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March 29, 1929 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-03-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRUDAY MARUI'

;f 192~

Published every morning except Monday
duing the University year by the Board in
Control of Studnt Publications.

Mvember of Western Conference EditorialV
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-G
titled tothe use for republication of allnews
dispatches "credited to it or not otherwiset
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lishied herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ana Arbor,1
Michigan, assecond class matter. Special rate
of postagnegranted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4"So-
offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-;
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
Editor.............Nelson J. Smith
CityEditor.............. Stewart Hooker
News Editor............Richard C.rKurvink
Sports Editor .........W. Morris Quinn
Women's Editor......S.....ylvia S. Stone
Telegraph Editor .....eorg... Stautei
muuie and Vrama...............R. L,. Askren
.ssistant City Editor...........Robert Silbar

tion. He went on to say that peo-!
ple who desired the repeal of the
gag law were suffering from hal-
lucinations. Perhaps Mr. Peterson
would say that the framers of the
Constitution of the United States
were also suffering from hallucina-
tions.
This champion of reformers';
rights, along with his 85 cohorts, A
have defied the Constitution and
the principles on which this na-
tion were founded, and they have
joined with reform forces which,
if given lee way, will not stop until,
every semblance of personal free-
dom is taken from Americans. Not
only does such a bill regulate min-
utely the actions of a certain
group of men, but its ultimate aim
is to control the pubic opinion of
the people.
Censorship of the press recalls
tyranny which was supposed to
have been abolished with the, com-
ing of the republic democracy, or
constitutional monarchy. It re-
calls a policy which has been re-
j ected by enlightened men for 300
years as being politically and
morally unsound. It deprives the
i people of the state of their right
to know what actually happens and
intimates that they are not intel-
ligent enough to weigh facts and
opinions as to their actual worth.
As such, the law should be strenu-
ously opposed by all intelligent
citizens of the country.

Night
J~seph E. Howell
Donald J. Kline
Lawrence R. Klein
George

Editors
Charles S. Monroe
Pierce Rosenberg
George E. Simons
C. Tilley

Reporters
Paul L. Adams Donald E. Layman
Morris Alexandra Charles A. Lewis
C.r A. Askren arian McDonald
Bertram Askwif'2 Henry Merry
Louise Behyme-- Elizabeth Quaife
Arthur Lernste u Victor Rabinowitz
Reton C. Bove Joeph A. Russell
Isabel Charles RAnnchellR hb
V. R. Chubb Rachel Shearer
Frank R. Cooper Howard Simon
Helen Domine Robert L. Slos
Margaret Eckels Ruth Steadman
Douglas Edwards A. Stewart
Valborg Egeland Cadwell Swansea
Vjer j.-reiamian Jane Thayer
Marjorie Follmer Edith Thomas
William Gentry Beth valentine
Ruth Geddes Gurney Williams
David B. Hempstead Jr. Welter Wilds t
Richard Jung George E. Wohlgemuth
Charles R. Kaufman Edward L. Warner Jr.
Ruth Kelsey Cleland Wylbe

