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May 29, 1929 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-05-29

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Y7R,!SDAY, MAY 16, 1929

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

_ ___
_

I'AW~ E'IVE

h L
FREHMN PAGEANT
AND LANTERN NIGHT
CELEBRATION IS HELD
FESTIVAL OF SPRING IS
PRESENTED BY FIRST
YEAR WOMEN
VARSITY BAND PLAYS
Procession of Women Marks
Passing Of Classes;
"M" Is Formed
After its postponement because
of raid Tuesday, the Lantern Night
ceremo'gnies took place last night
be r al huge crowd of students,
culty nien'ibers, and visitors. In
I sp1) of the unfortunate delays4
p ,an& for the luncheon, the Fresh-
J bPageant, and the procession
Meit bff beautifully, to the entire
5a tlsation and glory of the Senior
ceass, inwhose honor Lantern Night
fs eld.Y
The Varsity band played a group
o ffvorite Michigan songs during
he picnic supper. At promptly 6
o'clock thePageant began. It was
in the natore:of a festival honoring
the Spring, andgave opportunities
for many aesthetic, folk, and Old
English dances. Betty Healy, '32,
chairman of the Pageant, deserves
a great deal of credit for her splen-
did effort in producing such a j
unique spectacle.
*Asthe last feature on the pro
gram, the audience .was treated to
the"pituresquie scene of the Sen-
irs in their caps and gowns, carry-
ing lighted lanterns and followed
by the three lower classes, windingo
over the hills in the traditional7
Lantern Night procession. TheyJ
were led by Marie Hartwig, '29, and
escorted by leaders and aides picked
fropi among the most distinguished
women Ineach 'class.
Lanterns were passed to the jun-
ior, symbolic of their entering
upon the last year of their Univer-
sty careers, , and flower-covered
hEpps were held by the sophomores
for the seniors 'to pass through on
thitr way out .from their Alma
Dater.a
t the end of the march, the b
wo hen formeda large, illuminated n
'M" on the field, and sang several
bfthe old, well-known Michigan o.
song, concluding with the "Yellow
snd Blue"a
LEAGUE POPULAR
WITH HOSTESSES a
r____, H
Luncheon by Mrs. G. L. Walls for i.
7guests was the opening function
of many affairs held In the League
building yesterday. Luncheon was g
seed in the Assembly hall.
Three dinners took place in dif- t
f6rent parts of the building. last 4
riight. The Senior Education class t
held a banquet at 5:30 o'clock in n'
order to enable members of the b
class t attend Lantern Night. One 0
hundred covers were laid. f.
i
Sociology Society
Alpha Kppa Delta, held a ban-
quet at 6:30 o'clock in a private
dining room, at which 35 members
were present. MissGrace .Rich-
ards also entertained a party of
friends at dinner.
Mr.MeMuiray
Waxes Poetic

over Tobacco II

TA
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:s

,sA

tA MAY-DAY DREAM" IS THEME
OF FRESHMAN CLASS PAGEANT
In "A May-Day Dream," the cleaned both the air and ground.1
women of the Freshman class last For the second time in Pageant his-
night danced their way to the mnd tory the Freshman student nurses
nttook part in the Pageant, and enterI
of their Freshman year, as the as the villagers. Their fresh green
traditional Lantern Night ccremo- and red and, white costumes were
hies marked the passing of classes. entirely of their own planning
Peopling the dreams of the Boy and and making. Milkmaids with real
Girl, about whom the Pageant pails, shepherds and shepherdesses
centered, were all sorts of im- with crooks, Morris dancers, and
aginative folk, from brown and peasant country dancers followed
green wood creatures, to the milk- in succession, as the childrens
maidshand Morris dancers of old dream unfolded.
English fame. Glee Club Are Minstrels
The children were led to a won- Strolling minstrels, garbed in
derful play spot by the Butterflies, brilliant orange, and brown, made
and followed by Balloon dancers up of the members of the Freshman
who gave them a balloon to play Girls' Glee Club sang as they came
with. After being entertained by upon the field. As the Highlanders!
the wood creatures who followed ; followed, the entire cast grouped
the children fell asleep, and the about the Maypole, following the
stage was set for their dreams. English custom, and as they dis-
Nurses Take Part appeared into the wood, the chil-
Ragged, patched chimney sweeps dren awakened and wandered away,
set to work with their brooms and still in the wonder of their dreams.

i_ _. ......®, ,.. , .®. .. ....e.

