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May 08, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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ROGERS TO ADDRESS
PHYSICAL EDUCATION'
STUDENTSWEDNESDAY
ADMISSION WILL BE EXTENDED
TO GENERAL PUBLIC ACCORD.-
DING TO ANNOUNCEMENT
APPEARED IN DETROIT
Calls Kindergarten Instructor One
Of Best Teachers Of Physical
* Education In America
Dr. James Rogers, Director of the
National Physical Education Serv-
ice, will speak at 8 o'clock next Wed-
nesday evening in room 21, Water-
man gymnasium on a subject to be
announced dlater., The address has
bee planned primarily for the men
and women of the school of physical
education, but the general public is
also invited..
At the national convention of the
American Physical Education As-
sociation held last week in Detroit,
Dr. Rogers, who is president of the
department of School Health and
Physical Education of that organiza-
tion, gave one of the principal ad-
dresses. His subject was "Education
through Physical Education." Aiong
other facts which he brought out in
his address he stated that the kinder-
garten teacher is one of the best
teachers of physical education in
America. "Plato 'was 'right when he
said that the only education that a
boy receives up to the time he is
nine years old is physical education.
It is known now that children learn
through their hands and through
their muscles."
"Physical education," declared Dr.
Rogers in Detroit, "'has nothing to
do with gymnasiums, equipment, or
drills and exercises, but everything
to do with health, sportsmanship and
training for leisure. There is alto-
gether too much sports for sport's
sake and not enough sports for
sportsmanship's sake. Play should not
be for amusement as much as for de-
velopment of play habits for leisure
time."
When interviewedyesterday in Ann
Arbor, Dr. Rogers said that he could
with perfect truth say something
complimentary about the University
of Michigan, in connection with this
subject of health education. "The
University of Michigan was the first
in this business of intramurals. 'he
great need of this country at present
is for a game for every boy and girl,
and boys and girls in every game.
Major and minor sports do not exist,
because football, basketball, and
baseball do not, include everyone. In
a tournament held among the city-.
Farke in Chicago recently, the decid-
ing fifteen points lie in a kite-flying
enntest. Scores of boys in the city of
Chicago had piled up thousands of
ponts in games of all sorts, but at
last the decision was to be made be-
tween two parks over as simple a
feat as kite-flying. It was won by a
crippled boy; Palmer park was vic-
torious, and this little cripple was the
hero of the day. No subject in the
school c'rriculum has been recei -
ing more support throughout the
country in 'he last ten years than
health and physical educalon.
WOMENFEATURED
IN ART EXHIBITION
Women figi red rather prominently
in the exhibition of paintings recent-
ly shown in Ann Arbor through the
courtesy of the Art Institute of Chi-
cago. Of the eight women represent--
ed irore than half have chosen wom-
en and young girlhood for the sub-
ject of their work.
There is Mrs. Marie Danforth

Page who was awarded a bronze me-
dal at the Sesqui-Centennial Interna-
tional Exposition held in Philadelph-
ia in 1926. Mrs. Page's picture is
entitled "Marnie, Page, and Ginger,"
and is a. study of three girls.
Wenonah Bell is credited with the
"Woman in Blue Dress", Theresa F.
Bernstein with "New' .England La-
dies," and Alice Kent Stoddard with
"The Buttercup Dress."
Iltllftt l liliiililli II IIfI III II ill
TWO VACANCIES
in my summer European travel group,
due to unavoidable withdrawal of
seniors.
MRS. I. W. CAKE
1145 Washtenaw. Dial 3597.1
fiflitftttftt ttRl fll l EH ltttitlftllfllllll
WHAT PRIMI
E 3.PE?
5..
VERY LITTLE (y).
11,.US~aL AL IN40
S.S. "ESTONIA"&S.S. "LITUANiA'
ONLYOU S S!N onS
> Can and second cb..spm

SOCIAL DIRECTOR OF LAW CLUB
ACTS AS HOSTESS AND MANAGER

To the average student and outsider
the manager of the Lawyer's club is
something of a mystery.
Just as the dormitories have their!
managers the club has its. However,
the duties differ somewhat.
One woman acts both as social di-
rector and manager of the club. Her
work tends to run more toward the
management than the social side. She
overEĀ±ees the hiring of employees, the
assignment of rooms after entrance
has been granted, and has general
management of the different depart-
ments. She has nothing to do with
the selection of the residents, this
being done by the membership com-
mittee of the Board of Govern-ors.
She aids the men with their parties
and acts as hostess of the club at
all times.
The present director is Miss Inez
NEW FIELD HOUSE
TO BE FORMALLY
OPENED WITH TEA
When the new field house is thrown
open to visitors tomorrow afternoon
and evening, it is expected that a
great many students, faculty mem-
bers, and townspeople will take ad-
vantage of this first opportunity to
see the athletic building in its com-
pleted form. Music, simple refresh-
ments, and trips through the build-
ing will be features of 'the formal
opening.
The hostesses will be assisted by
members of the Wopien's Athletic as-
sociation who will conduct parties
of inspection. Those who will ,re-
ceive wvf, l be Mrs. Clarence Cook
Little, Mr. and .Mrs. John Waite, Mr.
and Mrs. Everett Brown, Director or
Athletics Fielding H Yost and Mrs.
Yost, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Aigler,
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Frayer, and
the physical education staff.
In .the afternoon the reception will
continue from four until six o'clock,
and tea will be served on the ter-
race, the weather permitting. In the
evening the hours are from eight un-
til ten. For those who care to dance,
an opportunity will be offered in the
evening but not in the afternoon.

