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May 08, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1928.

THE MICHICAN DAILY

PREDICT HEAVY VOTING IN CAMPUS ELECTIONS TOM

ORRC

STUDENTS FROM E V E R Y COLLEGE ORATORICAL BODYT
WILL PARTICIPATE INE NOMINATES NINL
SPRING VO'TE I

1.7 A A %A YW V 1J£LU
Students from all schools and colleges in the University will as-
semble tomorrow at the various campus polls to vote in the annual spring
all-campus elections. Judging from the final count of the number of
registrations which were subscribed last Tuesday and Wednesday, the
balloting this year will be fully as heavy as that of the year previous.
T he official Student Council report places the registration total at some
3,500, approximately the same as in 1297.
The election this year, as on all previous occasions, will be held onej
lay only. The ballot boxes will be placed at places on the campus that
will be most convenient to the several schools and colleges. Each of

these units will be provided with
separate booths. The locations of
these will be as follows: the literary
students will vote on the diagonal,
in front of the library; business ad-
ministration students, physical edu-
cation students, education students,
pharmicists, forestry students, and all
graduate students, will use the booth
in Tappan hall; engineers and archi-
tects will utilize the boxes under the
engineer's arch; dental students will
vote at the School of Dentistry; medi-
cal students will cast their ballots in
the new medical
building; law stu-
dents will ballot at
the Law building.
Special Vote For
Medics
Special consider-
ation will be tend-
ered to the senior
medica.l students,
who will be absent
uin a body at the t
time of the elec-I
tion, due to someI
function of t he f
William class. These Stu-
Nissen, '29 dents will be af-!
forded a special election today. This
balloting will be conducted by Court-
land C. Smith, '28, president of the
Student Council, and Henry Grinnel,t
'28, chairman of the Student Council
committee in charge of the election.t
These votes will remain locked and<
untouched in the ballot boxes untilt
after the general election tomorrow.1
The ballot boxes will be open fort
voting from 9 o'clock in the morning
until 12:10 o'clock at noon. They will
reopen at 1 o'clock and continue un-
il 5 qgclock, when all booths will be
finally closed. . These booths will be
in the charge of Student Council mem-
bers, who will oversee and supervise
the voting insofar as checkng voters
with the registraon lists is con-
cerned.
No votes will be accepted from any
students who did not register for the
election last week. This rule was
made emphati at the time of registra-
tion and it will eestretly enforced at
the senior medic election today and
a the general election tomorrow. It
s also necessary for each voter to
cast his ballot at the booth assigned
to his school or college.
Race Close
T h e race tlis
year, due to the
number of organ-
izations that are
running but t w o
candidates for of-
fice, is intensified
considerably. T he
offices to be filled
include officers forI
the Student Coun-
cil, the Michigan
Union, the Orator _
ical Association,
the Board in Con- C. Ford I
tr Bo1 of Student Schott, '29 I
Publications, the Board in Control of
Athletics, 'and the Students Chris-
tion Association.
The offices for the Council include
the presidency, for which positions
there are two men running; three
senior representatives, and three
junior representatives. There areI
eight candidates for the three posi-
tions in each class. This is an all
men vote.
There are two candidates for the
presidency of the Union, and two for
the recording secretaryship; for the
various vice-presidencies each voter
will vote in his particular class only.
There will be six of these officets:
one for the literary students, one for
lawyers, one for medics, one for en-
gineers, one for dental students, and
one combined yice-president$ This
also will be an all men vote.
W Post Results
In the race for the presidency of
the Student Chris-
t'ia n association
there will be two
candidates. Only

students who ex-
press themselves
as being in favor
of the objectives of
t h e organization
are asked to poll in
this vote. It is
open to both men
and women.
T h e Oratorical
Association off ees
Cliesta' to be filled are the
Bennet, 9 p r e s idency, th e
vice-presidency, the secretary, and the
treasurer. This will be an entire cam-
pus vote.'
.The Board in .Control of Student
Publications has three positions to
be filled,;all of which are of equal
i ankinz. This. too. will be an entire

