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May 16, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-16

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THE MICHICAN DAILY

v.

ublished every morning except Monday
ing the University year by the Board in
1trol of Student Publications.
ember of Western Conference Editorial
ociation.
he Associated Press is exclusivel en.
d to the use for republication of all news
atches credited to it or not otherwise
.ited in this paver and the lpcal news pub-
ed herein.
ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter. Special rate
postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
ter GeneraL
ubscription by carrier, $4.oo; by mfail,
frices:.Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
] Street.
hones: Editorial, 4925; Business 212r4.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
10 H. CHAMBERLIN
for ... Ellis P. Merry
r i higan Weekly ,Charle.E. Behymer
vs Editor............Philip C. Brooks
, ..Lii....... .Courtlanu C. Smith
men's Editor......... .Marian L. Welles
its Editor........Herbert E. Vedder
rater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
stant City Editor....Richard C. Kurvinak
Night Editors
ert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
i J. Kern Nelson . Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
her Anderson Sally Knox
garet Arthur John H. Maloney
xA. Bochnowaki Marion McDonald
n Campbell Charles S. Monroe
ie Church Catherine Price
chard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
ence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
garet Gross Rita Rosenthal
borg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Sorne Follmer Eleanor. Scribner
es B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
)ert J. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
ne E.Gruser Howard F. Simon
:e Hagelshaw George E. Simons
ph l,. Howell Rowena Stillman
Wallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
rles. R. Kaufman, George Tilley
iam F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
rence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
ald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
c L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
stant Manager...George H. 'Annable, Jr.
ertising............Richard A. Meyw
ertising .............Edward L. Hulse
ertising........John W. Ruswinckel
unts................Raymond Wachter
ulation.........George B. Ahn, Jr.
lication.............Harvey Talcott
Assistants
rge Bradley Ray Hofelich
ie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
es Carpenter. James Jordan
rtes. K. Correll Marion Kerr
>ara Cromell Thales N. Lenington
-y Dively Catherine McKinven
ie V. Egeland. Dorothy Lyons
Felker Alex K.° Scherer
herine Frohne George Spater
glass Fuller Ruth Thompson
rice Greenberg \Herbert E. Vrnum
mn Gross Lawrence, Walkley
. Hammer Hannah Wallen
W. Hammer
WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1928.
ht Editor-JAMES B. FREEMAN

another light, however, it seems that
any belated attempt to force the Pres-
ident into a third term contest can
hardly meet with justification for
while he is completing his period in
office in an acceptable manner, it can
hardly be said that he is sufficiently
outstanding among the list of presi-
dents to be the first accorded such
an honor. Then, too, he has express-
ed a desire to remai out of the con-
test. It must also be remembered that
the Republican party is in no imme-
diate danger of defeat in November.
These factors together with the genu-
ine popularity that is Mr. Hoover's
would seem to suggest that Pennsyl-
vania's logical step is to list its 76
delegates among the Hoover support-
ers.
Students attending the geology sum-
mer camp are to visit some coal mines
as part of their course. No wonder
the poor coal miners strike every
year.
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonyous communications wil be
disregarded. The names of communi.
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub.
lished.-should .not e construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
AND FURTHERMORE-
To the editor:
I noticed in Friday's Daily that Mr.
S. T., '30, has dug up the old question
concerning the Honor System. I think
that this gentleman made several
sweeping statements that would be
quite hard to prove and are probably
false.
The honor system seems to be mis-
understood by most people on the
campus. ° It is not a system by which
the Engineering school is making hon-
est men out of professional crooks.
This system is intended to eliminate
cheating.to a greater extent than the
old policeman system.
I have had several classes in the
Lit school and many in the Engine
school and I have noticed that cheating
is much less in the Engine school.
Mr. S. T., '30, says that "everybody
knows that the system is not working
over there." Now, just who is this
"everybody?" I have found that the
number that think the system is a
success is equally as large as the
number which have no faith in it.
However, I have also found that
those who do have faith in this sys-
tem have come in direct contact with
it. But those. who have ideas and
never try them seem to think-tht
isi't "theoreal." This'IsnOrob-
lem to be solved by sitting at your
desk and figuring it out but it is one
that we must give to those who
try it and see what happens. In other
words, research work and theory go
hand in hand.
These honest Engineers that Mr. S.
T., '30, spoke of are poor sticks. I
don't know how he can call them
honest. The system requires that any-
one having been seen cheating be re-
ported' to the Honor committee. Now,
if these Engineers saw these books
planted in the halls and didn't report
it, I am of the opinion that they are
cowards or crooks.
We always find people standing on
the outside who have never come in
contact. with the honor system but
they can tell about more cheating
than anyone who is under the rules of
the honor system.
Mr. S. T., '30, seems to think that1
it is quite easy to receive good marksl
under the rules of the honor system.