Bozorth who came here at the opening
of the club in 1924. Before coming to
Michigan, Miss ozorth had consid-
erable experience along this line. She
is a graduate of Oregon State, tak-
ing her degree in institutional man-
agement. She has also taken advanc-
ed work at both the University of
Illinois and the University of Chi-
cago. At the close of her undergrad-
uate work she was connected with
the College Tea room in San Fran-
cisco during the year of the exposi-
tion. Later she was with a comnerc-
ial tea room in a department store at
Portland, Oregon.
During the war Miss Bozorth was
stationed at Camp Taylor, Louisville,
La., acting as an army dietitian. La-
ter she was head dietitian in the army
hospital at Fort Henry in Baltimore.
Previous to coming to Ann Arbor
she was director of the dormitories
on the campus of the University -ot
Montana where she was also ssit-
ant professor of home economics.
LEAGUE TO' INSTALL
OFFICERSTHURSDAY'
Installation of the officers of the
Women's league for next year will
take place at the annual banquet of
the organization, which will be held
on Thursday, May 10, from 5:30 to
7 o'clock at the new women's field
house.
Tickets for the affair may be got-
ten any day from 2 to 6 o'clock at
Barbour gymnasium for the price of
$1 each. Sorority presidents may get
all the tickets for their organizations
if they wish, and all sororities and
dormitories are urged to come in
groups.
BLVE BIRD
Sandwich Shop
568 Williams
Really advertising dinners and
lunches. 15 different sandwiches.
Be a regular customer. Table, booth
and couniter service,
Phone 9604

LANTERN NIGHT AIDESI
Ten Women Aides And ,Four Leaders
Are Selected From Each of
Four Classes
WILL MEET WVEDNESDAY I
Ten women from each class have
been selected to act as aides for thM
Lantern Night procession, which is
to be held, Tuesday, May 15. Besides
these aides, four more women from-
each class have been chosen to leadl
the line of march.
Senior women, who will lead the
line of march are, as follows: Gladys
Appelt, Elizabeth Nutt,, Laura Os-
good and Marian Welles. The aides
from the senior class are, Ellen
Groff, Helen Hawkins, Margaret
Hawkins, Phyllis Loughton, sean
M4Kaid J'osephip'e Norton, Evelyn
Ogborn, Bernice Staebler, Arlene Un-
sworth, and Marion Van Tuyl.
Junior leaders of the line will be,
Marie Hartwig, Cynthia Hawkins,
Betty Smither, and Mary White; and
the aides will be: Helen Brown, Jes-
sie Church, Hilda Mary Evans, Liaine
Holmes, Vera Johnston, Mary Alice
Moore, Virginia Reid, and Elizabeth
Wellman.
Sophomore leaders are: Margaret
Bush, Helen Fellows, Margaret Ohl-
sen, and Jean Wallace, and theIr
aides, Eloise Avery, Margaret Bab-
cock, Louise Cody, M arjorie Follmer,
Dorothy Griffith, Virginia .Losee,
Dorothy McKee, Marjorie Muffley,
Margaret Sibley and Gertrude Sm-ith.
Women of the freshmnan class who
will lead the line are: Margaret Ea-
mon, Helen Jones, Roberta Reid, and

P to R T S
Dlaily Bulletin of Sportswomen -----

NOTICES
1I

Urge Extensive Use
Of Bowling Alleys
All who are connected with the Un-
iversity of Michigan are prIvileged to
make use of the bowling alleys in the
new field house according to notice
in, the Daily Official bulletin on Sun-
day. Student bowlers are to be seen
at the field house every day, but so
far wives of members of the faculty
and other people connected with the
University of Michigan have not a-
vailed themselves of their right.
A small charge of 10c per string of
tickets is made by those who have
the alleys in charge in order to cob-
er the cost of upkeep and the hire
of pin-boys.
Jane Robinson; and the aides of this
class are to be: Helen Cheever, Mar-
ion Durand, Catherine Hard, Jane
Howard, Helen Humphery, Frances
Jennings, Ruth Marshall, Albertina
Maslem, Hermine Soukup, and Ruth
Van Tuyl.
A meeting o2 all the aides and
line leaders will be held Wednesday
at 5 o'cock in the gymnasium. It
any woman is unable to attend this
meeting, she must call Nellie Hoover,
dial 8318, before Wednesday noon,
and be excused.
In each ,case three of the five stu-
dents :are women. They do not in
either case take the ordinary number
of hours, but take enough to be
classed as students. Under-graduate