1
WHERE TO VOTE{
SLltIs:in front, of library.-.
I Bus. Ads.: Tappatt hall.-I
I Physical Eds.: Tappan hall. 1
I Graduate students: Tappan hale. .I
Pharmics: Tappan hall.
Foresters: Tappan hall.-
Engineers: Engineering arch.
Architects: Engineering arch.-
Dents: Dental building. d .
Medics: New Medical building. 1
Laws: Back of Law building.
Senior Medics; Special Election }
today.
Will Grant Special
Balloting For Today
Due to a trip to be taken by the
class tomorrow, the Senior class of1
the Medical school will open the cam-
pus elections today by holding thei
pant of the polling for campus of-
fices. The election, whiclh will be
confined exclusively to the senior me-
dies, will be under the charge of
Courtland Smith, '28, president of the
Student council, and Henry Grinnell,
'28, members of the elections commit-
tee.
While the vote will be completed
tonight, the ballot boxes will not bf
opened until tomorrow afternoon. a:
the conclusion of the general campusI
vote which is scheduled throughou
tomorrow morning and afternoon

Officers for the Oratorical Assoc-
iation, of which the nominees for
president are Robert Gessner '29, and
Lyle Eiserman, '28L, are to be chos-
en by a vote of the entire campus.
The other offices to be voted upon
and the nominees for these positions
are: for vice president, Lawrence
1 Walkiey, '30, and Harold Charter,
'30L; For secretary, Dorothy Lyons,
'29, and Margaret Arthur, '29; For
treasurer, Lawrence Hartwig '31,_,ari
Andeer, and John Webster '30.
Both Eiserman and Gessner have
been very active in this field ever
since their freshman years, and Ges-
sner is already a member of the Or-
atorical board. acting as chairm-an of
the publicity committee. Besides this
positon he has been a member of
the Adelphi House of Representa-
tives, the winner of the first honors
in the Black New T'estam-ent Orator-
ical contest in 1927, a member of
the 1929 J-Hop committee, and mera -
ber of the Daily staff for three
years. Opposing him, Eiserman has
been the past president of Alpha Nu"
the chairiran of the local contest
committee of oratory, a member of
Delta Sigma Rho, and the vice presi-
dent of the Oratorical association.
Of the candidates for the vice pres-
idency Lawrence Walkley is prom--
inent having been a member in the,
Adelphi House of Representatives, a
member of the Daily business staff,
of the Sophomore Prom- committee,
and of the Oratorical committee.
T WO RUNNING FOR
S. C. A. OFFIC
Voting for the president ci' th'
Student Christian Association shas
been narrowed down to the selection
of one of two candidates, Chester B.
Bennett, '29, and Martin Mol '30. The
position of president in this associa-
tion is an especially responsible onei
as that officer appoints his own offic-
ers and committee heada.I

i

I --" - - - - - - -- - - , -

COUNCILMEN IN
POLL TOMORROWi

KERN

AND CRISTY OPPOSE
EACH OTHER FOR
PRESIDENT

OFFICIAL BALLOT
All-Campus Election, Wednesday, May 9

INSTRUCTIONS :-Place a
the name of the candidate

DAILY CONDUCTS
LARGER ELECTION,
The poll conducted by The Daily
during the latter part of Ma.rch forj
presidential preferences resulted in af
total casting of well over 4,000 votes,
minus a few hundred faculty ballots.
This number exceeds by nearly a
thousand the total registration for
the forthcoming all-campus election.
This variance probably is due to the
more universial interest in national
ipolitics over local campus activities

NUMBER OF CANDIDATES FOR CHI1
OFFICES NARROWS AS
LISTS CLOSE
With the closing of the candidacy lists for the cam pus election
be held.tomorrow, the field for the chief officer in each of the :
lajor organizations. has narrowed itself down to two men. 'faking
consideration all of the men who are candidates for positions in the e
tion, records show that nearly every campus activity is represented,
that most of the men have had a wide experience in the ifferent or
izations in which they will contest for positions.
Chief among the lines of experience of the several candidates
their records in campus affairs, and more especially, in the fields w-

cross in the square (

) beforeI

for whom you wish to vote.'

