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May 09, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

hVEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1928.

T HE MlcIIGAN DAILY

. ___

PVDfITIAN IBICTIOD GERiMAN CAR WHICH IS EXPECTED
LAE~JIIUI~UIIL~iUIITO MAKCE FIVE MILES A MyINUTE
LEAVES ONFRTLEGl '!
0 TIP ITD RCTI

HOBBS WILL TOU41 AT' GERMAN
' PORT BEFORE SAILING
FOR GII"EEMGAN
BELKNAP WILL 60 LATER
Three Trtins.Oce~ie 1'Flight Ma'
Use Mt. Evans Sttion For (lase
Durig Sniiirer
Prof. William I-I. Hobbs of the
geology department and directW,
of the University Greenland expedi-
tions will leave Ann Arbor tomor-
row andl sail from New York for
Bremen, Germany at midnight Friday
on the first leg of his trip to Mt.
Evans, Greenland, where the north-
ern weather observatory of the Un-
iversity is located.
The other members of the expedi-
tion, Ralph L. Belknap, second in
command, L. R. Schneider, aerolo-
gist, Duncan Stewart, assistant geo-
' dosist and geologist to Belknap, and
Francis M. ;Baer, radio expert, will
sail May 19 from New York aboard
the S." S. ;Bergensjord ;for Oslo,
Norway. The entire party will leave
Copenhagen for Holstensborg June 1
aboard the Danish government ship
Disko.
Will Cartr Walrus
At H-olstensborg they will charter
the motor-schooner Walrus, used for
the same purpose last year, to con-.
vey them to the head of Soendra
Stroenjfjord, where the Mt. Evans
station is located. C. R. Kallquis of
the United States Weather bureau,
aerologist on last year's expedition
will return to civilization on the
R boat'that takes Professor Hobbs and
the other men in.
Professor Hobbs, Belknap, and Ste-
wart will leave Greenland about1
September 1, leaving Schneider, Carl-
son, and Baer at Mt. Evans for the
winter observations. According to
- present plans, Professor Hobbs does
not plan to maintain a force at the
station after 929, but he expects
that the station will be taken over
by an International organization.
At least one European flight, pro-
bably two, and possibly three will
mnake a base at Camp Lloyd near M.
Evans, on the shore of the fjord, dur-
ing the summer, for transoceanic
flights between the United States and
Europe via the arctic circle route.
Bert J. Hassell -will fly a singe mo-
tored Stinson plane, which is being
x finished this week at Northville, from
Rockford, Illinois, to Copenhage!i
with a stop in Greenland.
To Refuiiel At Mt. Evns
Hassell will refuel his plane at
Mt. Evans with gas which will be
taken in by the Hobbs expedition.
The landing place which he will use
is a long sand flat believed to be
suitable for the purpose. Speaking of'
the landing place yesterday, Profes-
sor Hobbs said, "'While we have pro-
vided photographs of the possible
- landing field near Camp Lloyd, we
are assuming no responsibility for
its being an adequate field" A flying~
man to be chosen by Hassell may be
added to the expedition as a regular
member to advise in aeroplane mat-
ters,' according to Professor Hobbs.
Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh land-
ed at Ford airport yesterday morn-
ing for a conference with Major
Thomas Lanphier. It is rumored that
he and Lanphier are planning one of
the other flights to Europe this sum-
mer via Mt. Evans. Professor Hobbs
was recently called into conference
r with Lanphler and William Mayo
chief engineer for the Ford Motr
company, with regard to the feaA~.
bility of the arctic route to Europe
for airplane travel.
Lindbergh and Lanphier, althoutith
they denied the rumors, are said to
be awaiting the return of Henry
Ford from Europe to learn whether

the Ford Motor Company will lend
them the use of a plane for the flight.

..
A .rr r.....
German invcnt~ii s Iiave ('leeopcu (I fl,\V automobile ipropelledl by
rocket system in which they hope I.,) f Lain speed of 430Oilehsin hour. Th'
machine is equipp~ed with i12 cyli'nider' steel ch 'iiilit'i AIfrem wh ich p lowerful
rockets aro discharged by an (l'&tric spark linked with control at driver's
feet.
SADLR ,NEW ENGINEERING DEAN, r
HAS HAD7,_..., ., f DIVERSIFIED. . EXPERIENCE. _........ .... . 7 ..1t_. __ __ ____ _.__

P! rot. Herbert C'. Sadler, dead elect
of the Colleges of Engineering anid
Architecture, has led an interesting
and varied career.
He came to the Ujniversity of Michi-
igan in the fall of 1900 as the head of
the newly organlized department oif
naval architecture and marine engin-
eering. At that time lie was only 28
years old. He receivedl his primary
education at Dulwich college, London,
and at the University of Glasgow,
where lie received the dlegree oft
bachelor of science in 1.893, and his
doctor's degree in 1902, two years
after he came to the University.
Throughiout his whole period of ediu-
cation he served during his spare timeo
as a shipwright, making ap lractical
study of steel ship cnstruct ion. Ail
the time of his aplpoint ment to MVIdi-!
igan hie was assistant to Sir Jobhn

