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April 28, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-28

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ESTABLISHED
1890

73J

t r

4

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
-PRESS,

Vol. XXXIX, No. 152. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 28, 1929.

EIGHT PAGES

llnTrn TInrfll m AllI LEGISLATOR'S PLAN WOULD MAKE

101Wu

I NLULUWbiII

WILL SPEAK TIODAYI
INHILL'AUDTOIUM
DR. BLACK OF UNION SEMINARY
TO ADDRESS STUDENTS
THIS MORNING
WHITE UNABLE TO APPEAR
Speaker, Native Of Scotland, Holds
Honorary Degrees And Is
Author Of Several Books
Hugh Black of Union Theologicalj
seminary will address the final stu-
dent convocation of the spring se-
ries at 11 o'clock this morning in
Hill auditorium. "What Is Man?"
will be the subject of his sermon.
Since coming to this country.
from Scotland in 1906, Professor
Black has held the chair of practi-
cal theology at Union. During the
Great War he became a well-known
figure agitating for American par-
ticipation before the United States
finally threw down the gauntlet to
the Central powers, and since the;
war he has been one of the most1
popular visiting preachers in the l
East. He is in constant demand as;
a chapel speaker at Eastern col-
leges and preparatory schools.
Was Born In Scotland
Born in Rothesay, Scotland, in
1868, Professor Blackatook his M. A.
at Glasgow in 1887. was ordained in
1891, and held Prebyterian pastor-
ates in Paisley and Edinburgh be- I
fore coming to this country. De-{
grees of doctor of divinity have1
been conferred upon him by Yale in;
1908, and Princeton and Glasgow in I
1911.
The University of Pittsburgh
awarded him an honorary degree
of doctor of literature in 1917. He
is the author of several books, the
best-known of which are ''The Open
Door," "The New World', and "Lest.
We Forget."
White Unable To Come'
William Allen White, who was to,
have been the third speaker on the
spring- series of convocations, was
unable to make the trip from Em-1
poria, Kans., where he edits the
Daily Gazette, but indicated in a
letter to Mark Andrews, '29, chair-
man of the convocations commit-
tee, that he might be available if
invited next fall.
Charles R. Brown, retired dean of
the Yale Divinity school, has al-
ready accepted an invitation to .
speak next fall, and Senator Wil-
liam E. Borah has written from
Washington that he will keep aa
similar invitation in mind.
The fiery Idaho solon, who was;
the most effective stump speaker l
in behalf of Herbert Hoover lastI
fall, was too busy campaigning toI
address a convocation then, and,
this spring the special session of
Congress is occupying all of his
attention.

'VICTORS' OFFICIAL SONG OF STATE
Michigan's most popular song, Louis Elbel, '00, the "Wonder Pia-
"The Victors," will become a still nist," a talented musician who had
more popular song from the stand- studied in Germany, was asked to
point of the State of Michigan if a write a song.
resolution in the state house by The night before the show John
Representative Duncan McColl of Philip Sousa's band played the1
Port Huron, proposing that the piece in U-hall; people thought the
song be made the official song of band good and the song fine. The
the state of Michigan, is accepted. night of the show the band played
It now rests with the resolutions it, the minstrel bards sang it, the
committee whether the tune which orchestra played it, the glee club1
Ihas raised thousands to cheers both sang it, everybody sang it, and ev-
in the University stadium and the erybody praised it.
Yost Field house, will raise many Should it become the official
more thousands to rhythmic en- song of the state of Michigan? "I
thusiasm for the Wolverine state. heartily approve of the idea," de-
"The Victors," however, was not ;clared Robert A. Campbell, Treas-
born intentionally to please either] urer of the University who spon-
football or basketball fans; it was !sors both the band and glee club.
1 written as a part of a minstrel I "It is the varsity song without
show, the proceeds of which were question, and the best known piece
to go to the support of an embry- the band and glee club have in
onic band, which like all young their repertoire." He also declared
things, was cherished by everybody it was known over the state as the
but which had a hard time to even Michigan fighting song, often be-
exist. For that 1890 minstrel show ing heard over the radio. On the
tours of the music organizations it
so Nlis invariably played, because if it
isn't played, it is enthusiastically

