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April 17, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-04-17

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APRIL 17, 1929

9

TT-fl~ M fc~Pr'+~\t ~W~t rv~

I-A.a-A. A N l * . A.

CLUM".l%&m

__.'_ '

DEVOTE VACATION TO
Building And Grounds Staff Works
On Conditioning Of Campus
Lawns and Shrubberies
STUDENT CREW ASSISTS!
Thorough spring cleaning of the
campus and its buildings still.
claimed the entire attention of E.
C. Pardon and his staff of Buildings'
and Grounds operatives, with the
addition of an auxiliary crew of
students, remaining in Ann Arbor
dring Easter vacation, yesterday.
Foremost among the tasks of
the departnent was cleaning away
the debris of the winter, raking the
campus lawns, and where lawns
had been killed by lack' of sunshine
or othercauses, steps were taken to
plant new grass plots.
Around Alumni Memorial hall,
where trees had shaded and killed
grass, old earth was dug up to the
depth' of a foot or more, and new
soil spread. Trees were trimmed to
allow as much sunshine as possible
to penetrate. Other barren spots
on the campus were treated in a
similar manner.
Some 200 pounds or more of grass
seed has already been spread on
the campus, with more to follow.
Fertilizer has been purchased in
huge quantities, and a large amount
scattered. One lot of ten tons and
another of five tons were delivered
for use on the campus this spring.
Beginning this week, Pardon and.
his aides will concentrate en land-
scaping the Women's League build-
ing, which is scheduled for formal.
opening May 4. Beds are being
prepared, and blank earth being
drawn to the grounds for filling.
Shrubs have been ordered, and
should be received within a few'
days, for immediate setting. A gen-
eral clean-up of. the grounds is
being carried on now.
All during last week the window-
washing squads were at work on
the panes of campus buildings,
particularly the museum, new
medical building, and engineering
shops, the crew cleaning several
thousand windows during the week.l
Weather prohibited a large quan-
tity of painting which Mr. Pardon
hoped to have done before the re-
opening of classes.
PORTABLE'
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Remington, Royals.
Corona. Underwood
Colored duco finishes. Price $60.
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade Phone 6615

I I

Washington Alumni1
To Dine Cabinet Men

.I

W. C. NAYOR, PRO
IS VICTIM IN AIl

Formal recognition of their ac-I
jcomplishments in securing ap-j
pointment to 'the cabinet of Presi-
dent Hoover 'will be accorded James
A. Good. Rob rt P. Lamont, and
Arthur M. Hyde, secretaries of. war,
commerce and agriculture respec-
tively, at a sp(cial banquet in the
National Capitiol on Friday, April
26, according to communicationsI
received here yesterday.
The entire affair has been ar-
ranged by the University of Michi-
gan club of Washington, the hosts
of the evening, and President E. J.1
Ottaway of the.Alumni association
is expected to attend as one of the
principal speakers.

William Charles . Nayor, '12E,
president of the Detroit Flying
club,, died at 3:30 yesterdaymorn-
ing at Ford:Hospital in Detroit,as a
result, of injuries sustained in -an
airplane collision at Ford Airport
on Saturday afternoon, when two
'others, A. H.'Kreider and Capt. E.
T. Bruce, were killed almost in-
stantly.
Born March 5, 1900, he received
a degree of bachelor of science in
aeronautical engineering from the-
University in 1922. He was prom-
inent both as an aeronautical engi
neer and as a balloonist. He par--
ticipated in several national and

MINENT ALUMNUS, Architect School Has
RPLANE ACCIDENT Water Color Display
Tempera water colors by Andre
international races and won, Leconte are being exhibited in the:
among'others, The Dtroit News cases in the ground floor corridor
trophy. (of the Architectural building this:
Nayor was for some time a de- week. The works of the French
signer with the Aircraft -Develop- artist were done while he was in
ment corporation, Detroit. Later IGreece last summer.
he was chief engineer for the Stin- Leconte is a resident student at
son aircraft corporation, North- the French academy in Rome and
ville. He designed the Stinson mon*- architect for the French govern-
iplane which was flown by 'Schlee ment. He has just obtained per-
and Brock from Detroit across the mission from the Vatican to draw
Atlantic, Europe, Asia, and Japan,ithe Majolica floors of the Borgia
and back to Detroit. apartments.
FRATERNITIES-SORORITIES
GIVE US A TRIAL ON ALL
YOUR PRINTING NEEDS
Printing That Pleases
7o'ier . r Uetter rpressions
305 Maynard St. Phone 8805
i1 111#H11l11#11111!# #1##ltSt11##1##11##111111##111111#1111#111111#U##1111##11111## IU###111##a