lie was a wardtedl the honorary degree
of LL.D. fronm the University of Glas-
go w.
Along with his University work,
Dean-elect Sadler has acted as con-
sultant. to many of the Great Lakies
'steamship companies, and was the de-'
signer of the two boats, the "Greater
D~etroit'' and the "Greater 11Th ffa lo,''
thle largest passenger vessels in1 the
wVor'l engagedI in inland water navi-
gation. The 51 alard type of' the
Great Lakes freight steamers now unm-
versally -employed is also the resuilt
of h~s investigations in the naval tanik
in the Engineering college. The -fed-
eral governmlent has engaged D~eani-
elect Sadler oft' a number of investi-
gat ion >. lie has acted in various ca-
-pacifi es as consulting naval architect.
to the B~oa rd of U n ied Stales Armya
engineers, anid as a minber of the
. 'Cehie IcO adisryi5 b oard and the
Amnerican 131r( an of Shipping. Re-
cent y I10 has bee n a ppoint~ed ch airmana
{.t Ilie Commit te oni'Na vol Arch it cc-
I hire for the (reat. Lakes (listriict.
D)urinig fime VWoAl war hie w"Is en-
gaged icpemntlwronsill-
nma nimes 1and I lie p{rotection lofimr-
chanlt ves's 'Is. Laeri, a's ('o11Slii)g
na val a rchit ect to the10 United St Ate'
Shipping hoard, lhe had charge of the
coinstruction of all inerchailit vsseOls
h)uilt during the war.
'MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW
os AY STI"A WIIIs
CLAS4
TRAVELERS CHEQU'ES. ETC. !
I " 't, E.G.Iuebler, Steamship Agt.
ti Leomd&$Bode&'61A.J rn., $xt''i

THREE SPANISH, PLAYS
TO BE GIVEN: TONIGHT
Im~ soefldad 11isplaic('91%e Proga m
InS~a ra Cas ,wel Anmgel l al
At S O'lock
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
La Sociedad Ilispanicm will give its
annual program tonight at S o'clock
in Sara. Caswell Angell hal, present-
ig three one-act plays in Spanish.
The plays, "El Enamorado," "El Mil-
agro," andI "La Plancha (Ie a Mar-
quesa," are being produced under the
supervision of Prof. del1 Toro, assist-
edl by Mr. Michaud, Mr. Bartley, Prof.
Albaladejo, and Prof. Kenyon.
"El Enamnorado" is a drama of
Spanish nobility, the plot centering'
aroundl the poor gentleman's undying
love for his queen. The leading roles
will be taken by Theodora Maloy, '29,
and Douglas Witemore, Grad.
The setting of -il Miagro," is a
modern comedy by Linares Rivas,
dealing with the efforts of a bold law-
yer, to make the acquaintance of a
young lady.
j"'La Plaiicha de la Marquesa" is the
amusing account. of the trials of a
marquise who mistakes the home of
her son's friend for the scene of an
auction-sale.
Advance ticket sales for the per-
formance indicate a very large .ad-
inne., but there will e tickets, priced
50) cents, on sale at the doors. Mem-
bers of the society may 'secure their
tickets from the treasurer, also at
the door.
Ani English synopsis of each Play-
let will be on the program for the
benefit, of those who do not readily
undterstand Spanish.
Ii I
,141.11 fiune to oter frtoiuit lBsi-
Bess0 'Im'aiimis You igeed.:Gtl11s
pr'epa:re you for a. good positioiiu
Enter )1Mnday
-.j
tuswqp OU ,tc- aSOURf14m

i

::
,.,, .
x:
Ft'
:;( .
A
lrt"

i1 a g 0

One thing we brag aout is
knowing how to fix Radios
WEDEMEYERSRADIO ERICE

Prof. Hlerber't C. Sadle'r

2 10 E. Washington

Phone 3694

I

Harvard Riles, .then professor of nav-
al architecture at Glasgow.a
Soon after Professor Sadler caine to
the University of Michigan the con-
struction of a'model testing tank was
decided upon, and its design, as well
as that of its accompanying equip-
ment, was placed in his charge. When
completed it was the ,second tank of
its character in the country and the
only one in an educational institute.
Here research work in ship cons! rue-!
tion has been carried on ever sinmce
its construction. Professor Sadler has
received international recognition for
his work in ship design. Last summer
PORTABLE
TYPE WRITERIS -
Corona, Underwood,
Remington, Royal.
We nave all makes.
Some In colored duco finishes.
0. D. MORRILL
17 N~iekelq A reade. Phone 6415.

0

.
Send Mother Gilbert's Chocolates
Beautiful Appropriate Greetings
1111 iSo l iia nlsty
REDFOR GOLF CLUB
([Forimerly Jleilfomd (ouinlry (Cuil
Now Open to the Public
Michigan's Sportiest Golf Course
Available for Fraternity Parties
DINING AND DANCING
Berg' Road, Bel w in 7-M114 amid Grand h1~ ire tReflord
'1' I) iX" O) lt-A-ixi 1' i I.WE IN

p...........i......................... i.Y~i ... ".. .. _.....°
*Excellent Opportunity for Summer Work
Calling on exeeutives sellinmg ainew visible card'f sysemi
for recording securities. Good c iimisstoii, liraininig andi
* sales experience. O~ffer's a permanIent, coitimeciion Awill
- a, real future.
K. J. Guhne, Fort Shelby H1otel, Detroit
Appointmienits may be midote for May 11 amid 1. o iterview s granted
unless mrtiged for b~efore' Friday c 11

' l......".,...."..~...............YS................................

- - "
i

I

Fraternities and So ro riti e s
Now is the time to be thinking of your
year books or annuals.
LetUs Give You an Estimate
PRINTING THAT ATTRACTS

I

Whipped by
Roaring Winds!
Buffeted by
Angry Waves !
S1. r)
r'Kr

I

I 'ly M

k ORI II I III I11U

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