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February 17, 1929 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-02-17

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Ar

jARY 17, 1929

THE MIC HIGAN

DAILY,

............. .

PENN FOOTBALL TEAMINDIANA TEAMS,
~WII I Pit L L T WILL BE BUS

Y

0

;[I 1... B1L [.I I I II*~JPa IIrJe 9
Badgers And Pennsylvania Sign,
Contracts For Grid Games
In 1930 And 1931
DATES ARE NOT SELECTEDI
(Special To nie Deily>)
MADISON, Wis., Feb. 16-Wiscon-
sin will meet the University of
Pennsylvania in football on a home
and home basis in the years 1930
and 1931, according to an an-
niouncement made here today bye
'lead Coach Glenn F. Thistle-
thwaite. This series marks the
first intersectional gridiron compe-
tition with the east since 1899 when
the Badgers were defeated by Yale,
6-0.

Ernest B. Cozens and Geo. E. Lit-
tle, athletic directors of the two in-I
sittutions, completed negotiations
by long distance telephone. Ap-
proval by the Wisconsin athletic
council was not necessary inasmuch
as they had authorized early last
fall an intersectional football series
with 'one of the leading eastern
schools.
Penn iTo Come West
In all probability, the Penn,
eleven will appear at Camp Randall
stadium 'rn some date during the
Wal of 1930, the exact Saturday to
be 'agreed upon later. The contract
wi1l take the Badgers to Franklin
Field, Philadelphia, the following
year. Coaches Lou Young and
Gleih Thistlethwaite were very en-
thusiastic at the success of the two
directors in arranging all details
for the Wisconsin-Pennsylvania
agreement.
The scheduling of the University
of Pennsylvania culminates a de-
sire on the part of Director Little
and Coach Thistlethwaite, to enter
into a home and home agreement
with a strong eastern school. Ne-
gotiations were started with Penn
last summer when Little made a
trip east to interview the officials
of several different institutions as
regards instituting a football re-
lationship.
Other Games Considered
"There will be further negotia-
.ions between the University of
Pennsylvania and ourselves which
may bring the two schools together
in other varsity sports," stated Mr.
Little.
It is understood that the author-
Ities are giving consideration to a
home and home series in two or
three other sports which would also
be held during the years 1930-31.

I BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Feb. 16.--
Indiana University's basketball,
swimming, and wrestling teams
will have a strenuous week of Big
Ten competition starting Monday
night with the Purdue-Indiana re-
turn basketball game at Lafayette.
Northwestern's wrestlers will come
here Friday. The Chicago natators
and the Illini netmen will invade
ythe Hoosier camp on the following
Sday.
The high light on the home pro-
gram this week will be the Indiana-
Illinois basketball game. Illinois
was the first Big Ten foe that de-
feated Indiana since it won the co-
championship of the Conference
last season. Coach Craig Ruby's
net artists have been pointing to-
ward the Indiana game with the
intention of giving themselves a
boost upward in the Conference
standing again at Indiana's ex=
pense.
On the same day Chicago's swim-
mers will invade the Hoosier tank
for a dual meet. The Maroon-
Crimson contest will be staged in
the afternoon in order that the
fans may get to see the basketball
game that night.
The Hoosier swimmers have made'
one of the best pre-Conference sea-
son records this year, and should
give the Maroons a hard battle for I
first places. Many new men are
proving their worth by, winning
first places in the meets so far this
year.
JUNIOR VARSITY ENDS
00D VEAR ON OURT
I 'E
(Continued From Page Six)
part of the year, and for that rea-
son have very often been away on
trips when the Junior Varsity has
scheduled games, but have played
in the majority of the contests, and
thus have gained valuable experi-
ence which will be of great advan-
tage to them when positions on the
Varsity team become vacant..
Awards for the work which the
players have done will be an-
nounced after the present Varsity
schedule has been completed, as
some of the players who have been
performing with the "B" five may
get Varsity awards. In addition
several of the members of the "B"
squad are expected to remain out
to help get the Varsity in condi-
tion for the rest of their hard
schedule, since the yearling bas-
keteers, who have been scrimmag-

