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February 16, 1929 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-02-16

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1PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.. _ _ _.

rublished every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications,
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
etedited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, .s second class matter. Special rate
of postag' granted by Third Assistant Post-
master (General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editor:al, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor.......................Nelson J.Smith
City Editor..... . ........ J. Stewart Hooker
News Editor.......R.....ichard C. Kurvink
Sports Editor.. ... .W. Morris Quinn
Women's Editor .. .........Sylvia S. Stone
Telegraph Editor.............George Stauter
Music and Drama....... .'...... R. L. Askren
Assistant City Editor........... Robert Silbar

left Hepburn with a silly grin on
his face. I
More recently the well-organized)
Anti-Saloon League lobby inWash-
ington failed signally to wheedle
from the House an extra twenty-
four million dollars the Senate,
voted for "one honest effort to en-
force prohibition."
A big Anti-Saloon League rally
now under way in Florida tried to I
interest Herbert Hoovei in pro-
nouncing some pro-league senti-
ments, but the President-elect
tacitly repudiated the organization1
by refusing with the statement that ,
he had already concocted his own
nation-wide scheme of enforce-
ment.
Wayne B. Wheeler during his
life made dry speeches and was
the butt of more wisecracks, if pos-
sible, than Hooverizer Mabel Wille-
brandt, W. C. T. U. extraordinary
with Anti-Saloon League affilia-
tions. Other less able persons have
tried to follow his footsteps, but as'
their charges have grown more
reckless and their victories fewer,
the league has sunk deeper into
that- limbo of discarded crusades
from which few crusaders score
comebacks.

ToastedRos -
Just before going to press a couple of days ago, R. Leslie Askren
announced that there would be no Music and Drama column today; so
here's a double dose of Rolls. Take your choice. Those who read both
will be hereinafter known as Faithful Readers.

Strings . . Supplies
.. epairs .
for all Musical Instruments
BIOGRAPHY -FICTION - POETRY
MUSIC HOUSE
110 S. Main St. A -_

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Night: Editors
Joseph E. Howell Charles S. Monroe
Donald J. Kline Pierce Rosenberg
Lawrence R. Klein George E. Simons
George C. Tilley
Reporters
Paul L. Adamns Donald E. Layman
Morris Alexande : Charles A. Lewis
C. A. Askren Marian McDonald
Bertram Askwi"i Ilenry Merry
Louise Behynme Elizabeth Quaife
Arthur Bernsteu Victor Rabinowitz
Seton C. Bovee . Joseph A. Russell
Isabel Charles Anne Schell
1'. R. Chubb Rachel Shearer
Frank I. Cooper Howard Simon
Helen Domnine Robert L. Sloss
Margaret Eckels Ruth Steadman
Douglas Edwards A. Stewart
Valborg Egeland Cadwell Swanson
Robert J. Feldman Jane Thayer
Marjorie Follmer Edith Thomas
William Gentry Beth Valentine
Ruth Geddes Gurney Williams
David B. Hempstead Jr. Walter Wilds
Richard Jung George E. Wohlgemuth
Charles R. Kaufman Edward L. Warner Jr.
Ruth Kelsey Cleland Wyllie
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager--RAYMOND WACHTER

Editorial Comment

-/

Department Managers Scherer
Advertising...............aA. James Jordan
Advertising......... ........arl AV. Hammer
Service..................Herbert E. Varnum
Circulation......... ... . eorgeES. Bradley
Accounts..............Larence -E. alkley
Publications..............aay M. Hofelich
s' - Assistants
Mary Chase Marion Kerr
Jeanette Dale Lillian Kovinsky
ernor Davis Bernard Larson
Bessie Egeland Hollister Maley
Sally Faster 1. A. Newman
Anna Goldberg Jack Rose
Kasper Halverson Carl F. Schen
George Hamilton George Sater
ack Horwic Sherwood Upton
Lx Humphrey Marie ellstead-
Night Editor-GEORGE E. SIMONS
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1929
THE ROMAN SETTLEMENT
Historically and politically of
much more than passing signifi-
cance, the treaties designed to
bring to a close the now more than
half a century old Roman question
seems likely to raise a number of
questions of considerable impor-
tance from the standpoint of In-
ternational Law.
From the terms of the agree-
ment as announced, it appears that
the pope is recognized by Italy as
an independent temporal sovereign.
If the pope is so recognized by
the powers generally, the possibil-
ity of the Vatican state being ac-
cepted as a member of the League
of Nations must be considered. And
if the pope is to be received as a
member of the League, it may be
asked with equal candor, "Will he
be eligible for election to the coun-
cil of the League?"
The vast majority of the agree-
ment appears to be advantageous
to both the Holy See and the
Italian government. The Vatican
gains a moral victory in its rein-
statement as a temporal power,
however small, and the state re-
ceives the added benefit which
must accompany the moral backing
and support of the church.
From the standpoint of world
politics, it seems quite likely that
Premier Mussolini is the chief
gainer as the concessions which he
has made to the Vatican . are
of a nature which retract but little
from his power while the move
serves in many ways to extend and
strengthen his influence.
ON THE DOWN-GRADE
Among the quaint and odorous
relics of our country's history are
such institutions as the "Tweed
Ring" and the "Carpetbaggers."
The Ku KluJ Klan, despite the
vociferations of Tom Heflin, is
rapidly declining into the same
category, and if straws show which
way the wind is blowing, the Anti-
Saloon League will be there erel
long.
The history of each of these
movements is one of rise, hey-day,
and decline. It is not too much
to hope that the Anti-Saloon
League reached its hey-day with
the passage of the eighteenth
amendment, and is now safely in

