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April 30, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-30

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PAM t
i

'THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

r
TUESDAY APRIL 30, 1929

y __ - ___TESDY-ARIL30,192

BSHOP CONTRIBUTE^Dr. Carl Guthe Will
BISHP CNT -BUTDiscuss Architecture

OND ERONK TO TALK
ON FAMINE IN CHINA,

ARTICLE ON PUTNAMJ1
PCLTII
HkAD OF UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
HAS CURRENT ARTICLE
IN JOURNAL
ALSO EDITED ESSAYS
Proaminent Men Contributed Work
Presented To Putnam On
30th Anniversary
William W. Bishop, University Li-
brarian, features as leading con-
tributor to the latest isue of the L -
bry Journal with an articleon
Herbert Putnam for 30 years head
of the Library of Congress. Libra-'
rian Bishop terms Putnam one of
the two great librarians of Con-
gress unswervingly devoted to the
task of making the Library of Con-
gress truly national.
It is due to his ability that this
library of four million'ooks has not
become a mere governmental ma-
chine. "It is humanized and vivi-.
fied by real persons working on real
problems", writes Librarian Bishop.

Dr. Carl E. Guthe, associate di-
rector of the University museum of
anthropology, will deliver an illus-'
trated lecture on "Mayan Archi-
tecture" at 4:15 this afternoon in
the auditorium of the architectural
building. The lecture is being
sponsored by the Architectural so-
ciety.
The speaker is a prominent arch-
aeologist and one of the foremost
authorities on Indian pottery. Dr.
Guthe has made expeditions to
Mexico, Hawaii, and throughout
sixteen states of the Mississippi
valley.
He is chairman of the committee
on state archaeological survey of
the national research council, and
has charge, of correlating the re-
search work in archaelogy done
all over North America. Dr. Guthe
was recently elected president of
the newly organized Washtenaw
Historical society.
STATE ORCHESTRA
PROVES AMERICAN
Check Of Parentage Of High School
Musicians Is Made; Extreme
Youth Characteristic

Will

Discuss Chinese
With Y. E. Chang
Public Address

Problems
In

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"Herein lies the distinction of Her-
bert Putnam-the librarian." "American" homes produce most4
Not only is Mr. Bishop author of of Michigan's young musicians, ac-1
an article on Librarian Putnam but cording to a chart of nationalities
he is also joint editor of a volume represented in the state high school
on his work entitled, "Essays Offer- orchestra, which played here before
ed to Herbert Putnam by his Col- the Michigan Schoolmasters club
leagues and Friends on His 30th last week. Exceptional youth also
Anniversary as Librarian of Con- characterized the group as a whole,'
gress." The book was written in as shown by a second chart, while,
co.aboration with Andrew Keogh itill another showed that most of
aid presented to Mr. Putnam by Li- the youthful players itend to fol-
brarian on April 5 at a testimonial low music as a vocation.
dinner in Washington) English Parents Are Second
The volume consists of essays on Of the 166 musicians from 44 dif-
the Congressional Library and Mr. "erent Michigan communities, ap-
Putnam's work, contributed by 61 proximately two-thirds are of Am-
writers who include such prominent erican born parentage. The fathers,
mgen as Senators Fess, Burton and of 97 and the mothers of 99 are
Gillett, Melvil Dewey, R. R. Bowker, listed thus. English stock was in-
ex-ambassador Jusserand, Monsig- dicated for 11 fathers and 16 moth-
norTiserat o th Vaica Lira ers, while the German stock just
r Tisserant of the Vatican Libra- reversed the figure, with 16 fathers
ry, Sir Frederick Kenyon, Dlr.' Hugo
Kniss, Roland-Marcel and other and e1mothers.
me both within and out the ext in number represented were
notedary nwod. hi ad. utthjiewish, with six of this stock. Other
eDr.nationalities represented in the or-
Since DedPutnam's appointment chestra include Polish, French,
Lo.ar the ead of the Congressidnal uiigarian, Russian, Canadian,
rary i 1899, the library has Dutch, Austrian, Bohemian, Swe-
grown to include fourdmillion books, dish, Negro, Italian, Irish, and Nor-,
two million maps and manuscripts' wegian. The same numbers of fa-}
and thousands of folios, prints and thers and mothers were represented
i.V le gifts have in all the last named stocks.
been received as the Harkness his- Ages Vary Greatly
torical collection and the Folger The ages of the players varied
Shakespeare library. That all this considerably, although but one
should be so readily available to member of the orchestra had,
both the nation and its thousands reached the age of 20. As opposed
of libraries is due to the work of to this, the youngest member of the
1*erbert Putnam. orchestra was but 12 years old. It
is believed that he played the base
ichgan Graduates viol. Five members of the orches-
Bank~slt~ts fitra were 13, twelve 14, and thirty-
Gain Bank Positions a-
hie were 15. The age of 16 wasl
most common, claimed by 45, andj
(iBY AssoeiatOd Press) there were 42 who were 17. Oddly{
SAGINAW, April 29.-Michigan enough but 18 were 18 years of age,
alumni had a field day here last lond three, 19.
week-end when the Second Nation- Futurepe, oc9b
al bank reorganized its official per- Future professions chosen by tie
sonnel. R. Perry Shorts, '06L., was cayn, wereied by that Tfamui-
promted rom ice-resien cioan, indicated by 101. Teaching
prmoe frm vice-prsident to wasnext on the list, although only
preidet. ohnJ. pener,'83.,15 chose this vocation. Business
Who has been in charge of the sav- ani ergineering each had five ad-!
ings department, was made an as- vocates, journalism four, and law
sistant cashier, and John A. Stew- and medicine three apiece. Further
art. '21, heretofore note teller, was preferences were divided between
a.tso made an assistant cashier Ithe callings of the hotel manager,
Shorts, named president of the l foredgn buyer, advertiser, aviator,
batik, was~ a ' successful candidate pht rmacist and dentist.f