t
,

HALF MILE RELAY TEAM PLACES
SECOND TO IOWA
QUARTET
TOLAN CAPTURES ThIRD

1 t:
i
k
T
t
t
1
1
v
i

MICHIGAN LEAGUE DANCE TICKETS
WILL BE DISTRIBUTED TOMORROW
Distribution of tickets for the graduate women who were unsuc-
first formal dance to be held in the cessful in obtaining tickets for the
new Michigan League building on formal party at night, and is also
expected to be one of the outstand-
next Saturday night, May 4, will ing social events of this year. No
be carried on tomorrow from a tickets will be distributed for the
table in University Hall. Florence tea dance, and men are expected to
Watchpocket, '29, chairman of the come only by invitation.
In the afternoon, refreshments I
arrangements, has announced that are to be served in the ball-room.
tickets may be obtained betweeen Both of the parties will be going
10 and 12, and 1 and 2 o'clock. on at the same time that the re-
No charge is being made for this ception is being held in the rest
party, which is the foremost under- of the building. All of the rooms
graduate function in connection will be thrown open at this time,
hute fmthand hostesses from all parts of the
with the formal opening of the country will represent those
League. The tickets are being lim- alumnae groups who made the
ited to 250, with the idea of not Michigan League a reality. The
overcrowding the ball-room. three groups who are cooperating
in the formal opening of the build-
Miss Watchpocket stated that ing are the Alumnae Council, the
only representatives from sororities, Board of Directors of the Women's
dormitories, and league houses, or league, and the Board of Governors.
senior women who have already re-
quested reservation will be given
tickets tomorrow. She stated furth-
er that this will be the only timen ElTEAM SCOR[S
given overt t he distribution of
tickets among these particular
groups. The procedure will be to I T
distribute the remaining tickets; I

Wolverines Snatch Second
Relay; Williams Finishes1
2 Behind Ketz

In 440-
Fourth

1111 LIIWI'llI IILI U I
1929 Edition Appears On Campus
Earier Than Any Other In
Recent Years
SALE EXCEEDS RECORD
Active distribution of the 1929
edition of the Michiganensian will
begin at 8 o'clock tomorrow morn-
ing in the basement of Angell hall
and will continue through 5 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon. Students
must present subscription receipt,
in order to secure copies of the
book.
Anpearing on the campus earlier

requested.
Earl V. Moore,
School of Music
such songs as
praised the song,
regarded as the
songs. "It has a

Director of the
and composer of
"Varsity," also
stating that it isI
finest of college
fine melodic line,

and culminates in a brilliant cli-
max."
S.oC Am ANNOUNHCES
AIE F OR TAGDAY
Annual. Appeal For Fresh Air Camp
Funds Scheduled For
May 8

NAVAL

DIS-RMAMENT

PARLEY AT.DEADLOCK
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, April 27.-Patience and
yet iore patience is the tone of,
speculation at Geneva on the re-
duction of naval armaments. The
delegations of all the great naval
powers plainly are preoccupied
with fears that their hopes for les-
sening the burden of naval arma-
ments may be dashed by too much"
speed.
This explains the theory of care-
ful consultations inaugurated by
Hugh S. Gibson, American delegate
with Lord Cushendun of Great
Britain, and M. Saito of Japan, and
continued today with Massigli of
France. On Monday there prob-
ably will be another with Signor Ve
Marinis of Italy.
Their object is to determine the
next concrete step towards naval)
disarmament. The appointment of
the naval sub-committee to meet
after the adjournment of the pre-
paratory disarmament commission
is one possibility, although the
Americans are inclined to doubt its
usefulness.
No meeting of naval experts has
taken place here, so the delegates
are concentrating their efforts on
reaching a political understanding1
concerning the procedure.
The Americans desire to hold a
proposed naval conference simul-