Student Council
(Ali Men. Vote?
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
PAUL J. KERN
HARLAN P. CRISTY

Students' Christian
Association
(Entire Campus Vote)
PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)

BOTH ACTIVE ON CAMPUS
Only Six Out Of Sixteen Candidates
Will Be Chosen As Senior And
Junior Representatives
Three members from the Class of
'30, three new members from the
class of '29, and the president of the
student council will be elected to-
morrow. The Council consists of 1
men, including tee seniors that
were elected to the Council last year,
three new mem-
.bers. of that class,.
three from t h e
.*.*.°=."> ...,>sophomore class,
?: the managing edi-
tor of The Daily,
the student mem-
ber of the Board in
Control of Athlet-
rles, the president:
<;s of t h e Michigan
Union, and t h e
president - elect of
the Council.
Paul J. K e r n,
who has been quite
active on The Daily
ul '.1 and Union operasj
will be opposed by
Harlan P. Cristy, who has done much
work in dramatics and in the Union,
for president.
Kern was on The Michigan Daily,
1926--27-28, a night editor in 1927-28,t
Student Council reporter in 1927-28, ont
the Union opera publicity committee.1
"Front Page Stuff," in 1926-27, chair-t
man of the Union opera publicity com-i
mittee "The Same To You," 1927-281
treasurer of the Oratorical associa-t
tion, 1927-28, and winner of the all-
campus extemporaneous speaking con-
test, 1926.
Cristy wa's president of the class of1
'29 in 1926-27, a member of Unionl
committees in 1926 and 1927, in ther
cast of the Union opera, "Front PageI
Staff," in 1926-27, in the cast of the,
Union opera "'The Same To You," in
1927-28, a member of Mimes in 1927
and 1928, and a member of Comedys
club in 1927 and 1928.
Of <eight candidates for Senior Re-s
presentative and eight for Junior lep-c
resentatives to the Student Council,
three from each class will be chosen.i
Those running from the class of '29t
are: Mark A n - ,-
Brews, Durwin Al-}
gyer, Eugene East-t
erly, Paul Minsel, i
Raymond Wachter, t
Robertt Warren, |
Dwvid, W h ee Ie r
and Jameson Wil-«:,
liams,. Those nomi-
inated for Junior.
representatives are l
R o b e r t Dickey,
Ludwig Emde,.
Donald Koch, Wilt-
lard Lowry, Jen-
n i n g s McBride. Harla1n
Ernest Reif, ald P-risty, I 1
.John Rice. As onlythiee of these,
men as well as only three from the
Seniors will be elected, the voters are,
presented with a difficult task-that
of selecting the right men. All of the
men, however, have fine records of
past work and all are,apable of dis-
charging the duties of the offices for
which they are running.
Registration Report
Contains Names Of
About 3,500 Voters
Approximately 3500 students are
registered to vote in the all-campus
election, according to an announce-
ment made yesterday by Courtland C.
Smith, president of the student coun-
cil, and Henry S. Grinnell, '28, chair-
man of the Student Council Ele tions
Committee. About 2000 of those reg-
istered are enrolled in the College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts.
The number registered is approxi-
mately one-third of the entire stu-
dent body.

Last year the registration was
somewhat heavier than this year. At
that time m-ore than 300 more stu-
dents complied with the requirements
which made them eligible to vote.
Only about 2000 votes were actually
cast in the 1927 election, however. It
is expected that the actual vote will
be much heavier this year since the
interest in the election has contin-
ually increased.
Registration was held last Wednes-
day and Thursday under the general
direction of Henry S. Grinnell. Those
booths were kept open on both days
jbetween 9 o'clock in the morning and
4 o'clock in the afternoon and tvo