h U

Like the diff e rence .between~
a iflTe .ard a -sl*ngashot
in the physics lab. they call it a higher coeficient of
elasticity . . On the tennis court they say that steel is
faster than gut.
Drive a ball' with-a Dayton SteellIRaequet, and on anl
average it will get there a full step .quicker. Its extra
springiness gives you the jump on speedier players.
Tennis players everywhere are changing to the Dayton
Steel Racquet because it's made for the modern game--a
faster, harder game than the class of '20 ever dreamed of.
Perfect balance--more speed --accuraey of a rifle.
They're in the Dayton Steel Racquet.
You're the player-arid you're the judge. But don't
let another day go by without taking a look at the world's
fastest tennis racquet. Dayton Steel Racquet Co.,
Dayton, Ohio.
DAYTON STE RACQU ET

"FILTERET TFS"
STOlPRADIO NOISES
WHEN APPLIED TO
Oil Burners. Electric Refrigerators, Electric Sign Flashers, Fads
Washing Machines, Cash Registers, etc.
LET US EXPLAIN THEM -
Smpsonradio Serbie
DIAL 21 - 408

-
ON SAME ROGRAM
CLARK & McCULLOUGH in "THE HONOR SYSTEM"
FOX MOVIETONE NEWS Speaks For Itself,

521 East Liberty

St.

f'

I

IF IT'S DONE WITH HEAT, YOU CAN DO IT BETTER WITH GAS
BILLIONS OF CUBIC FEET
1917
10
12511
199
100
75
20
Sates of mnanufactured gsi h ntdSae or industrieat and comnmercital purposes front 1921 to 1928, inclu~siv~e.
Note that the aceFalt votum~e has in-creased more than'100%. JWherever heat is needed, gas heat is, better.
Each year Industrial Gas Heat
gais in popularity

P. G. ROBERTS.
PrbO aion Engier,
Penn State, '25

x

C. W. GU'Tf,
Mecl, aical Einruier..
Colorado School of
Mines. "2
ROB. R EYNOI;Ds,
Turbine Ent neering,
Pratt !Iwtltuztc,'

YOUNGER COLLEGE MEN
ON RECENT WESTINGHOUSE JOBS

The Duke Pow er Company Turbine-Generators

BACK in 1921, seventy-odd bil-
lions of cubic feet of manufac-
tured gas met Industry's needs.
Those were the days when Industry
was just learning "if it's done with
heat, you can do it better with qas."
Last year Industry used a hundred
and forty-seven billion cubic feet.
Something more than double 1921's
record!
This gain wasn't philanthropy. In-
dustry is hard boiled. Gas heat
produces!
Today there are innumerable uses for
gas heat in industry. From bread-bak-

ing to heat-treating steel; from glass--
blowing to pottery firing. And new
uses are being developed every day.
Gas heat is economical; profitable.
It is flexible; capable of accurate
control and accurate regulation.
Above all, it is dependable, not sub-
ject to break-down or interruptions.
Whatever the heating roblem,
gas heat gives the most for every
fuel dollar.
There is a book, "Industrial-Gas
Heat," which tells about gas in In
dustry. 'You will- find it interesting
and instructive. A postal card brings
it. Address

!h'Vere do yotag college men get in a
large industrial organization? Have
they opportunity to exercise creative
talent? Is individual work recognzized?
p HE largest steam-turbine
gencrator units to be installed
south of the Mason-Dixon line
are now being built for one of
the most unusual organizations
of its kind in the world. The
Dukc Power Company is faious
for the eliciency of its power
plants--and for the fact that its

At a horseshoe bend ini the ,Ca, kilowatts.
tawba River in tb- heanrit of th e e 150,000 hot
Piedmont Carolinas the Duk By operat
P ower Company is btldog a capacity dui
generating p ant wb h, 1If present bout-6 of the
plans are carried out, wi l he the panty'shydro.
kiridevariations ii
largest of its kmd the south-
eastern United States. The ulti- power requi
will furnish
mate capacity will probably be
current cos
6oo,000 horscpower. The first
two Units, wh ich Wcstin ghouse is The large job;
titons. Westin;
now building, each are to have a tips. ysi
appeal for yoi
generating ecaciof S5,C000 and genius b

0

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