I would suggest that he take a course
in the Engineering college and, ac-
cording to his "theory," his average
will be lifted should he wish to cheat.
I would further suggest that he be
ready to leave school because his
marks won't be all that will be lifted.
The Honor committee is continually
lifting Engineers out of school with1

music , INJUNS,
.POEMS, I
NONSENSE J
THERE WERE A lot of juniors,I
who, on watching the ceremonies
about the Tappan Oak and remember-
ing the things that happened just
about two years and two months pre-
viously, decided that they didn't want1
to be heap big injun big-shots any-
way.
FOR THOSE grapes of the sour va-
riety there is nothing to answer ex-
cept that, fun or no fun, the warrior
braves are to be congratulated. Con-
gratulated first, and cautioned next,
thus:
* * *

SPECIAL NOTICE
TO MICHAGAMUA

(Courtesy of B. anll G. Boys)

PLEASE

DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

AND ALSO, when you drive your
horses to get hold of the managers
next door (that's as close as they
came to us), keep the horses from
making paths, too.
* * *
BOLT'S INDIAN EPIC
(reprinted by request)
Listen to this tale of romance,
Tale of Indian warriors cold-
In the rainy, hunting season
Came they forth, those warriors
mighty
Scarred from many a campus battle
Student council, Daily, football.,
Forththey romped to get um pale-
face,1
Paleface who had dared to trespass!
On the ground of happy hunting.
Covered with a coppery brick-dust
Came those screaming, yelling redmen
To the mighty oak of Tappan,
Where. there waited trembling pale-
face.
Icy waters, scourging rawhide,
Used they there to test the paleface,
While the lowly student body
Gathered round to watch their prank-
Ing.
Seizing then their chastened captives]
Forth they bore them to the Union
Wigwam of the conquering Indian.

THE SECOND TRIENNIAL
The past week end saw the holding
by Michigan alumni. oftheir second
annual triennial conference, described
by observers as the greatest reunion
ever to be held. by.the,.graduates of an
American university. More than, 400
alumni coming from every part of the
country were present. The speakers
included Presidents Frank, Brooks,
Jessup, and Little of Wisconsin, Miss-]
ouri, Iowa, and Michigan, respectively,
as well as Regent James O. Murfin of
Detroit.-
The concluding banquet on Friday
night witnessed a whole hearted en-
dorsement of the University and its
policies by the alumni, saw the "alum-
ni university" project favorably re-
ceived, and was marked by the an-
nouncement that Detroit alumni, have
raised a total of $25,000 toward the
erection of men's dormitories on the
Michigan campus. The assembled
clubs also pledged their support to
the erection of the proposed Burton
Memorial campanile, and members of
the Ann Arbor alumni club announced
that they weresponsoring the drive
for funds which would lead to the
erection of the edifice.
Returning home, President Little ex-
pressed himself as highly pleased with
the sessions. And, it seems he may
well be. The alumni have shown that
they are heartily in accord with his1
program. But what is probably evenI

f HEAT ER
BOOKS
MUSIC
TONIGHT: The first concert of
the May Festival given in Hill
auditorium; begins at 8 o'clock.
* * *
THE NEW ORGAN
A review by Harold May
The featured artist of last night's
concert, the new Frieze memorial or-
gan, was all, or nearly all, that the
School of Music manifestos claimed
for it-to do it full, complete, and
critical justice would require an or-
ganist of some ability and one who is
enthusiastic about every detail of his
instrument. The tone in every divi-
sion of the organ is full and of good
quality, that of the bass is particularly
powerful and sustaining. There is
a bewildering enough show of stops
and other complexities to arouse some
female organist to become a latter
day St. Cecelia. It seems that the
organ is trying to do for music chat
the Heroic drama tried to do for dra-
ma-introduce the splendor and eclat
of larger and more complex pageant
into a place almost too small to hold
it. It is toocbad that with all the
musical voices at his command the
organist has only ten fingers, two feet
and two knees; this limitation was felt
in much earlier days, for it was Bach
-or was it Bach?--who in despair
at working in a much needed tone,
finally used his nose to produce it.
The first number to be formally
played on the new organ, "Toccata,
Adagio and pEgue in C," by Bach, was
the most. noteworthy piece presented;
it was almost the only one that was
not stamped in. every phrase with the
names of a hundred other composers.
The adagio, In contrast to the noisy
tocatta, which Mr. Christian played
so that, in places, you could not hear
the music for the organ, was subdued
and of a lovely lyric quality; the
Fugue, which followed was a marvel
of polyphony, the most satisfactory
kind of music for the organ, and the
best, in any case for the listener. An-
other piece played by Palmer Chris-
tian was "Lanidscape in Mist," (Karg-
Elert) in which the opening bars
seemed to have been cribbed from
Debussy. Mr. Christian also played'
a choral in A minor of Cesar Franck's
and prelude to "La, Wemoiselle Elui"
(Debussy). Mr. DeLamarter's pro-
gram consisted of Cantabile, Symph-
ony VI; Cantilene, Symphony "Ro-
mane;" Final, Symphony "Gothique"
all by Widor. These numbers were
of considerably better quality than the
greater part of Mr. Christian's pro-
gram; the Final, Symphony "Goth-
ique," ponderous and august, was the
best of them.
Thursday's May Festival Program
Soloists: Marie Montana, soprano,
Merle Alcock, Contralto, Tudor Davies,
Tenor, Raymond Koch, Baritone,
Chase Baromeo, Bass, Palmer Chris-
tian, Organist, University Choral Un-
ion, Children's Chorus, Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra, Earl V. Moore, Con-
ductor.
Saint Francis of Assisi......Pierne
An Oratorio in a Prologue and
Two Parts
Cast of Characters-
Saint Francis........ Tudor Davies
The Leper'
The Voice of Christ ... Chase Baromeo
Friar Leon......... Raymond Koch