Tickets For Dances Sold at Main
Desk on First Foor of
League Building
CAFETERIA WILL OPERATE
Dancing in the League ballroom
to Bud Golden's orchestra as pre-
sented by Bob Carson is now an es-
tablished feature of the week end's
activities.
Couples who dance at the League
this Friday and Saturday will ob-
serve a great change in both the
appearance and atmosphere of the
ball room. During the week the
League has completed several new
arrangements which have affected
a decided difference.
The floor will be improved this
week with the use of a different
preparation from that which has
been used heretofore. Control of
the lights by a reostat will create
an entirely new atmosphere, and
the addition of a platform for the
orchestra will remove past diffi-
culties of hearing the music and
watching the entertaining stunts
of the orchestra.
During the intermission food
will be served in the cafeteria on
the first floor just below the ball-
room. Couples are requested not to
go above the second floor during

DR. BELL, MISS HAL
AT HIGH SCH
"As women we should find out
where our aptitudes lie, and not try
to copy men," said Dr. Margaret
Bell in her talk before the delegates
of the High School Girls' Sports
Conference at a luncheon yesterday
noon in the field house. "I agree
with President Little that men andl
women are different-they have!
different aptitudes and different l
rhythms."
Dr. Bell stated that while the
delegates to the Conference were
leaders, chosen for their scholar-
ship .and extra-curricular activities,
she did not advocate college as the
ultimate goal for all of them, be-
cause other things are better for
some people. The fact that these
girls have ability for leadership,I
however, proves that they will be,
successful in whatever they do. Dr.
Bell quoted statistics from a recent
surveytwhich showed that only four
percent of students who have aI
grade of 85 are failures. Becausej
the question was raised about those
who have lower averages in schol-
arship, in the same test 125 sub-
jects were tested and it was found
that of them, all but two were
unsuccessful. Here at the Univer-
sity, she said, the percentage of
failures is from 12 to 15.
"The constant change in moral
attitudes," Dr. Bell continued, "is a
field where the intelligent action of]
ATHNAIS, INSTALLED'i

LSEY, SPEAK iAEEY0A PI'S ELIMYINATE

XsL% %J JLt mV1L a.I IZ
women would be felt as much as
any place today. Experimentation
is all righ-t, but it should be thought-
ful." Dr. Bell then pointed out that
health is essential to effective liv-
ing, and that the women of today
need more endurance than they
I have at present.
Physical education, she said, is a
profession that has unlimited op-
portunities for the idealistic teach-
er. She concluded her talk by say-
ing that she believed that the Uni-
versity of Michigan is as fine a
school as there is in the country
with as fine equipment as can be
found, and furthermore with the
spirit to lead.
Following the talk by Dr. Bell,
Miss Elizabeth Halsey, visiting pro-
fessor from Iowa State University,
spoke on sportsmanship as an
Anglo-Saxon tradition, contrasting
it with the fact that the children!
of the Near East, with whom she
has worked, have no such thing in{
their lives. "In teaching them
what sportsmanship meant," she
said, "it had to be translated into
concrete instances, so that the
children could understand it.
Miss Halsey said that there are
certain dangerous tendencies which
may destroy sportsmanship in this
country. One of these is commer-
cialism with all its tendencies to
destroy the advantage of the in-
dividual by the exploitation of the
individual for the man who holds
the purse strings. She closed her'
talk by saying that she hoped the
high school girls would go back to
their own schools and do all that
is possible to promote sportsm an-
Iship because it is one of the -great-