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in the political line. they are contesting for places. The
ANIHOVRFCTO IVNYTO COMPTE
Many Believe That Coolidge Will Run Nisseu And Schott Are Candidages
i Sufficient Dennand Is Made For Presidential
By Supporters Office
COOLIDGE IS LAST HOPE MEN TO VOTETOMORRW
WASHINGTON, May 7-There are Wednesday's all campus elections
many visible evidences that the group will find twenty men competing for
in the Republican party which is op- offices in the Michigan Union. Of that
posed to the nomination of Herbert number eight are to be elected. The
Hoover is preparing for a last grand total number of candidates seeking
effort to induce President Calvin Coo- Union positions this year excels that
lidge to accept a renomination. of a year ago by three, there being
Stating the situation differently, it seventeen in competition last year.
is now apparent that Mr. Coolidge is Running for the presidency of the
the last remaining hope of the anti- Union are William E. Nissen and C.
Hoover contingent, Charles Evans Ford Schott. Nissen began.-his work
Hughes, to whom the opponents of on the Union in 1926, when he .was
Mr. Hoover in the East, headed by made chairman of the freshman group.
Charles D. Hilles, of New York, and During the same year he served on
AndrewD W. Mellon, of Pennsylvania, the under class committee. The fol-
clung for several months, is admitted-.lowing year he'was made a member of
ly removed from consideration for the the Executive Council, given the as-
reason that it now is obvious that sistant chairmanship of the Rgeeption
even if he should withdraw his re- committee, and served as chirma~n of
fusal to be a candidate, he could not the Library committee. Since 'Jan-
be nominated. uary Nissen has been chairman .of the
Similarly Charles G. Dawes is con- Father's day committee, general chair-
ceded to be a blasted hope. The poor -an of the reception committee, and
showing Mr. Dawes made in the Ohio" again served as a member of the Exe-
and Massachusetts primaries marked eutive council. C. Ford Schott is the
his end as a presidential prospect in other candidate for the Union presi-
the eastern section of the country, ency. As a member of the staff of
from which he must needs draw a the. Union Schott has xeceived the
large support to secure the nomina- chairmanship of the Pubicity: commit-
lion. tee and has served as a member of
Coolidge The Last Hope the Executive council. Schott's other
Hence it is that the Hoover oppo- activities include membership to the
sition once more is back to Mr. Coo- COMedy club, member of the cast of
lidlge Is their sole remaining hope. the Michigan Union Opera and service
In the last few days the talk of re- as assistant Track Manager.
nominating the President has beenf Two ca dides are in the running
heard in many new quarters. For ex- for the oiie of Recording Sere
ample, Senator Curtis, Kansas, himself tary, Kenneth Schafer, and William
a presidential candidate, is conceding Spencer. Schafer has for two years
in private conversation that he per- been a member of the Tennis Team,
sonalliy has no hope of nomination and last year won his numeals in
and he invariably follows this with the that sport. He served both this y r r
assertion that the nominee; in his and last as Assistaayt RecordigSt.
opinion, will be Mr. Coolidge. cretary.
Mr. Curtis goes even farther, if he-
is quite sure his auditor will keep WILL itELECT ONE
the secret, by assertin; that he has STUDENT
had from the President's own lips T MEMBER
what he regards as virtual assurance FOR 1928 BOARD
that he would accept the nomination
if it was forced upon him. Mr. Cur- From a ballot of seven students, all