THE LEGION AND POLITICSl
(From the Ann Arbor Daily News)I
"The charge that the Americans
Legion is a 'vital cog in the Re-c
publican machine in Michigan' is
as untrue as it is absurd," Reuel I.
Blake, commander of the secondr
congressional district of the organ-t
ization, said today commenting on(
an editorial that appeared in one I
of the, University publications rela-i
tive to the appointment of Paul V.
McNutt, dean of the Indiana law
school, to succeed President Little.
Mr. Blake further stated that the
American Legion has never been
actively interested in the political
activities of any party.
"Gov. Green made the statement
concerning Mr. McNutt voluntarily
and the resultant tempest in a tea-
pot is the product of journalistic
ingenuity rather than genuine con-
cern on the part of the individual'
who charges that the Legion is in
politics. I have met and talked,
with Mr. McNutt and am just as
ignorant of his political affiliations
today as I ever was and I pre-:
sume that that is true of every
member of the state executive
board of the Legion."
That the policy of the Legion is
to avoid the possibility of politics
interfering in any way with the
welfare of the organization either
local, state or national is indicated
by the fact that a member of the
Legion who is active in politics to I
the extent that he holds any re-
munerative political office is notj
permitted to function as an of-j
ficer in the organization and his1
resignation as such becomes auto-
matically effective with the an-
nouncement that he seeks political
preferment.
"I know nothing of Commander
McNutt's educational qualifications
but I heartily believe that he is a
splendid type of American citizen
and a great leader, which perhaps
is more than may be honestly said
of the recent critic who questioned
his ability and who will be in-
strumental in the selection of the,1
next president of the University,"
Mr. Blake concluded.

HOW HIGH IS A WAVE?
Some poor fish called up The
Daily office yesterday afternoon
and asked if we had any informa-
tion about how high an ocean
wave could rise. While we think
this is about the acme of foolish
questions, we believe in the good
old doctrine of "The customer is
always right." Consequently, Rolls
is offering an open forum to all
readers who will send in an at-
tempted answer to this query: How
high can an ocean wave rise?
* * *
We could, of course, offer a
prize for, the correct answer,
and perhaps we shall. Then,
here's toy the contest, long may
it wave!.
* * *
The Union bridge tournament
will soon be under way. It is an-
nounced in connection with it that
the prize for the team that wins
second place will receive season
passes to all Mimes performances.
After seeing The Marquise, this
should double the efforts of every
one to win.
Lowell Thomas, former Alaskan
musher,,is slated to speak here, so
the latest propaganda from the
Oratorical association relates. Well,
he should be used to our weather
if he has traveled, much in Alaska,
Gumley thinks he is running
ahead of us in this column
writing race, so we'll just horse
him by running a cut. Below is
a facsimile of a cart's with-
drawal from a little girl. It's a
withdrawal slip because the
cart skidded.
WITHDRAWAL OF CART
-SIGNED BY TEACHER
OF GRAMMAR SCHOOL

WIVO CARES ABOUT A WAVE?
Some poor fish cailed up The
Daily office yesterday---oh, pardon',
us; this business of ordering
Toasted Rolls on two is confusing.
Lark is sitting beside us, trying to:
fill up the column due west of here
and we looked over just in time to
see that he has beaten us to this
First c~r(.k

t
I
f
i
i'
i

i -

ill

But that doesn't prevent us
from submitting an answer,
which is this: Waves come as
high as fifteen dollars, and if
you don't believe us you can
barge over to the Women's I
desk and ask them like we did.
This is going to be a close race.
The thumping of Lark's machine
worries us but there are tricks tol
every trade and we'll get a couple
inches ahead of him by having the
Rolls' artist dash off an illustra-
tion. While he's doing that we'll
think up a crack for it.
-° x hI'
\ '~~~

4
New York Listed
Stocks
Private wires to all
Markets

Conservative margin accounts
solicited
Telephone 22541
Brown-Cress & Co.,
Inc,
Investment Securities
7th Floor First Nat'l
Bank Bldg.
P. B. HARDING

11

Dealer in

ANTIQUES
Upholstering, Furniture
Repairing, Refinishing
and Remodeling
218 East Huron Street
Ann Arbor - - - - Michigan
Phone 3432

I

He couldn't think of anythingI
to draw so he made a composite
portrait of Lark and us, which
means you can think up your
Own wisecrack.
IFrom now on we're having. no
conferences with Lark. He can
figure out his own column. A
headline in a New York paper says,
UNCONSCIOUS 140 HOURS, GIRL
BETTER.
Better what? Better come
here to school, we suppose,
where she'd be among friends.
She'd get along great at the
Umpty Umpty Ump house.
TOY CAR STUCK IN BOY'S
THROAT, says another headline.