GAMMA PHIiiBETA -
Victors Score Quintet of luus in.
First Inning to Stop All
Argument
TO PLAY AGAIN FRIDAY
Showing a marked improvenient
over their Monday's performance,
Alpha Omicron Pi took Gamma Phi
Beta's ball team into camp 6-0 yes-
terday afternoon.
Getting under way in the second
half of the first stanza, trotted five
of their six counters across the
platter. Continuing the rally in the
second they nicked the Gamma Phi
twirler for three safeties, but only
one runner completed the ci cuit of
the bases.
The Gamma Phi sluggers solved
the delivery of G. Wilkinson for
several scorching two-baggers but
the runners were left stranded
without being able successfully to
round the hot corner. On their
only chance to score the runner
was hit by a batted ball between
third and home for the third out.
Alpha Xi Delta and Sigma Kappa
are- the 'only teams that have not
played the necessary three games
to enter the elimination series that
began today. This game will be
played Friday or Saturday. The sec-
and round of the elimination series
begins Friday with Delta Zeta en-
countering Alpha Epsilon Phi at
4 o'clock, :Chi Omega encountering
Alpha Omic-on Pi, Zeta'Tau Alpha
Betsy Barbour, and Martha Cook
Sigma Kappa at 5 o'clock, weather
permitting.

o 0
I Name Women's League Theater 1
( It is with unusual pleasure
that I announce the name of
I the Theatre in our beautiful I
building as the Lydia Mendels- LLA
| sohn Theatre. This memorial{
I was made possible by Gordon
I Mendelssohn of Birmingham, Group sports and an obstacle re-
Michigan, who gave the last fif- [#lay were the features of the Play-
I ty thousand dollars to the day held yesterday morning on
I League fund in memory of his
Mother, Lydia Mendelssohn. ;Palmer field for the delegates of
I Hereafter I trust that the Thea- the High School Girls' Sports Con-
I tre will be called at all times the I ference. This event put into action
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, the theory of inter-group competi-
Mrs. W. D. Henderson, I tion that has been stressed during
I Executive Secretary of the
Alumnae Council. the two-day meeting of the high
o _o__ school girls.
Following the outdoor competi-
Book And Print Shop tion, which was held from 9 to 11
Develops Policy Of l o'clock, the delegates were given a
two-hour rest period. At noon lunch-,
Encouraging Browsing wonwas served in the athletic
building. Marjory Davis of the Uni-
tudnts Patr eShop To Pr versity high school W. A. A., Helen
chase Biography, First Editions r Kemp, a visiting delegate from Flat
And Fine Etchings Rock, Miss Elizabeth Halsey, visit-
I ing professor from Iowa State Uni-
In a background of gray shelves versity, and Dr. Margaret Bell were
and dull green furniture are set the speakers for the occasion.
books, a great many books, in all The second series of group dis-1
manner of bright paper covers. Up- cussions about the play-day idea.
on the wall are several black and was held in the field house at 2:30.
white etchings. This is the Print Rose Strasser, '29. was general
and Book Shop. A low seat runs chairman for the entire conference.
around part of the room below the IHer committee heads were as fol-
shelves, and upon it are careless- lows: Program-Doris Renkenber-
y placed several children's books ger, '30Ed.; food-Frances Miller,
n French, a modern novel or two, 131; parties' - Arlienne Heilman,
a book of poetry, and several mis-'r'3Ed.; registration and guides-
ellaneous volumes. 1Frances Bielby, '30Ed.; reception
One of the policies of the Shop and transportation-Margaret Ohl-
s to have students feel at liberty Ison, '30; play-day-Herma Grab-
o come in and browse, and so owrsky, '30; invitations-Marjorie
treat are its attractions that they Muffley, '30Ed.; housing-Albertina
to it frequently When they stay I Maslen, '31; publicity-Mary Louise
o purchase, they usually choose Behymer, '30; secretary and treas-
poetry, art, biography, or one of urer-Elizabeth Whitney.
he classics, in preference to the
newer fiction. Quite a large num- feeding new material.
er of students are collectors of The Shop is quite proud of its
ne sort or another. Some collect etchings and prints. One of the
irst editions, while others have most recent acquisitions is C. Jac
lobbies which they are constantly Young's "Gulls, Rocks and Surf."