nominations for offices on the St
dent Council were made by t
regular nominating committee of t
present council; the nominations
.the offices on the Oratorical assoe!
tion and on the Student Christian a
sociation were made by the std.e
nominating committees of the resp
tive organizations; and in the Uni
races nomination by ptition ,w
allowed, when Ford Schott, '29,
tered by this method, and the r
were made by the nominations of I
governing board.
All of the periods for petitioni
have now expired,
however, and the
candidates a w a i t
t h e, elections t o-
morrow. Several
withdrawals have w
been made since
the first tickets
werm anmounced.
William Edwards,
'30, withdrew from
the race for Junior
representative o n
the Council. John
Ruswinckel, '2 9,
withdrew from the R. J.
race for presidency Messner, '29
of the Union after he had received
regular nomination. Frederick l
Witt, '29E, withdrew in the race t
Engineering vice-president of t
Union. Paul Minsel withdrew frc
two races: the board of Student Pu
lications and for the literary vic
presidency of the Union. Edw
Forbes also withdrew from the Boa
of Student Publication contest.
Following are the records in acti
ities of the various men, as submltt
by themselves:
ORATORI(AL ASSOCIATIONS
President .
Lyle Eiserman, '281-President
Alpha Nu and Phi Phi Sigma; Del
Sigma Rho member; vice-preside
of Qriatorical association, 1927-2
chairman of contest committee
oratory.
Robert J. Wessner, '29.-Member
Oratorical board; member and pre
dent of Adlphi debating society; fix
place i. bIlack New Testament ea
test in t1 27; member of 1929 J-H
comm'ytee; Michigan Daily staff f
thre(' years.
MICHIGAN UNION
President
I «1" anm INissen,'29-Union undercla
committee, 92
Assistant chairm
U"Union recepti
k=committee, cha
man of Union lit
a r y co mmitt
member of exec
t i e committE
1927; genera
chairman of rece
t i on departmej
chairman of Fat
er's day committe
1928.
0. Ford Schot
Lyle 29. - Union Pi
Elseruan '28 Ii city eommitte.
chairman member of Executive co
mittee; Union opera company; assi
ant, track manager.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL
!President
Paul J- Kern, '29.-The Michig
Daily staff, 1926-27-28; night edit
1927-28; Student council report'
1927-28; Union opera publicity co
mittee, "Front Page Stuff'' 192
chairman of Union opera pul llil
committee, 1927; treasurerof thei
torical association, 1927-28; win er
all-campus extemporaneous speakii
contest, 1926.
Hwaran P. Cristy, '29.-Class pre
dent, 1925-26; Union comnittees, 19
27; Michigan Union operas, 1925-
Comedy club; Mimes.
STT1U)ENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCU
TiON
Chester Bennett, '29 and Martin M
'30, are the two candidates for pre
dent of the Student
Christian associa -
Lion, and since that
organization d e -

sires to remain en
t i r e ly outside of
cam pu s political
connections b o t h
ot the candidates
h a v e agreed to
make no campaign
except among their
personal friends.
Both men have
been interested and
active in the work Martin Mol, ' 3
of the association
since their freshmen years on
campus, ,and the defeated candidate
agreement, will automatically to
the position of vice-president.
Students who vote for either one
these men on 'the ballots tomorr
minrn inn, nwill11 n rnnc t'i-hnm rlvysnq 1

[
[

1
]

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three)
[ J MARK ANDREWS
C ] DURWIN ALGYiER
[ ] EUGENE EASTERLY
[ J ROBERT WARREN
[ ) DAVID WHEELER
[ J PAUL MINSEi1L
[ ] RAYMOND WACHTER
JUNIOR RE.PRESENTATIVES
(Vote for Three),
[ ] LUDWIG EMDE
[ ] DONALD KOCH
[ ) WILLARD LOWRY
[ ) JENNINGS McBRIDE
[ ] ERNEST REIF
[ ) ROBERT SHORT
C ] JOHN RICE
[ ] ROBERT DICKEY
Michigan Union

[t
ii

]
I

CHESTER C. BENNETT
MARTIN MOL

Those who vote express themselves
as being in favor of the objectives of
the Student Christian Association.

Oratoricld
Association
(Enitire Campus Vote)
tPRESIDENT
ROBERT J. GESSNER
LYLE E. EISERMAN

[.
.

]I
]

VICE PRESIDENT

c
[c

]
J
3
I
I

LAWRENCE VALKLEY
HAROLD CHARTER

SECRETARY

II
]

(All Men Vote).
PRESI)ENT
(Vote for One)
C. FORD SCHOTT
WILLIAM E. NISSEN
RECORDING SECIRIETARY
(Vote for One)
KENNETh SCHAFER
WILLIAM SPENCER