DROUGHT IS WIDESPREAD'
In view of the terrible famine
which is every day claiming more
victims in overpopulated China, Y.{
E. Chang, Grad., and Dr. F. S.
Onderdonk, of the Architectural,
school, will hold a meeting at 4:15,
Thursday, May 2, in Natural Science
auditorium to discuss "America's
Soul and China's Famine". The!
object of these lec.tures is to stir up
more activity in aiding these star-
vation-stricken people by citizens
of this nation.
Chang, who did much relief work
in China during the 1920-1921 fa-
mine, will tell of the conditions that
existed there at that time and con-
trast them with those existing at
present. It is said by American au-j
thorities in China now that no de-
vastation such as this has ever be-
fore been so wide-spread.
In its most desolating form, thel
famine since the beginning of win-
ter has afflicted 12,000,000 men, wo-
men, and children in nine provinces
of North China alone. In that
area, that total, according to train-
ed investigators who are in close
touch with the conditions, will
reach a minimum of 20,000,000 be-'
fore summer.
Continued drought in many re-
gions, floods, locust swarms, a
plague of army earth worms, civil
war and brigandage combined to
leave in this vast expanse of terri-
tory only a small fraction of the
food necessary to maintain the life
of the population until another har-
vest. Civil war is now ended and
brigandage is largely controlled, but
food is still lacking.
President Hoover, in writing on
the situation, said, "The reports of
the Department of Commerce indi-
cate a very real famine in China
from which many million people are,
already suffering. The American
people have never failed to respond
to a call of charity in time of need.
"I wish to commend the effort
of the China Famine Relief fund in
its attempt to bring this aid to a
most unfortunate people and I trust
it will meet with generous support.'