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 212141
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAYMOND WACHTER
Department Managers
Advertising................Alex K. Scherer
Advertising........-.......A. James Jordan
Advertising.............. Carl W. Hamner
Service.............Herbert E. Varnum
C2irculation.... ........... George S. Bradley
Accounts.............Lawrence E. Walkley
PUblications.............Ray M. Hofelich
Assistants
Mary Chase .,14aiun Kerr
Jeanette Dale Lillian Kovinsky
Vernor Davis Bernard Larson
Bessie Egeland iollister Mabley
Sally Faster 1. A. Newman
Anna Goldberg Jack Rose
Kasper Halversox Carl F. Schemmi
George Hamilton George Spatert.
jack Horwich Sherwood Upton
1ixiumphrey Marie Wellstead
FRIDAY, MARCH 29, 1929
Night Editor-DONALD J. KLINE
ACTION VS. RESQLUTION
We haye already spent some
time in these columns discussing
the action of the student council
in taking steps to enforce the
traditional wearing of pots by
the freshmen. The announcement
yesterday that . offenders will be
dealt with in the near future and
that first year men resisting the
summons to appear before the
council will be handled by Var-
sity letter men employing strong-
arm methods puts further proof of
sincerity and determination in the
action of the council.
But we must still be the least bit
sceptical. Time and time again,
the various governing and admin-
istrative bodies of the University
have set forth resolutions and more
resolutions with an apparently
strong determination, but when
the time came for action, there
was nothing but idle talk.
The actions of the student coun-
cil certainly have the "ear-marks"
of genuinely sincere plans and we
are not trying to depracate the
council, but it remains to be seen
whether the latest plan will be
forgotten within a few weeks or
whether real action :kil take place.
It is to be earnestly sought, of
course, that the latter be the case E
and that the fine tradition ofk
freshman pots be kept from obli-
vion by means of well-organized
methods. To .the student council
we say, "Go to it, boys."
MINNESOTA TIGHTENS THE
CLAMPS
Adding insult to injury has been
the latest accomplishment of the
legislature of Minnesota. The house
of representatives confirmed by a
vote of 86-30 the narrow and ridi-
culous policy of the committee in
voting down the measure intro-
duced to repeal the press gag law
on the statute books of the north-
ern state. Of 11,6 state representa- I

FORESTS AND FLOODS
The advent of spring again
brings up the menace of floods, the
most recent being the one in Flori-
da. Moreover it again raises the
question of flood prevention. The
recommendation of the Federal
Forest service seem the most prac-
tical in more ways than one.
Essentially what the forest serv-
ice desires is an extensive foresta-
tion of those waste areas compris-
ing the headwaters of the large
and dangerous rivers. Such estab-
lishment of forests would give body
to the soil so that the water might
be absorbed more readily besides
being conducive to forest growth.
More soil and silt would be retained
instead of being allowed to con-
tribute to the destruction of the
torrents of water at the mouth.
This program is considered as be-
ing capable of great effectiveness
particularly in the Bad Lands of
the Dakotas, where the land is
barren and impassable due to
constant erosion.
But not only would control of
floods be effected, but other bene-
fits would also accrue indirectly.
Such economic benefits of great
significance are the creation of
better timber supply, better soil
conservation, improved agricultural
conditions, betterment of the live-
stock industry and protection of
publicity owned grazing lands, pre-
vention of stream pollution, and
increasing opportunities for out-
door recreation and the protection
of game and fish.
The foresters' plan's greatest vir-
tue is that it gets at the source of
the problem, where its existence as
a problem is small; while the engi-
neers want to deal with the prob-
lem where it has grown to mon-
strous size. Trouble is not so easy
to deal with when all piled up, but
definite steps should be taken at
once in a positive direction. ,
__- _--_-- -
Cal Coolidge seems to have liked
the Red Grange tactics, and him-
self is trying to take advantage of
his name while it holds the pub-
lic-witness his numerous articles
in popular magazines.