this spring than any 'Ensian in re- AIM AT (GOAL O1 $3,000!
cent years, the 1929 year book
seems one of the most beautiful The annual appeal to the campus
and expensive annuals ever pub- by the Student Christian associa-t
fished on the Michigan campus. tion for University Fresh Air Camp
Thomas Thomas, '29, and J~ Frank- funds has been set for Wednesday,
lin Miller, '29, are the managing May 8, according to Stanton W.
editor and business manager, re- Todd, '30, director of the drive. The
spectively. goal for Tag Day has been set at
Leading Michigan industries are $3,000, and a separate appeal is be-
taken as the theme of the book ing made to house organizations to
and are correlated through the help make up that amount.
means of designs in the corner of Michi gan is one of the few uni-
each page with student activities. versities in the country whose stu-
E. J. Ottoway, president of the dent body supports a camp for un-
University Alumni association, re- derprivileged boys. . During the
ceives the dedication. He was summer months, four hundred boys
picked as a figure from out in the are picked by the welfare organiza-
state who is connected with the tions of Detroit and Ann Arbor and
University, thus carrying out the are given the benefit of a twelves
Michigan theme. day outing away from the city on
Probably the most attractive see- the shores of Lake Patterson. The+
tions in the book are the view sec- camp was begun in 1921.
tion wrought in a phototone pro- hich i
ces tht lndsa tnt f clorto In 1924, the present site, whc is
cess that lends a tint of color to twenty-six miles northwest of Ann
the pictures, and the feature sec- Arbor was bought, and the camp
tion, printed on a buff background' was permanently' established there.
that relieves the monotony of the In the eight years of its existence,
,black and white sections of [he the camp has given a ten or twelve
book. i day vacation to a total of 2,783 poor
ORAoyNOMINATIONS boys, mostly from Detroit. About
SApplications for nominations 1I 400 more will be sent this year, of
to the positions of president, } which the Boys' club of Detroit,
I vice president, secretary, and which is contributing bver $2,000
treasurer of the Oratorical asso- to the fund, will send a hundred.
ciation will be received until C The camp is supported by funds
I Wednesday, May 1, at 1100 Hill jcontributed by the alumni, faculty
I street, it was announced last I and student body.
I nght by Robert J. Gessner, '29, I The camp is managed by a di-
I president of the association. 1 rector, a committee of seven fac-
As it is impossible for candi- I'ulty members and the president of
i dates to run for Oratorical asso- the S. C. A. The director of the
( elation offices by petition, it will :camp his year will be Homer H.
be necessary for them to take capoh, enrl e o e
I this means of applying to the 1 rafton, general secretary of the
j nominating committee, Gessner I C. A,, who has been associated
I stated. with the project since its incep-
oI _- -o(tion.
NINTH ORATORICAL PROGRAM
PRESENTS CORNELIA SKINNER1
As the ninth and concluding meaning of the word. Using no
number on this year's Oratoricalfstage properties, save for - a table
Association lecture course, Cornelia'and chair, or perhaps a shawl, she
Otis Skinner, daughter of the well- presents her little dramas of life
known Otis Skinner, will appear which carry one into the realm of
Tuesday night in Hill auditorium. imagination.
Miss Skinner, considered one of the Leaving the legitimate stage onlyj
foremost entertainers of the pres- about two years ago, sh.e immedi-1
ent day, fortunately was secured by ately took her place as one of the
I officials of the course when Peggy season's outstanding entertainers
I Wood, originally scheduled to ap-|First her name drew attention for
Ipear at that time was forced to it was known that she was thel
cancel her engagement here be- daughter of a brilliant father. Then
cause she is working on a talking her remarkable ability to entertain
movie in Hollywood. I took its rightful position and sue-
MissSkinner's program will con- cess crowded upon her, until thisj

