
he concluded.
UNIVERSITY OF BOSTON. Forty-
five graduates of Boston are now
serving as presidents of colleges or
universities.

IS UES TOF SCHIOJL
Dean William Russell of Teachers
college, Columbia university, will be
the guest of the faculty and gradu-
ate students of the school of Edu-
cation at a luncheon to be given
this noon at the Michigan Union.
Dean Russell is spending the week-
end in Detroit and will come from
that city to Ann Arbor this morn-
ing.
Before his appointment at Co-
lumbia in 1927 Dean Russell was
dean of the college of education at
the University of Iowa. In recent
years he has been' actively engaged
in studying various phases of inter-
national education and has served
as adviser to several foreign gov-
ernments in aiding them to develop
their educational policies. In 1921-
22 he was member of the China
educational committee; in 1925-27
he was the American delegate to
the world federation of educational'
associations, and during 1925 was
acting director of the Institute ofj
International Education.

Speaking before the American
Association for Adult Education in
its session this week at the Uni-
versity of North Carolina, Dr. Wil-
liam John Cooper, Federal Commis-
sioner of Education, declared that
the present educational level of
American voters presents a hazard
in the social and economical life of
the country.
With an average sixth or seventh.
grade education,!which is the case
of the American voting body, Dr.
Cooper believes that such an. elec-
torate can hardly be expected tol
solve intelligently such problems as
are presented by the complexity of
modern life. He recommended the
further expansion of the adult edu-
cation movement, which provides
for post-school study.
The chief danger, according to
the educational administrator, lies
in the fact that America is now a
creditor nation, and that as such
the old order of isolation is no
longer possible. The new problems
of international tariffs and debts
can not be met with the equipment
of the past

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Last Times Today
WUERTH
You'll be sorry if you miss
one of our sound programs.
You'll be sorry if you don't
come EVERY WEEK.
When your neighbors tell
you about the marvelous en-
joyment you'll wish you had
been here too.
--On This Program -
Miller and Farrell
Song Specialties
Richard Bonelli
"Barber 'of Seville"
SPECIAL MID-NITE SHOW
TONIGHT
11 O'CLOCK
Clara Bow
"Wild Party"
TICKETS ON SALE

Here's the By!

Here's the boy who
did the job of making
a fun-fest of a thrilling,
gipping melodrama!

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King George and Queen Mary of England, snapped close-up, depart-
ing from Bognor, where monarch regained health, for Windsor Castle,
from which he had been absent nearly a year.

Ili

GRAF ZEPPELIN
RETURNS HOME
(By Associated Press>
FRIEDRICHSTAFEN, Germany,!
May 24.-The Graf Zeppelin re-
turned at dawn today to Friedrich
shafen from Cuers, France, where
it made an. emergency landing a
week ago today, after turning back!
near Gilraltar from an attempt to
cross the Atlantic.
Aboard the dirigible when it
landed here were 14 of the 18 pas-
sengers who made the outward
bound trip, and in addition seven
French naval officers, invited as the
special guests of Dr. Hugo Eckener,!
the ship's master, in appreciation
for French aid in landing his ma-
chine in its emergency last week.
A landing crew seized the haw-
sers and brought it to earth at 5:06
a. m. (11:06 p. in., Thursday, Detroit $
time). By 5:30 a. m., the airship
was safely in its hangar, the land-
ing crew following directions given,
them through a megaphone by"
Capt. Von Schiller.
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. Dr.1
Fred Shannon. winner of the Pulit-
zer prize for the best book in the
~field of United States history, has
been secured by the history depart-
ment to teach in summer school.

Exams Are Held Up I
As Professor Fishes
r (By Associated Press)
NEW I t, May 24.-A pro-
fessor at Columbia university ob-
sent-mindedly went fishing Thurs-
day while 100 students awaited an
examination for bachelor degrees.
When Prof. Parker Thomas
Moon failed to appear to give the
assembled students their examina-
tion in "international relations;.
an investigation was started which
located him at his summer home
in Woodmont, Conn. The lure of
fishing haunts had banished fjom
his mind all thought of school.
New Postage Stamp
Will Honor Inventor

tMI -
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DRIVE HOME
And Save Money
Ford Touring $30 Ford Sedan
Dord e Touring 7 Chevrolet Coupe
weTrinChevrolet Coupe
winter top
Buick Touring Buick Sedan
Nash Coupe Jewett Roadster
Buy with confidence free the Graham Paige Deaer.
M MOTOR SALES, Inc.
332 E. Washington Street
Bring this advertisement and get $2.00 credit on your purchase.

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DUWI,
FEDRIC MARCH
JOHN CROMWELL,
JACK AKIE f

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t?'l./d./1.. ./"..I:J". l .I, ". " . rG°/. '~.r .I.l., J.1', .J. . °.! Jtii !". .! e";, llJl i'"l. II

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Thomas Edison will receive trib-
ute on a postage stamp on June
5th, it was learned at the Post;
Office today. It is to commemorate
the fiftieth anniversary of the pro-
duction of the first incandescent
light bulb by Edison. The new
stamp, the two-cent denomination,
will be printed in carmine.
Want Ads Pay
. ,. .r, .rreesrrr.rr r..rrr

The Art of Silent Drama

Cosmopolitan

Opening

Today-Engagement

Limited Through Tuesday Only

11

P gap Lobe ri a ,Land
Where len forget All!

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PACKARD
ANN ABRSO MONDAY, MAY 27
GROUNDS
PIONR ~
GRAND STAND CHRIRS RESERVED
InD GENERAL, ADMISSION TICKETS ON SRLE CIRCUS DRY
At same prices as on show grounds.
Dawson Bros. Drug Store, 106 S. Main St.

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We're
Expecting
tonight

Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
The All-Star Fun Classic
The Royal Family
Nights, $1, $1.50, $2, $2.50 and $3
Wednesday Matinee
Best Seats $2

('ani le dance
(and cani le step?
Is~ he fasit and
.. full typep?
LliA rlcen)-
is lie smart?
. +I131)! Youll spso~).L
fromi the start!!
Int fact, he's die
lw~ds wonider as L D
Alic'auggerrund
byE Rnban

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EarnExtraCredits
During Summer Vacation
The change and recreation so necessary to ev-
ne are here combined wih superior oppor-
tunityi for educational advancement. Boating,
swimming, tennis, concerts, dramatic perform-
ances, inspiring lectures, etc., are all available.
Organized excursions to industrial, financial
and art centers of Chicago. Courses covering
full year's work in General Chemistry. Physi.
hographiy and Geology or Zoology.

series of events
that you'll vote this
picture the scream
of screen enter-
tainment.
)(F-ia 1

You'ii enjoy

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