o LL
OASTD ROLL
;
..NEXT TO THE I
LAST HOBBY,
HONEST
EDITOR'S NOTE: With this is-
sue Rolls presents the eleventh of a
series of Interviews on the hobbies
of the prominent students on the
University campus. These inter-
views will appear daily, and will
they throw interesting sidelights
on the intimate lives of prominent
campus political puppets? Oh, my!
Barry Balkley, Sheik Of Sheiks
(Heh, Heh), Thinks He Can
Get By On His Looks
Mr. Balkey turned away
from his mirror long enough to
answer a Rolls reporter. "Yes,"<
he sighed, "I spend my time ve
trying to make people believe
I am the best looking boy on
the campus, or anywhere, but
no one seems to beieve me.
"Imagine my embarrassment
when I discovered that the bal-.
lots for the all-campus elec-
tions last spring did not con-
tain the pictures of the candi-
dates. People have told me
that is the reason I won, but I
cannot harbour that thought;
but then, I cannot justify my
victory with any other reason,
either.
"Yes," he admitted, "my name
is in the Washtenaw Machine
Spoils System Year Book (1928-
29) too. All that I am today
I owe to my party."
Mr. Balkley, whose chief
hobby in life is combing his
hair and wearing flashy
clothes, has an ambition to be
a movie actor, but the advent
of the talkies has ruined his
aspirations.
"I look just like John Gilbert,"
he asserted. le neglected toI
state whether or not e looked
1like John Gilbert at the age of
12.
Mr. Balkley, who is affection-
ately called "Prtty Baby" by
his pals, is very fussy and is
continually preening himself.
For three years he has labored
ceaselessly to estab ish himself
firmly in the hearts of the
campus co-eds, but to no avail.
Either his good looks are a
myth or he needs to have his
face lifted.
And now since the theoretical
check-up of freshman who refuse
to wear pots is to be carried on by
mythical committee of the in-
nocuous Student Council, freshmen
will probably be seen wearing little
tags like the following:
p -o
POT APPLIED FOR-
0
Letter From Chamber
Of Commerce, Burma
Dear Lark:
We read in the current num-
ber of the Police Gazette that
your annual Junior Girls' Play
is contempating a road trip.
In view of this fact, we are in-
viting the entire cast to make a
tour of Burma. We think the
dry climate here would be just
the thing for that type of show.
Burma, you know, is pretty
hard up for entertainment all
the year round, and we should
appreciate anything, whereas

metropolises such as Detroit
are used to really good shows.
We feel that Burma is the one
place-in fact the place of
places-n the world to hold a
Junior Girls' Play. The audi-
ences . here can't understand
humour very well, and as we
understand that your produc-
tion runs on and on and on
without the faintest semblance
of humour, we repeat, Burma is
the place.
We feel you are too broad-
minded to keep such a perfor-
mance as the annual Junior
Girls' Play in Ann Arbor. We
feel further that you really
don't want it there and that
you are more than willing to
share it with the world. In fact,
we feel certain that you would
be more than willing to give the
whole company to some other
country.
Trusting that you will sym-
pathize with' our viewpoint and
.realizing that a trip to Burma
would be edifying if financially
disastrous, we extend our in-
vitation to you, not, you will
understand, with a laugh up
our s eeves, for there are no
sleeves in Burma.
More than sincerely,
J. Caesar Vestpocket,
Chairman Burma Chamber of

Music And Drama
0
TONIGHT: Play Production pre-
sent "Redemption" by Leo Tol-
stoy in the University HaI The- -
atre, beginning at 8:15 o'clock
sharp.
TONIGHT- Mimes present the
Ford-Belmont thriller, "In The
Next Room", in Mimes Theatre,
beginning at 8:15 o'clock.
THIS AFTERNOON: Palmer Chris-
tian will give an organ program
of Easter music in Hill Auditori-
um, beginning at 4:15 o'clock.
AMBITIOUS
Play Production tonight are
opening a run of six nights with
Tolstoy's immense drama, "Re-
demption". Those who saw Moissi
in the Reinhardt version will
understand what a tremendously
ambitious undertaking the Univer-
sity Hall group have on their
hands.
The original plan was to pro-
duce the Barrymore version, in
which the character Fedya is made
out a swash-buckling trader in
evil, but after a personal interview
with Moissi on the occasion when
the Play Production classes saw
"Redemption" performed, Director
Windt was persuaded to take on
the more, difficult task of the
Moissi character, a far more spirit-
ual personality,nmuch nearer Tol-
stoy's conception.
The result is that Play Produc-
tion have spent more effort on
this show than any previous and
their production should be a high
mark in their season of produc-
tions.
OUR LITERARY MEDIUM, TIE
INLANDER
"Inlander", campus literary mag-
azine which recently held a short
story contest in an effort to in-
terest both readers and writers in
the magazine, should be given
credit for its attempt to uphold a
literary tradition on the campus.
The present effort to increase the
group of the magazine's readers,
deservesto be commended, and,
should meet with success if the
staff itself makes the magazine one
that combines the printing of
material of a literary nature with
that which is interesting to the.
average college student.
The weary editors of the Inland-
er may be inclined to retort to
this statement rather sharply with
the remark that the average stu-
1 dent's taste never rises higher than
i Gargoyle, Life, or Judge.
Whether this be the case or not
(we ar-e inclined to believe it is
not) does not make a great deal of
difference. No art has ever pros-
pered without a public of some
kind, and it is up to the Inlander
to create its public by pleasing it.
Of course, if the magazine desires
to remain "select" and "literary",
it must expect only a very small
circle of readers. But on the other
hand, it need not sacrifice its lit-
erary standards to popularity. Be-
cause a play is "good theatre" does
not necessarily mean that it can-
not also have permanent worth,
and, because the average reader
finds amusement and humor in a
piece of writing does not mean that
it is not also something of a dis-
tinctly literary nature.
It would seem that in the past
the Inlander has been so anxious
to print things which they have
considered "delicate whimsy",