(By Assocce d Press)
DES MOINES, Iowa, April 27-
Michigan athletes scored places in
five events at the finals of the
Drake Relays here today, including
one championship among their
spoils.
The title was that in the hammer
throw, Ketz of the University of
Michigan setting a new Drake rec-
ord with his toss of 157 feet, eight
and two-fifths inches, more than
two feet better than the previous
record of 155 feet six inches, Wil-
liams, another Wolverine perfor-
mer, gained fourth in this event,
tossing the ball out 129 feet, 5j
inches.
Grodsky, Murray, Tarbill and To-
Ian, gave Michigan a second place
in the 880-yard relay, which Iowa
won in 1:28, on a track coated
with mud. The Wolverine runners
stagedma spiritedbattle for second
place with Nebraska, the two teams
pushing the Hawkeyes all the way.
Another second place for the
Wolverine sprinters was recorded in
the 440-yard relay, Illinois taking
the event in :42,2.1
Tolan Has Busy Day
Tolan, dusky Michigan dash art-
ist, who ran as anchor man with
both the quarter and half-inile ag-
gregations, rounded out a busy day'
by placinghthird in the 100-yard
dash, which Bracey, the southern
express of Rice Institute, won in,
:09.8, sensational time for the mud-
dy condition of the track. Tolan'
pushed tder of Nofre Dame all
the way for second place honors,.
but found the going too heavy at
the finish.
Illinois' team of four veterans set
a new record of 10:24 in the dis-
tance medley relay when Orlovich,
White, Stine, and Abbott annexed
first honors. Michigan's quartet
failed to place, as Minnesota, But-
ler and Army took the remaining
three positions behind the Illini.
Hawkeyes Take Relay
Four Hawkeye runners won the
mile relay for Iowa when Steven-;
son, Ferguson, Stamats, and Baird
breasted the tape ahead of a strong
field. Missouri was second, North-
western, third, and Kansas, fourth.
Michigan was shut out of a place
in this race. Iowa's winning time'
was 3:25.4, Potter of Michigan
found the going too fast in the
high hurdles, failing to place.
In spite of the rain, one new
world's record was established i
the 480 yard high hurdle shuttle
relay and new Drake relay marks
were made in the distance medley
relay, pole vault, and hammer
throw. Trimble, Burkhart, Rogers
and Sentman of Illinois set a new
world's mark of 1:02.3 in the shuttle
race. Otterness of Minnesota cap-
tured the pole vault with a new
record of 13 feet four and five-
eighths inches.
ARCHITECTSSTR
PARTY TjICKET SALE
Public sale of the tickets fo. the
Architects' May Party, to be given
the evening of May 10, in Barbour
gymnasium, by the Architectural
society, will be started Monday,
when tickets will be placed on sale
from 12:45 until 4 o'clock in the
afternoon every day at the side
desk of the main lobby of the
Union, it was announced late yes-
terday by the committee in charge.
The price will be $5.50.
The Architect's May Party, for
which Jean Goldkette's Casa Loma
orchestra has been secured, is the
annual social function presented
by the students of the architectural
school.

Farbour gymnasium will be espe-
cially decorated for the occasion.
The motif,. which will be executed

among other senior women whoj
are on the waiting list, and, if any
still remain, to junior women.}
A tea dance to be given on thej
afternoon of May 4 has been plan-
dor fnr t n h va . 1 - -

Wolverines
Open

ric ior the benefit of all under- -
NORThWESTERN IS VICTIM
SAMichigan's Varsity tennis team
{ proved its right to serious titular
consideration by winning over a
strong Northwestern squad in de-
cisive fashion on the Evanston
--- courts. Chalking up its first suc-
Conferences And Group Luncheons I cess of the season in the confer-
Feature Last Meeting Of . once opener yesterday - afternoon
Schoolmasters the Courtwright coached team won
all six/ singles and three doubles
MORE TI"AN 3500 ATTEND matches to score a 9-0 win.
The Wildcat racket wielders, re-
Special conferences and group cently winner over Loyola of Chi-
luncheons were the final events on cago by the same one sided count,
the three day program of the Mich- were mentioned prominently as fa-
igan Schoolmasters' club which vorites in the quest for Conference
closed at noon yesterday. More honors. In losing to the title bound
than 3,500 teachers from all parts Wolverines the Purple netmen were
of the state were present for one able to win only three sets, all of
or more of the sessions which have which came in thet singles compe-
tition.f
Playing in his third year as num-
afternoon. ! ber one man for Michigan in the
Forn t. ,iorc th- filial In - -