Varsity To Play Two
Games With Badgers
(Continued From Page ,ix)
sin team sonsists of Meiklejohn at
center and Kreuger and Seigal at
forward positions. Both Kreuger
and Seigal possesses eagle eyes at
( shots at the net while Captain
Meikeljohn is one of the cleverest '
puck handlers in the West. Thom-'
sen and G. Meiklejohn hold regu-
lar positions at left and right de-
fense.
Squad Will Compete
At Meet In Detroit
(Continued From Page Six)
Randolph Monroe was a disappoint-
ment, running far behind the
leaders..
A sprint dual was waged between
TDolan and Murray at 50 and 60
yards, Tolan emerging victorious
in each race. The Seymour
twins also ran a brotherly race
over 'a 300 yard distance, Dale beat-
ing Dalton by a few feet.
Coach Charles Hoyt put his yearl-
ing~ trackmen through some tire
trials. McLaughlin captured the
half mile in 2:02.6 with Worden
second. In the mile event Fitz-
gibbons outran Wolf to take first
in :54.5 seconds. Chase was second.
Lansdale proved to be the best of
the .two milers, covering the dis-
tance in 10:53. McCormack and
Shelton followed him to the tape.
WOLVERINES FACE
ILLINI TOMORROW
(Continued From Page Six)
tion against the Illini during the
greater part of the game. Other-
wise the Michigan mentor will test
his reserves. He has Kanitz, a cap-
able forward, Barley who can
qualify. either as a forward or a
guard, and Cushing and Lovell,
guards, to, insert into the lineup
in case they are needed.
While the Wolverines were able
to check the scoring activities of
Harper and How, the Orange and
Blue sharp-shooters, in the game
played here as well as those of May,
Illinois, Captain Dorn and Doug
Mills proved thorns in the sides
of the Michigan defense all eve-
ning, accounting for 12 of their
team, points between them. The
Wolves must stop this pair and
solve the famed Illini short pass-
ing attack if they expect to repeat
their former success tomorrow
night.
ing the Varsity often, are due to
stop practice at the end of this,
week.
Prospects for the "B" team next
year are very bright according to r
Coach Courtright, since only two
positions and possibly one will be
open in the Varsity line-up, this
placing several of the members of
the p~resent strong freshman team l
at his disposal. -

.S4#r rrrsrt ~rrrrrrrrr..urr .#frurrrrr........Ms ~ rrf.. . . .. . rltfetu.s. .. !

*1~

CLEANERS of QUALITY
Our Prices-Risky to Pay Less
Needless to Pay More

i.

000

2

YOLi SIt
" at i N~sr
10M I Kil,

N
E

CLASSIFIED
A DVE RTISING
VIOLINS-Collection of rare old
Italian, French and German vio-
lins on display at 215 E. Wash-
ington St. for one week. Now is
the time to get a good old violin.
Reasonable. 98,99,1Q0
NOTICE-Girl will share home in
southeast section with two girls,
or man and wife. Reasonable
rent. References. Phone 22337.
98,99,100
NOTICE-Dial 3916, Moe Laundry
204 N. Main St., for laundry serv-l
ice with real personal attention
like received at home. c
TYPING-Theses a specialty. Fair
rates. M. V. Hartsuff, Dial 9387.
c
TYPEWRITER SERVICE - New
Corona, Royal, Underwood, Rem-
ington portables, also used large
and portable typewriters of all
makes boughtand sold, rented,
exchanged, cleaned, repaired.
Large stock, best service, consid-
erate prices.' Phone 6615. O. D.
Morrill, 17 Nickels Arcade.

NOTICE-Beautiful
Axminister and
Koch & Henne.

F
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4

A
E
all
omp any
'The. llom . o f E n e r
C. H. SCHROEN
....... . . . . .. ............................................................