"beautiful, flowing prose", "ex-!
quisite characterization", or some
other sort of twaddle that theyl
have forgotten to print thingsI
which are readable and capable of
holding a reader's interest.
Finally, one of the chief causes
for the failure of "Inlander" is that
it has never succeeded in reaching
the whole of the rather large group
of students who are interested in1
creative writing and who wouldj
like to contribute to the magazine.
It is true that the staff has rather
dispiritedly mentioned in their edi-
torials at different times that they
want to get new contributors, andt
would like to have people tryout(
for the magazine, but the staff
has failed to get in active touch
with these people. If the work
they contribute of their own ac-
cord is not good, they are ignored.
If they do not take the initiative
and ask to attend group meetingsj
of the staff, they are seldom in-
vited.
Why the magazine does not have
a regular system of giving tryouts
an opportunity to show what they
can do on the magazine in a man-
ner similar to that used by any of
the other publications on the cam-
pus such as The Daily or the Mich-
iganensian, is not clear. Surely
there are a large number of fresh-
men on the campus who would be'
interested in working on such a

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Editorial Comment

NO MORE RAH-RAH BOYS?
(New York Evening Post)
Dean Gauss of Princeton hasI
been saying some encouragingC
things about the college under-
graduate. Heq declares it is his
firm belief, according to an inter-
view at Princeton, that the era of
rah-rah boys and coonskin coats.
is on the wane.
The collegiateism which Dean
Gauss rebuked as "nonsense,, fid-
dle-faddle, bumptious social im-
maturity complicated sometimes
though not always by acute class
consciousness" is a passing phase,
of youth. We are glad if it is dis-
appearing. We believe that evi-
dences of a new undergraduate at-
titude could be found at other col-
leges than Princeton. But we are
not so much concerned over its

(Programs subject to Change)
FIRST MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Wednesday, May 22, 8:15 p.m.
Soloists
SOPHIE BRASLAU, Contralto
RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVtRTURE RoM D MAJOR SUrrE....................Bach
ARIA, "SOUND AN ALARM," FROM "JUDAS MAC-
CABAEUS" ............... . ...............Handel
RICHARD CRoOKs
SUrT, Voa ORCEsTRA, "IBrRIA".................Debussy
ARIA, "An Mio FERNANDO"......................Donizetti
SOPImE BRASLAU
INTERMISSION
ARIAS (a) "PRIZE SoNG" PROM "MAESTERIs1NGER" Iagner
(b) ".LORI NGRIN'S NARRATIV~E" IROMi
LOHL NGRIN"........................Wagner
MR. CROOKS
SYMPHONIc POEM, "DoN JUAN"..................Strauss
"GYPS'Y SONGS".......... . ...... ... .....Brahms
Miss BRASI.AU
CONIEIrT WALTZ IN ......... ........Gla--ounow
SECOND MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Thursday, May 23, 8:15 p.mf.
Soloists
JEANNETTE VREELAND, Soprano
LAWRENCE TIBBETT, Baritone
THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
EARL4 V. MOORE,, Cota dor
PALMER-CHRISTIAN, Organist
PROGRAM
"A ;-ERMAN REQUIEM"...........................Brahms
SOLOISTS, CHORUS, ORCHESTRA, ORGAN
INTERMISSION
"iIa NEw Lt."......................Wolf-Verrai
SoLoisTs, CHORUS, ORCHESTRA, ORGAN
THIRD MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Friday, May 24, 2:30 p.m.
Soloists
BARRE HILL, Baritone
EFREM ZIMBALIST, Violinist
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
ORCHESTRAL ACCOMPANIMENT
FREDERICK STOCK AND JUVA HIGBEE,
Conductors
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "MARRIAG9 o FIGARO"................. ..ozart
"SPRING'S MESSENGER". ......................Sclimans&
"Hi SHALL FEED His FLocK" R:)M "MESSIAH"... Handel
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
ARIAS, (a) "ERI Tv" FROM "MASKED BA."........Verdi
(b) "FoRD'S SONG," PROM "FALSTAPF"........Verdi
BARRE HILL