i
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The new ballroom is ninety-nine s 'A NTIfL lI[T
feet long and aslightly wider than'
' the one at the Union, . and cani
comfortably accommodate as many In an installation ceremony to,
couples as the Union. The long be held at 3 o'clock Saturday, May
windows on two sides of the room,1 18, in the new League building,
hung with brightly colored drapes, Athena Society will become the
add beauty and grace to the large Epsilon chapter of the national or-
room. The colored panes in the ganization of the same name. Mrs.
upper half othe windows are an I Harriet Mahnke, of Sioux City,
unusual and attractive feature in' Iowa, national president of the or-
such a room.j ganization, will be present 'at the
. Tickets for the League dances exercises. The present officers of
may be obtained at the main desk the society; Lois Webb, president,
in the League. Use of the entrance 'Eleanor Corywell, vice-president,
on North University as much as Ollie Backus, secretary, and Dor-
possible is requested, but not corn- othy Kirby, treasurer, will continue
pulsory. ;as officers of the new chapter.
SAfter the. installation tea will be
INTERCLASS BASEBALL served to the members in the
League toa-room.
IntercIass baseball begins today The purpose of the national or-
at 4:15. All women are invited to ganization of Athena is stated to
come out and root for their class. be the same as that of the local-
The scorers are requested to re- society-to promote literary and
port at the field house at .4 o'clock scholastic interests and to carry on
promptly. ;debating.

est

traditions of our national life.

k

W iI

L,4./
Distinctive
Apparel

--

Carroliton, Texas
} May 15, 1928
Latus & Bro. Co.,
Richmo"d, Va.
Gentlemen:
Having .beenL a user of Edgeworthi
for over eight years, I can truthfully
say that it is the best on earth. I am
enclosing a little ditty that I believe
expresses my sentiments entirely:
Old Man Joy and Old Man Trouble
Went out for a walk one day.
I happened to pass when they met
on the street
And I overheard them say,
Said Old Man Trouble, "She's as
wrong as she can be,
There ain't no fun in anything to
me, why
I4 was just talking' to Old Man
Sorrow,
And he says the world will end
tomorrow."
Then Old Man Joy lie started to
grin,
And I saw him bring out that
OLD BLUE TIN,
Then OLD JOHNNY BRIAR was
next on the scene,
And he packed him full from the
OLD BLUE TIN,
Aid I heard him say as he walked
away,
"You have to have a smoke screen
every day.
When a man gets the blues, and he
needs a friend,
He can find consolation in the OLD
And I jist don't BLUE TIN,
.andI fst dn'tbelieve on all this
aa.irf 1

SPECIAL SELLING OF
125 New Hats
EVERY HAT IS SMART!
EVERY HAT IS NEW!
The hats incued in this special selling are exclusively shown
by such importers as HYLAND, HODGE, DORANN,
They are fashioned of BANKOK, BAKOU, BALLY
FELTS, HAIR CROCHET.
Formerly Price from $15.00 to $20.00f

Thursday, Friday and Saturday
EVENT EXTRAORDINARY

\ (A
r f

Little Gifts for Graduation
That Will Surely Please
The Graduate will welcome these season-
able and charming accessory gifts.
SCARFS cut in the new way add a bright spot to the costume.
DAINTY BITS OF NECKWEAR are smartest when of lace.
COSTUME JEWELRY in the new modernistic designs.
EXQUISIT LINGERIE!
HOSIERY in every new shade to match the costume.
HAND BAGS very smartly designed with a most interesting top.
Nothing could be smarter than 'the exquisite LACE AND LINEN
HANDKERCHIEF and for day time a beautiful collection of gay
printed Handkies.
UMBRELLAS always anacceptable gift.
The C0111nsShoppe
Exclusive but not Expensive
LIBERTY AT MAYNARD
1= d
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that selects this shoe
is "footwise" too
for no smarter pat-'
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- any gTaduate
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- SEVEN EIGHTYFIE
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WHITE
MAUVE
SIX EIGETYITYVE BLUE
SSTBLONDE

Fine Coats-
Selected from our Regular Stock
SPORT COATS
DRESS COATS
SILK COATS

All are tip to the
of quality, style
SPECIAL AT

Jacobson's standard
and workmanship.
$ 39*75

11

SUITS
At jaunty as they are smart-in chic
tailored modes, with finger tip length
jackets and wrap around skirts.
Ideally correct for street and travel
wear.

SPECIAL AT

$9.75

II 1ill

11 11

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