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April 28, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-28

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P AGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UNIDAY, APRIL 28, 1929,

-m

PROBLEMS PRESENTED,
AT TEACERS ESSIsON
ARTHUR FIELD, GRAD., OUT-
LINES PUBLIC SCHOOL
COURSES
O6IWRAPHY IS LACKING
Subject Has "Squeezed By" in Cur-
ricula Of Preparatory Schools
In British Isles
"Up to the present time Geog-
raphy in the Public schools of Eng-
land has just squeezed by," was
the characterisation of the teach-
ig of the subject made to the
Geography teachers of the state
yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock in
223 Angell hall by Arthur Field,
Gad., who is associated with the
Geography department of the Uni-
Versity on a Riggs fellowship.
In the course of his short talk
on the subject Field outlined the
educational system of England as
consisting of the Elementary, Sec-
ondary, and Public schools. These
last two are practically the same,
and the last of them is more or less
identical with the college prepara-
tory schools of this country. The
Public schools, which are not at all
public, prepare especially for the1
great universities of . Oxford and;
Cambridge.
Some 60 years ago, said Fields,
Geography was not a subject at
all; it was a mere catalogue of
names. The first thing that was
taught was a list of the rivers along
the English coastline, and after
that came more lists of names. If
the student could say these back-
wards and forwards, he knew his
geography, and that was all there
was to it.
Then several years ago the Royal
Geographic Society investigated
the situation and discovered that,
whereas continental uni'versities
had professors in the subject,
neither Oxford nor Cambridge had
even considered such a person.
When they tried to have a course
irstalled, their efforts met with
complete failure. This was due to
the fact that the Public schools of-
fered scholarships in the classical
subjects but neglected the sciences.
Finally, however, they were able
to influence the Public schools in
such a way that they began to
stress Geography as a course, and,
as the result of a second petition,
there is to be one scholarship
awarded in this subject in the High
Certificate exaninations.

ALUMNI MOVE TO PROTECT SENIORS
FROM HANDS OF WILY EMPLOYERS

No longer will the deceiving busi-
ness man be able to inveigle the
Michigan senior into a job under,
false pretenses, no longer will thel
graduate be prevailed upon be-f

cause of his lack of knowledge of
employment conditions-at least it
is hoped that this will be true with
the creation of personnel secre-
taries in 50 cities throughout the
country where University of Mich-
igan clubs flourish.4

In marked contrast
tions in the past when
mention of "jobs for
graduates" caused cold

to condi-a
the mere
Michigan
chills to

traverse the spine of the secretary
of the alumni club, it now seems
highly probable that the organiza-
tion which is being set up will soon
be able 'to actually provide posi-
tions in addition to the numerous
compilations of statistics which1
they are already able to provide.
The well-oiled machinery is being
modelled after specifications sug-
gested by the National Alumni,
Committee on Placement headed{
by Frederic W. Willard, '06, of NewI
York City. This committee made
its first report at the second Alum-
ni Triennial in Chicago last May.
The University, through its vari-
ous placement bureaus, is coper-
ating with the alumni in the build-
ing up of this organization and the
contact between the two groups

will be made through Willard E.
Parker, '23, Executive Secretary of
the University Committee on Voca-
tional Guidance and Placement un-
til further arrangements are com-
pleted.
Information relative to employ-
ment conditions or firms in this
city which are seeking Michigan
men are two of the principal duties
which the Personnel secretary will
be expected to fulfill. His other
important task at the present time
will be to welcome new graduatesi
arriving in his district and to, pro-I
vide them with proper social and
business introductions and aid them
in any way in which they may
need help to become well establish-
ed in the community. Of the fifty
secretaries already appointed many
are and have been officers of Uni-
yersity of Michigan clubs and of
the General Alumni association,
Strings .. Supplies
Repairs
for all Musical Instruments
SchaOe &Son
MUSIC HOUSE
110 S. Main St.

tific

expedition for the coming i various cities of the East.

summer to points in Georgia and
Alabama.
Edwin P. Creaser, assistant in
the division of ' crustaceans, H.
R. Becker, of Climax, Michigan,
and Manuel Kanuto, assistant in
the bird division, will leave in Aug-
ust and will remain until the last
'TQare~

1

At Worcester, Mass., he played
in All Saints Episcopal church; at
Princeton University he played in
the new chapel there, this recital
marking his sixth appearance at
the New Jersey institution. He al-
so played in the North Baptist
ehureh at Camden N J. Mr Chris-