Contributions Pourf
SMANY SUBMIT PAPRS News From Other Colleges
I Replies to the appeal for FreshII UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA.- MICHIGAN STATE COLLEGE.-
Air camp funds sent out by the Students on this campus will lead State police were called to stop a
Student Christian association are a spotless life if plans advocated by sophomore-freshman fight that de-
already being received from house Number of Manuscripts Increases the local Y. M. C. A. are carried veloped from a river-ducking suf
organizations on the campus, it! as Closing Date Of Contest.n dlredfrarne rukn th
was announced at Lane hall yester- Draws Near out. These plans include the aboli- fered by some sophomores at the
day. Thirty dollars is being ask- Ijtion of all hazing, doing away with hands of certain members of the
ed from each house this year to IETAY DEAET AS the freshman pot, compulsory Bible freshman class.
make the drive a success, and all study on Sunday mornings in the
organizations that have not al- Manuscripts in the Thomas E. H., front rooms of fraternities, and UNIVERSITY OF DAKOTA.-A
ready replied are urged to do so as Maucit
soon as possible. A general drive Black New Testament oratorical curtailing "drinking, jazz, and joy- freshman on the campus here holds
will be held on the campus on contest, which closes on Wednes- riding" in general. the record for commuting to
Wednesday, May 8. day, May 1, have been coming in to classes-he travels 70 miles every
The counselors chosen from the the speech department with in- UNIVERSITY OF BOMBAY- week end to and from the univer-
student body for the camp at La easing rapidity during the past Amon *d e s ted
Ptesnthis summer will Lae three days. Prof. Richard D. T. on htndelissnsitd sity.
Hollisterof the department in by Indian students in a question-
,James McDowell, '29, Marshall H.IDAA UIERIY a
'30 charge of the contest; is receiving aire distributed recently were eat- INDIAN UNIVERSITY. -Law
Edwin O. Reischauer, '31 Palmer 'several additions each day to the I ing cow's flesh, refusing to marry and Medic students have decided to
Beebe '31 and Walter Gaveme large number already turned in,t one's father's command, travel- bury the hatchet and hold a dance
Lee tonsfter omnd rvl D. Van Antwerp, '31M, will act the incentive of the $100 prize forinbogte.Teruehsen
asD. camp doctr 'h direc ofthe $50 price for ing by train without a ticket, and cared for the purpose of "frater-
the camp will be Homer H. Graf- second proving attractive among ,copying during an examination. nalizing and dancing."
ton, general secretary of the S. C Michigan students. Third place '
A.n, whienterasscite irtorh w. winner will receive a fine edition of
A.,b while the associate diretors will e
be Laverne H Taylor, '30, and By- iThe contesting manuscripts are
ron 0. Hughes, Spec. being written on any subject per- The Art of h Films
taining to or taken from the New I r
Government Reports Testaient, and speeches of notN
more than 15 minutes in duration
Auto Death Increases will be begun in the preliminary E TODAY ONLY
judging on Monday, May 6. Each
The United States may be turn- I contestant will render his own
ing to aeroplanes for transporta- speech, according to the rules of
tion, but it makes little difference the contest, the' final judging of G e,
in the number of deaths occurring which will take place on May 19 in
from automobile accidents, accord- the First Methodist Chureh.
the Firs MeToodit Church
ing to statistcis collected by the Last year's winner was Lawrence I
f Department of Commerce. Figures Hartwig, '31, while Robert Gessner,
show that in 78 large cities in the '29, captured titular honors in 1927.
United States 523 deaths were re- Although there has been an in-
ported from automobile accidents creasing enthusiasm in past years
during the four weeks ending toward the contest, this year's com-
April 21, 1928. Most of these deaths petition has been keener than at
were the result of accidents which any time since the prizes were of-
occurred within city limits. fered. The subject of the orations
For the 52 week periods ending has caused the committee inocharge
April 20, 1929, and April 21, 1928, to select a church for the final
the totals for the 78 cities were re- judging, a more appreciate audi-
spectively, 7,659 and 7,221 which in- ende being hoped for than could
dicate a recent rate of 23.3 per be obtained in ordinary public
100,000 population as against an Ibuildings.
earlier rate of 22:4 or an increase
of 4 per cent in the rate in a sin- UNIVERSITY OF DENVER.-A
gle yea r re o et professor of psychology maintains
Six cities reported no deaths from that nme out of ten co-eds come
automobile accidents for the last to college to secure a husband
four weeks, and the same number; rather than an education.
of cities reported no deaths from
automobile accidents for the cor- PORTABLETe
responding period in 1928. j TYPEWRITERS
We have all rpakes. Burning of Rome
NEW HAVEN.-English is the Iten ington, Royals.
most valuable college subject andI Corona, Underwood
Psychology is the least valuable, ac-. Colored duco finishes. Price $60.
cording to the majority vote of Q. D.MORRIiLL
tjYale seniorse 17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615' 7

I
+r
! ,
,..

"'

s

Detroit Theaters
LAFAYETTE
SHUBERT
THURSTON
The Famous Magician
and his daughter Jane
Prices: Nights, Sat. and Sunday
Mats., 50c, $1 and $1.50

-4-r
,.,.

IF a girl stays out aft(
around - if she does
If she kisses she's "1o
the loser.
If shesattends wild p
right kind of a lhusba
won't get any at all

as Pert Kelly says
er midnight, she's a run-
n't she's a wallflower.
ose." If she doesn't she's
arties, she won't get the
and -- if she doesn't she
E.

1

CASS THEATRE
Orly Mat. Saturday $1 to $3.50
Nights . $1 to $3.50
BEATRICE LILLIE
THIS YEAR OF GRACE
Subscribe to The Daily

3:35
35c
10c
7:00
8A0
400
-100

So--WHY BE
GOOD?
With
NEIL HA MIL TON

'Ii

for Regent of the .Univgrsity this
spring on the Republican ticket. His
nomination, along with that of
Walter H. Sawyer, veteran member
of the Board of Regents, was
obtained by interested alumni.
DALLAS, Texas.-Hazing must
end at Texas A. and M. college or
the doors of the institution will bek
closed, according to Judge Byrd!
white, a member of the board of
regents of the college.

r I... ,' ., .

NOW!

AESOP'S
FABLE
ART AND
BEAUTY

APPOINTMENTS
Our Gang
HOUSE"

PARAMOUNT
NEWS
MAJESTIC
ORvJHESTRA

I

Seen Nothin' Yet"

__ __ __ _ __ __z
STARTING WEDNESDAY

OT TILL YOU

SEE THIS SHOW
--AL JOLSON

in

I

Send Gifts that
last
They cost so little but
mean so much to her on
Mother's Day.
A wonderful line of Moth-
er's Day Greeting Cards.

with
Leatrke Joy CIhde Cook

'#

:.

THE ART &
GIFT SHOP
218 S. State St.

a 'R
'I, , o '- \'
4vlv *

One-Third Off
on
FURS AND
FUR COATS
Made Up, Remodeled,
Relined and Repaired

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IF

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11 A A.W.14- . 1.11II

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