GOLF TOURNEY TO
BE HELD MAY 19
Class golf will run off its tourna I
ment 'May 19 with six people whose
scores qualify them to enter taking
part. This announcement was made
yesterday by Eleanor Treadwell,
'28Ed, W.A.A. manager of golf, upon
the last day of collection for the
preliminary scores.
Those whose scores were low en-
ough to qualify for the tournament
were, Geraldine Wilkinson '30, Nell-
ie Hoover '28, Ethel Crowe '28, Kath-
erine McMurray '31, Dorothy Lyons
'29, and Cynthia Hawkins '29.
Between now and May 19 anyone'
who is able to hand in a score of'
less than 140 for eighteen holesmay'
enter the tournament. All of the con-
testants will play at one time, pairs
being sent off at five minute inter-
vals, the starting-time being set as 8
o'clock Sunday morning, May 19. Af-,
ter eighteen holes have been play-1
ed, the lowest score will be the win-
ner of the tournament
The first plan for this {sealson's1
golf was an inter-class sort of com-,
petition, and it was only after it was,
discovered that skill was not equal-
ly divided among the four classes
that this plan was abandoned. Junior
and senior women seemed to excel
by far the underclass women. An
incentive for all women golfers this
yearswas an announcement from the
physical education office stating'
who made a score of less than 50 on
nine holes would be given an oppor-
tunity to play on a course in Detroit.

GLEE CLUB CONCERT
On Saturday, May 12, at 8 A -
chock, the University Girls' j
Glee club will give their annual 4
concert in Ann Arbor at thq Ma- j
sonic temple. The concert will
be followed by a dance at 9 o'-
jclock ,and single admission for j
both concert and dance will be j
( 50 cents. 1
An important neeting of sopho-
more women for Junior Girls' Play
elections will be held at 4:15\ o'clock
tomorrow in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
There will be a meeting of the W.
A. A. executive board at 6 o'clock to-
day at the Cozy Corner tea room. Ev-
erybody must be present, because
elections of the new board members
will be held.
Elective golfers may meet at 4 o'-
clock in Barbour gym today. Busses
and taxis will be there to take thuin
to the course.
Scores for intramural golf compe-
tition are to be handed in, at Barbour
gymnasium by tomorrow at the lat-
est. Further announcements regard-
ing this tournament will appear in
the Daily.

I

j TODAY'S GAMES
Freshmen vs. seniors; Jun-
iors vs. sophomores at 4:15 on
Palmer field. Spectators are wjl-
1 come.

and post-graduate work are bothi

I tacDiarmid s Candies

715 North University

Next to Arcade Theatre

Remember Your Mother on

. ... ........ o........... m .-u....o..u..................................................

Excellent Opportunity for Summer Work
Calling on executives selling a new visible card system
for recording securities. Good commission, training and
sales experience. Offers a permanent connection with
a real future.
K. G. Guhne, Shelby Hotel, Detroit
Appointments may he made for May 11 and 12. No interviews granted
unless arranged for before Friday evening.

Mothers Day-May 13
We Mail and Wrap All Parcel Post Orders

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Boxes of
Candy?

Have You Seen
Our Beautiful
Mother's Day

I-

-

C................n.................. ..................................................sN..n.. . P.,,.
i1 II

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Jung's Arch Braces
Relieve tired aching feet, correct fallen
arches and foot strain.
Complete Line of These Braces at Our
Store, $1.00 to $2.50
Eberbach & Son Co.
Established 1SV3
200-202 E. Liberty St.

Ann Arbor Dairy Pasteurized
Milk is a favorite everywhere
in Ann Arbor-and no won-
der, for it's rich and tasty
and absolutely pure!
THE ANN ARBOR DAIRY CO.
Dial 4101

er's, Johnston's and
toss Candies
N Ross hop
Nickels Arcade

I

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MAY FESTIVAL
Ann Arbor, May 16, 17, 18, 19

r

E hardest
thing to find

Ae..- ,-4

laud

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
Syracuse, ,N. Y.
Office of the Dean

-
7' '
.a .,.._

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r

in some -stores is
the easiest to find
here. We special-
ize in fashions that
are exclusive at
nrices that -are

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS
Harold .L. Butler, Dean
March 1, 1928.
Prof. Charles A. Sink,
University School of Music,,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Dear Prof. Sink:
Best congratulations up-)n the fine list o
artists for the feast of good music which you
will offer to Ann Arbor music lovers at your
May, Festival.
I wish I might be there to enjoy the pro-
grams with you. I hope you will have the
greatest success in the history of this fine mu-
sical enterprise.

S PEAK to the trainer,
the coach, the doctor,
or the physiology pro-.
fessor. They'll tell you
that there is a no more
healthful habit than
your daily two biscuits of

t

Shredded

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