Lafayette
at Shelby

AFAYETTE
THEATREE

Cadillac
8705

MUSE[UM WILL DIRECT
Announcement has been made of
another University Museums scien-

University Organist 1
Completes Two Week
Recital Trip In East,
Palmer Christian, University or-)
ganist, has returned to Ann Arbor
after a two week's recital trip in.

tian gave two recitals in New York
city, appearing for the fifth time
in the Wanamaker auditorium. His
second New York recital was given
in the famous old St. George's Epis-
copal church on Stuyvesant square
where he played on the new J. Pier-
pont Morgan Memorial organ.
Mr. Christian will resume the
Wednesday afternoon recital in
Hill auditorium at 4:15 o'clock, May

. ci bptember. luula alul, 1.a VI lla
.Ii111111(liill1111111111111111111 (i1T11 11111I1111 t Nlltlil11 l111lIIIFillllltt11 t1[ 1111,i-
Dinner Today
Chickeri or Steak
with everything
Save Money=.
with Meal Tickets
- COOPER'S KITCHENETTE
FAMOUS FOR FOOD
Over Slaters
11 ttliiil iillllllllllll lllll lilllllll(Ill nillll111 11hI T l IIII t11ili intII 1 1ttI 11 n

BEGINNING SUNDAY NIGHT, APRIL 28
Matinees-Thursday, Saturday and Sunday
23rd-ANNUAL DETROIT ENGAGEMENT-23rd
The Greatest of All Entertainers
The Famous Magician
AND HIS DAUGHTER JANE
Singing and Dancing Comedienne
FORTY NEW MYSTERIES THIS SEASON
See "IASIA" The Sensation of the Age
A Flesh and Blood Woman Vanishes from the Dome of the
Theatre Over the Heads of tht Audience
See "The Vanishing Whippet Car and 10 Pretty Girls"

8. He will present the following
program:
Overture to "Tannhauser" by Wag-
ner, and "To the Evening Star,"
by Wagner; Sonata No. 1, (Allegro
maestoso, Andante, Allegro con-
fuoco) by Berowski; Sketch in D
flat by Schumann; Prelude to "TYae
Blessed Damozel" by Debussey-
Christian: and Finale tsymphony
1.) by Vierne.

f1 ._....

The Art

of the Films

Want Ads Pay

PRICES:

Nights, Saturday and Sunday Mats., 50c, $1 and $1.50
Popular Thursday Matinee, 50c, 75 and $1

L

The Flaming Youth Girl in 1929
Flaming Youth Story!
E GOOD?
With
NEIL HAMILTON
A
William A. Seiter
Production
POLICY
1:25 - 3:00
4:
7:00 - 8:40
Sac - lac
Appointiients
Our Gang Comedy
"CRAZY HOUSE"

's

T" /"l. /.y

W. 0 -. o -. 00. WOO WOO a C '.O.'oO.W'o

I

A Romance of Young Bllood,
Its Throbs and Thrills. .

.......

A
and

CHAMP of the squared circle meets a winner among
girls . . . he makes an amazing decision
then the thing happens that you'd never guess.

Breezy Bill Haines was just made for the role of the gen-
tleman prize-fighter! And you'd give up fame and for-
tune, too, if beautiful Joan Crawford was the girl of your
heart! You'll cheer those fight scenes! You'll roar at the
pranks of college life! You'll say this is one picture in a
hundred!

Highest Cash Prices
Paid for Your
Discarded Clothing
CLAUDE BROWN
Phone 6616
115 E.Ann St.

SEE
Colleen's hot dance that
wins the dancing contest!
"The Bailer," most unusual
road -house you've ever
seen!
Society's jazziest whoopee
Party !

I
ti
I ,ti
I
I
I

.$5
- {
i

JOAN CRAWFORD
KARL DANE

AESOP'S
FABLE

PARAMOUNT
NEWS

ART AND
BEAUTY

Majestic Orchestra-Ken Osbarne, Organ

Styles that are
of Paris!
Backgrouid of
Settings!

railes ahead
modernistic

COMING SOON
THE BELLAMY TRIAL-ALL=STAR CAST

1' _.

'4

He quit the prize-ring because of a
girl-but it was the prize-ring that won
her for him at last!

11

at sw"
cam dqof
coznypus and
prize-rings!f

I ON THE STAGE-1
Joe PARSONS 1111 FRANK DOBSON & CO.

III]U

11

I

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