C
0
C
S
t
E
t
0

BOX SC
Syracuse
Haymond, 2b
Sibus, cf.......
Stoneberg, lf......
Horowitz, ss......
Stevens, lb.....
Deming, c.
Titmes, rf......
Topol, 3b.......
Basley, p. ........

CORE
AB R
5 1
5 1
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 0
4 2
4 1

H.
3
1.
0
0
2

PY
3
1
2
9
3
5
3

A
5
0
1
3
0
0
0p
2

E
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

G0VRNS olAME TO SYRACUSE
IN NINTH INNING
HAYMOND'S HOME RUN GIVES
ORANGE 5 TO 3 VICTORY
OVER MICHIGAN
CORRIDEN HITS HOME RUN
Kubicek Makes Three Hits To Lead
Wolverine Attack; McAfee
Strikes Out Eleven
(B~y Associated Press)
SYRACUSE, April s27.-Hay-
mond's home run in the ninth in-
ning with one man on base gave
Syracuse a 5-3 victory over Michi-
gan here today. McAfee, pitching
for Michigan, allowed 11, hits, while
Balsley, who occupied the mound
for 'the Orange, restricted the Wol-
verines to a like number. Three
Michigan errors were instrumental
in the Syracuse triumph.
The score was tied at three apiece
going into the last of the ninth,
when the Orange shoved two runs
across the plate as the result of
Haymond's home run. Only one
man was out and one on base when
the Syracuse second baseman
landed on one of McAfee's pitches
for the circuit.
McAfee fanned 11 of the oppos-
ing batsmen, but his two errors did
not aid the Michigan cause. Louis
Kubicek led the Wolverines at bat
with three singles, while Haymond,
leading off for Syracuse, also col-
lected three hits, including his
timely home run. Captain Corri-
den of Michigan also hit for the
circuit in the sixth inning.

Totals. ... 38

5

11 27 11 2

Michigan
Neblung, cf....
Corriden, If.
Straub, rf. ........
Kubicek, 2b. ......

r mcio , a ntoEg nc 1enai ses~-
sions was the conference at 9:30
o'clock yesterday morning in Pat-'
tengill auditorium of Ann Arbor
high school, of character training
in junior and senior high schools,
at which E. H. Fishback, author of
"Character Training in Senior and
Junior High Schools," was the prin-
cipal speaker.
Mr. Fishback took as the topic'

singles, Captain Barton proved a

AB
5
5
5
5
4
4
3
4
4

R
0
1
1
1
0
0
0(
0
0

HI
I
1
2
3
1
0
1
1
1

PO
0
0
2
1
1
6
1
12
2

A
0
0
0
1
2
3
1
0
1

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2

winner over Riel of Northwestern Weintraub, 3b.,...
in the hardest -fought and most McCoy, 1b. .....
spectacular match of the day. Riel I Myron, ssk.......
Purple basketball star, dropped the Truskowski, c. ....
IMcAfee, p. .....
first set to the Wolverine leader by
a 6-1 score, came back to gain the !Totals,....:...:

39 3 11 25 8 3

decision in the second set 7-9 only
to drop the final to Barton 6-4.
Ed Hammer, in his first varsity

for his address, "Character Educa- appearance for Michigan upset
tion as a Function of the Public Perrin in the second three set;
School System." Following his talk.match of the day by a 6-0, 6-8, 6-2
a number of round table discussions score. Jim Spencer, playing in theI
on various phases of the subject third position for Michigan, proved
took place. winneror n of
Conferences on individual sub- No easy ter over Rny6-3
jects included in the curricula o Northwestern, 6-1, 6-3.
Michigan high schools formed the Registering the most impressive
major part of the program. These win of the day Bob Beal took Cur-
sessions, of which there were more tis of Northwestern into camp by
than 30, included lectures by well a 6-2, 6-0. In the fifth singles
known authorities on the subjects match Bacon outstroked Martin of
considered and informal discussion the Purple to chalk up a decisive
sections led by members of the 6-0, 6-3 win. Bergheim of Ndr th-
University faculty. western fell victim to Schaeffer in
. Beside the special conferences on the sixth singles, 6-2, 6-8, 6-3.
school subjects, several general ses- In. the first doubles Barton anci
sions were held, including the an- Hammer won over Riela and Perrin,
nual banquet and the annual con-l
vocation, at which speakers of note c6-4, 6-3. Spencer and Beal gained
occupied the program for the most 1 the second doubles over Rooney
part. Two business meetings of the land Martin 6-3, 6-4, while the vet-
schoolmasters' club were also held eran combination Moore and
during the meeting time in Ann Schaeffer defeated Weld and Nel-'
Arbor. ;son 6-1, 7-5.
OAKLAND HILLS GOLF SQUAD
DEFEATS VARSITY IN UPSET

Score by innings:
Michigan... ......000 201 000-3
Syracuse..........002 000 102-5
Two base hits-Stevens, Myron,
McAfee. Three base hit-Topol.
Home runs-Haymond, Corriden.
Left on bases-Syracuse, 6; Michi-
gan, 10. Struck out-By McAfee,
11; Balsley, 1. Stolen bases-Hay-
rnond, Straub, Kubicek, Myron.
FRE,[NCH PLAY TICKETS
CO ON1SALE MONDAY
Sale of tickets for the twenty-
second annual French play, "Mi-
'quette et sa Mere," to be presented
at 8:15 Thursday evening, May 2,
in Mimes theater by members of
Ithe Cercle Francais, will begin at 1
'o'clock Monday afternoon in
Graham's State street book store,
it was annmunced yesterday by

WIuFEIVV I wEV~va1

Win All Matches
Conference Tennis
Season

To

Prof. Rene Talamon, of the
mance languages department
faculty sponsor of the club.

Ro-
and

7

Playing over a wet and soggy
course and fighting a high
wind all the way around; the Wol-
verine golfers were the victims of
a severe upset in their match with
the Oakland Hills Country Club
team yesterday afternoon, losing
unexpectedly by a score of 21 1-2-
14 1-2.
The meeting with the Detroit
club squad was the season opener
for the Varsity, and although the
Oakland Hills team is considered
one of the strongest in the Detroit
district, the one-sided defeat of the
Wolverines came as a distinct sur-
prise. Both singles and foresome
matches were nlaverL with eaeh.

ing an 81. The Berglin, Ward-
Ryan, Dow foresome resulted in 2
points for the Detroit men and one
for the collegians.-
Art Ahlstrom lost 2 1-2 points tol
Griffin, taking an 83 to go around1
the tricky layout, while his partner{
Livingston won 2 1-2 from Denk,
shooting an 82. The foresome
match gave the Varsity 2 points
and the Oakland Hills men one.
Lewis lost 2 1-2 points to Mc
Fawn, having to take 86 strokes to
negotiate the round, and Hoover
also lost 2 1-2, his opponent being
Richardson. The Michigan men
lost all three points in the fore-
some match.
TrhQ last ma to veot uncdpr war

No tickets will be sold at the
East university street store of the
same company, it was announced
The cast, with Mary Karpinski,
Grad., and Margart Effinger in the
title roles,, is now rehearsing daily,
it is reported. All scenery, stage
properties and lighting effects are
being executed by the expert staff
of technicians,
r OUr'eatherm~
3

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