CANTATA, "THe HUNTING OF THE SNARK".......Boyd
MR. ITALL, CHTIDRN'S CHORUS, ORCHESTRA
INTERMISSION
CoNCERro IN D, rOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA......Bralttms
EFR41M- Z IMBALIST
FOURTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Friday, May 24, 8:15 p.m.
Soloist
EDITH MASON, Soprano
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE 'SAKUNTALA".............. .......Goldmnark
ARIAS. (a) "DEn VIENI NON TARDAR," FROM
"MARRIAGE OF FIGARO".......................Mozart
(b) "BATn, BA'rT;," FROM "DoN JUAN"....M ozart
EDITH MASONk
RHAPSODY, "AM RICA"...............................Bloch
INTV'JiRMISSIOAT
ARIA, "DEg'UIS L x JouR" ROM "Louis..". G...Charpen tier
MISS MASON
SYMPToNWc DANC9s FROM "DiEBASKISCHE
VENUs" .........Wetster'
ARIAS. (a) "ENTRANC8 SONG" fROM "MADAME
BU'rTrRFLV"............................ Puccini
B wTT aRtLy " ... , , . . . , ............Puccarsi
MISS MASON
SLAvoNIC DANex, A FLAT........................Dvorak
FIFTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Saturday, May 25, 2:15 p.m.
Soloist
IOSEF IIOVMANN. Pianist
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
SYMPHONY, IN U FLAT.. .....................Mor art
CONCERTO UOR CELLO AND ORCHISTRA..............stock
INVTERJMISSION
CoNCERTO. IN D MINOR, FOR PIANO AND
ORCHV: kyk .. ................ ..........Rub rnsscin
JoSss I OFMANN
SIXTH MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
Saturday, May 25, 8:15 p.m.
Soloists
-MARION TELVA, Contralto
PAUL ALTHOUSE, Teror
RICHARD BONELLI, Baritone
WILLIAM GUSTAFSON, Bass
THE CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
TIIE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
EARL V. MOORE, Conductor
PROGRAM
"SAMSON AND DZLILAHII," AN OPERA IN THREE ACTS..
................................ .. Saint-Saens

tives in Minnesota there are 30 in- manifestations as over the collegi-
telligent men who can boast of, ateism which the dean admits is
clear consciences. often found in alumni circles.
The law which has been thus 1 If the loyalty to alma mater so
sustained permits a' judge to arbit- carefully fostered by alumni as-'
rarily enjoin the publication of a 'sociations meant an intelligent in-
newspaper which regularly prints terest in the educational programs
malicious, scandalous, and defam- which our universities face, it
atory matter. No regulation is would be a grand thing. Too often
made relative to the type of things its sole result is a rah-rah spirit*
which may be taken under these which puts the undergraduates
heads. An organ of public opin- themselves to shame. It cannot be

SCHEDULE OF TICKETS

Season tickets-$6.00, $7.00 and $8.00 each, except that if

All seats in the Second Balcony (top Balcony) $b.00.

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