Friar Angelo...........Otis Patton
Friar MasseoP........hillip Culkin
Sister Care ......... Marie Montana
The Lady Poverty ... Merle Alcock
Birds ............. Children's Chorus
Friends of St. Francis, People, etc.
-University Choral Union
ANENT.THE OPERA
Those who are already praising the
embryonic 1928 Michigan Union Opera
are telling us about the great newness
and originality combined with actu-
ally good music and real voices, all
of which at the outset sounds very,
very good.> However, we are inclined
to' wonder whether such will actually
be the case, judging by recent efforts,
which have failed to incorporate those
ideas. But at any rate, if they are
sincere, there appears to be a chance
for a good opera, really being pro-
duced here.
We are told, furthermore, that men
from the glee club have been urged
to try out for the choruses and cast
positions, so that some real voices
may sound out to the four corners of
the theaters in place of the weak, tin-
trained voices, which unquestionably
have been present in past operas.
Moreover, there is a plan adopted not
to have merely one person write the
music for the entire show, but rather
give many persons the opportunity to
display their wares before the com-
mittee so that the best available talent
may be used in the next presentation.
'Roy Hoyer, hailed as the leading

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1h

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What Shakes
says about CoC

1'

Thus,
Heap
Heap
Hieap

there came to Michlgamua,
big camnpus politician,
big publications magnate,
big dumb but mighty athlete.
* * *
h1MORTARBOARD

peare
a rsCola
s, ]elicious and Refresingf

THE FAIR, only fair, coeds also had
proceedings for the honoraries yes-
terday. But they're not going to be
initiated until Sunday. Must be that
the Indian braves will want to cele-
brate with the bricklayers over the
week end. More congratulations.
* * *
EXACTLY ONE year ago the same
things were happening as now. Re-
member the razzing Timmie Hay gave
Hobbs on the S. C. A. tag day? The.
only thing that resembled a tag in
the geologist's lapel yesterday was
that little red ribbon which must be
sewed on.
* * *
THE ORGAN FROZE

"A dish fit for
the gods"
Et tu, Brute! Well, Brutus cer-
tainly knew his stuff-so well
that you can easily imagine
him saying further:

,Refresh Yourse
-C CSThe Coca-ColaCompany,
JULIUS CAESAR
Act II, Scene H
8rnillion aday---IT HAD TO BE GOOD-TO GET WHERE

their toe. In fact. TI1know Tnohbetter'

more significant, the triennial's big-
gest purpose and the one that it most
thoroughly achieved, was that of
drawing the alumni and their univer-
sity into a closer relationship and
understanding.
THE MELLON PRONOUNCEMENT
With the race for convention dele-
gates in two parties entering on what
seems to be virtually the home stretch
as but three state primaries remain
to be held after this week, a great
deal of significance may well be at-
tached to the recent statements of Se-
cretary Mellon in which it was hinted
that President Coolidge may be "draft-
ed" by the Republican party to run
for a third term while declaring that
Secretary Hoover "seems to come the
closest to the standard that we set
for this great office."
Although apparently an endorse-
ment of the commerce secretary, the
Mellon pronouncement seems in many
ways to indicate a somewhat hostilek

means to get a trip to the Treasurer's
office for a refund and a vacation. This
vacation is a nice one, too. It lasts
a whole year. It is surprising how
many take this vacation each year.
This professor that Mr. S. T., '30,
spoke of is at least polite. During
exams it is only a question of where
shall he sleep, be it in front of the
class or in his office. This professor
evidently refused to sleep in front of
the class and I think he uses good
judgment.
This question can't be worked out
on paper. We have too many scien-
tists today who prefer to sit at their
desk and try to solve a problem by
some "theory" they have advanced.
However, all good results in science
come from some research work. In
other words, the system must be tried
out and then we may be able to talk
about what we know and not what
we think we know.
That is the way the problem ofl
eliminatiig cheating will be solved

b

LAST NIGHT, as the preliminary to
the May Festival, the new Frieze in-
strument was dedicated. The general
public, with the exception of children,
was invited to attend.

MAYBE THE hundred or so seem-
ingly disappointed people seen lagging
out of Hill auditorium yesterday did
not like the Saint-Saens, Delamarter,
and Bach compositions.!
OR MAYBE
ON THE OTHER hand, maybe they
mistook the children sign for those
"under 21" and expected to find a
flaming movie and were disappointed.
Who knows?
* PERSONALLY, WE don't expect to
take in the Festival this year. Not.
being particularly savage, we don't
need to be soothed, for one thing.
* * *
THEN, TOO, and this is more im-
portant a reason, our traditional eye-
sore representing the column on the

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