4A

:m;

'I
A

F

Ncl Read The Classified Ads p

*1

11

A New ~YoVrr n~iennner

I
i
i

Maybe he had some
on his tonsils. The
probably start again
body yells, "Pulova
whatinell!"

red spots
car will
if some-
de coil),

(The

Times, if you must know) gives us'
the startling information of the
fact that a girl, unconscious for 140
hours, is slowly recovering. Well,j
these week-ends at a Hop will wearj
a person down.
* * '1

1

And then we see where an ice
man is named in a divorce, suit.
Gosh, we thought that there were
some jokes that were impossible
exaggerations, but it seems not.
(We'd say something about Frigid-
aires but if Lark saw that item we
know darn well he'll pull that Ice
Smachine g".)

Pastor Goes To Church
Ionia, a headline tells
Probably a new experience
him

At
us.
for

SUCH SOOTHING, STEADY HEAT
WITH AN ELECTRIC HEATING PAD!

-1-
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than 3o0
words it possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re.
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
MICHIGAN STOOPS TO CONQUER
To the Editor:
The rumor that "Silent Cal" is
being considered for the presidency
of our beloved Alma Mater is in-
deed alive with the greatest pos-
sibilities; Consider if you will his
unique qualifications:
(1) The "Sphinx" of the White
House is a recognized politician of
no mean rapport. He takes advice
well. What a relief to the weary
Board of Regents. (Governor Green
please note).
(2) Upon retiring "Cal" is plan-
ning just to "whittle" for a time.
As president of the University he
would have ample time to indulge
in this pastime. (B. & G. Boys
kindly note).
(3) Of course nobody is clear
in respect to the President's stand
on prohibition question. What a
joy to the fraternities! (Federall
Agents make your plans).
(4) Then, too, "Cal" is a firm
believer in the established order
of, things. He believes that nature

Ji

Believe it or not, a boy is re- "Sun lamps" are to be used to
ported to have a toy automobile tan the cheeks of the members of
lodged tight in his throat, en- I Congress. At the rate they've been
dangering his life. We have been going, tile miserable fakirs, it's
trying to figure-out how it got there,,not their cheeks that ned tan ning.
and our only result is the decision ilc * *
that it was a college boy trying to The Coolidges, according to the
swallow the automobile ban, papers, arrived at the White House
with eight trunks, and are leaving
with 150 boxes and barrels.
From Detroit comes the , 4
scandal that an ice .man is We do't want to be xyp&-
naamed in a divorce suit. Prob- ! criticd, but has all the silver
ably some Frigidaire propa- been carefully counted?
ganda. * * *
A little lird has juist whisnered
rflle Colidge

b

I

The Coolidges t
preparations to
House to make

(Rep.) are
leave the
e room f

making
White
for the

to us (and it wasn't Lark, pith
tha ifIhe Turks ar e banning fore
wives.
They eln'il Mkt;a<t Utris
J miixturC, vo dotibt; Personally

eg)
ignI

Hoovers (Rep.), it is rumored. TheI
papers inform us that when the
Coolidges came they, had but eight
trunks, but that they are leaving
with 150 boxes and barrels. It must
be some of that prosperity (Rep,).
.The Turks have passed a law
forbidding foreign wives. Well,t
that's a ban that really
amounts to something.
*4 * *
There is a diplomat In France
who arises every tiorning early
and takes an ice bath, even in the
coldest weather. Oh, so that's how

yI-
,Y,

I'd rather have Virginia.
.18O111C gen lemel prefer blend!i
!Durig "Farmer's Week" at ,Ohio
State, old-time dances were held
in the university gymnasium every
night and, according to the dis-
pat(11, "attracted many students."
I 4 lh. I!( 4hi the
what it was we'll bet they went
I right out again. (Cynical, eh?)
I .,.

these foreign relations are cooled. Well, we've been dawdling along
* * here for most of the afternoon and
All buses and taxicabs in haven't so much as miadcle a face
Philadelphia are going to burn |at R. Leslie Askren, Esq., who gave
oil instead of gasoline. That's [us the whole column to mess
nothing, the taxicab drivers in around in. Well, and so we're going
Ann Arbor have been well-oiled Ito say something about "The
for years. Marquise" which will stalk across
'* ithe boards-gee, we like that: stalk
His Royal Majesty, V. Leslie I across the boards--this afternoon

I -'-I I

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