WANTED - Woman of experience
to take charge of sandwich mak-
ing. Phone 5617. Ask for R. B.
Evans. 100,101,102
WANTED-Four girls for sandwich
Making. Phone 5817. Ask for
D. W. Smith. 100,101,102
WANTED--Ten boys with, delivery
carts or bicycles equipped with
carriers for delivery work be-
tween 9 and 11 p'. m. Phone 517.
Ask for D. W. Smith. 101,1,2

{

Re ad the Classified Ads

-/

P - .. .
V 111
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+il
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-
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..

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1
1

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FOR RENT-A suite for two men
students. 502 East Ann. Dial
7719. 100,12
POR, RENTFront b-room suite;
well lighted; one bedroom. For
students or business people. 909
E. Washington. Phone 9910. 100
FOR RENT-Large front suite, 12
blocks from Campus. For two, or
will rent as single. Phone. 3840.
98, 99, 100
FOR RENT-Double front room
private family, steam heat, will
lighted, reasonable rates. 1106
Forest. C
FOR RENT - Choice living room
and bedroom, well fulnished and
airy. Private and quiet. 344 Lib-
erty Court. 99,100
FOR RENT-Suite-study room with'
sleeping porch. Call evenings. 334
E. Jefferson St. 99,100.
FOR RENT-Desirable rooms near
Campus. 429 South Division.
99,100
FOR RENT-One large suite for 2
or 3 students, and one single or
double room. Price reasonable.
Also garage. 425 S. Division.
2-2352. 99,100,101
FOR RENT-Desirable suite. Very
reasonable. Dial 8194. 99,100,101
FOR RENT-Two pleasant rooms
that may be used single, double,
or as a suite. 509 S. Division.
99,100
F O R R E N T - Single room for
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girl. Steam heat. 422 E. Wash-
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FOR RENT-A completely fur-
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apartment. Steam heat, bath in-
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E. Washington. Dial 8544 or ,9714.
99,100

Hotftumpet
Sock it!
TIr saxophones noan. The trumpets trump.
TPhe cornets corn. And the fellow who plays the
piano should have been an acrobat ! That's the
kind of an aggregation which gets real music out
of dumb animals at a dance.
And real music makes even the best dancer
thirsty. All right! Go over in the corner by the
palml trees and quench your thirst with "Canada
Dry." This ginger ale has a delightful flavor .
tang to it . . . dryness . . . sparkle. It his a
subtle gingery flavor because it is made from pure
Jamaica ginger. It contains no capsicum (red
pepper), and nola bene it blends well with other
beverages:
CANADA 1 R
,la.. . . ata . l
"The Champagne of C9inger e-les"
Extract imported from Canada and bottled in the U. S. A. by
C anaD nv ;r A e I.Inrororatd 25 West 43rd Street. New York. N. '.

Style that Brig
the Stadiun
\Q f
~~ifrI
year-you'll ses a sea andrs(ar er
s s yr
E'acii year the gay, 'A'
that 'fill the stadiums become morec
year you'll see a new and smarteras
tinguishes all Alligator models. Tbe
gators are far ahead, combining the m
y thought in line and fabric. Feather
Iness, :lined or unlined, in a wide rai
models. Absolutely waterp roof
dlrc..ciing rain, and boulevard sinai
weather wear. Alligators are sold on.
stores anid retail :from $7.50 to $25.
new Alligator Aviation model at;
Alligator Company, St. Louis, Mo.

1

htens

a
,, - a

FOR SALE-Highest offer takes
Vega banjo, excellent condition,
with new head. Phone 9842; 228
S. Thayer. 100,1
COST
LOST-Vauabie papers in manil
folder rmarked "Carr: Sociology."
Probably left in campus building

/

etant 'crowds
colorful. This
style that dis-
ese new Alli.
nost advanced
rweight light-
nge of smart
in the most
rtness for fair
ly at the best
.00. See the
$19010. The

I

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