[
[

DOROTHY LYONS
MARGARET ARTHUR

tis doesn't reveal just what Mr. Coo-
lidge is alleged to have said to him
with this regard, and he displays ex-
treme anxiety that the fact that he'
(Curtis) is peddling the word that
Coolidge will accept, shall not get
back to the President.
Senator David A. Reed, of Pennsyl-
vania, is another whose prediction
that Coolidge will be nominated is
given weight, particularly by those
persons who are anxious to believe
this prediction. Hie is recognized as
a henchman of Secretary Mellon. More
than that, Mr. Reed continues to as-
sert that he personally favors Hoov-
er. It is his close association with
Mr. Mellon, who is credited with con-
trolling most of the 79 as yet un-
disposed of delegates from Pennsyl-
vania, that causes Senator Reed's
words to be listened to.
FACTION IN TEXAS
PRIMARY FAVORED
TO TAKEVICTORY
(By Associated Press)
DALLAS, Texas, May 7- Texas
"bone dry" Democrats have emerged
from the opening skirmish with other
factions of the party, strongly favor-
-ed to win their campaign for a dele-
gation to the national convention un-
instructed for or against any presi-:
iential candidate.
After a drive led by the youthful
Gov. Dan Moody, the dry faction Sat-
urday demonstrated its strength in
precinct conventions by obtaining
control of so large a majority of
delegates in 71 of the 253
counties, that leaders of opposing
factions made little effort to obtain
.omplete returns. The Moody forces
demanded a delegation uninstructed
for presidential candidates, but in-
structed to work for a dry plank in
the national party platform, and for
-t dry nominee.
Returns considered representative
from the 3,000 odd precincts showed
1,481 delegates uninstructed and 1,234
instructed for a dry plank. Gov. Alfred
E. Smith, of New York, and Jesse H.
Jones, 1-ouston publisher and Djemo-
cratic national treasurer, led in in-
structed delegates. The incomplete
returns gave Smith 326, Jones 93 and

TREASURER

C
I-

]
I

AW RENCE HARTWIG
JARL ANDEER
JOHN WEBSTER

former prominent workers on campus
publications, three men will be select-
ed tomorrow at the annual spring
electionfi to fill the student positions
on the Board in Control of Student
Publications.
This board composed of seven mem-
bers, four of whom are University
faultymen, has supervision of the
three leading publications on the.
campus. The Michigan Daily, the
Michiganensian, and the Gargoyle. It
is this board that selects the manag-
ing editors -and business managers
each spring.
All of the seven students in the
race were nominated by the present
board, at a recent meeting. Three
others, nominatedat that time, have
withdrawn from the race.
One student on the existing board is
seeking re-election. Cassam Wilson,
'2S, has been a member of the board
for the past year. During 1926-27 he
was a" night editor of The Michigan
Daily. He will return next fall as a
student in the Law school.- Other can-
didates are.
Ellis Merry, '28, editor of The Mich-
igan Daily and a 'senior member of
the student council for the past year.
He will, return next year to enter the
Law school.'
Thomas L. Yates, '29E, who during
the year has been sales and distri-
bution manager of the Michiganensian.
William C. .pnsch, '28, busines's
manager of The Michigan Daily for
this year. le, too, will enter the Law
school in the fall.
C 0rge Ahn, '28, circulation man-
ager of The Michigan Daily for thip
year.
Charles Suic 28, organizations
manager of the Michiganensiuan dur-
ing the present year.
Howard Kenyon, 28, who edited the
feature department of the 1928 Mich-
igjanensian.

Ii

1
]

LITERARY VICE PRES.
(Vote only for one and only .i your)
department)
' ] RALPH POPP
[ ] CHARLES WIYTE
[ ) RICHARD HELMS
C0BINED VICE PRES.
[ JI hERBERT HUNTER
[ ] ROLAND DAHL
[ } HENRY BALGOOYEN
LAW VICE PRES.
{ ] DAVID VOKES
[ ] ALFRED BOWMAN
ENGINEERING VICE PRES.
r 1 TAITT T?~ TTAT.T

Board in Control o
Publications
(Entire (alipus Vote)
(Vote for Three)

I
I
I
I
]I

ELLIS MERRY
CASSAM WILSON
GEORGE AHN
WILLIAM PUSCII
THOMAS YATES
CHARLES SPICER
HOWARD KENYON
PDWIN FO-RBES

is host to the national party conven-
tion.
Announcements from Gov. Moody
and Jones that they would not be
candidates for the presidential nom-
ination, and the withdrawal of Senator
Nalsh, left Gov. Smith's supporters
virtually alone in campaign for an in-
structed delegation at the county con -
ventions tomorrow. The state conven-
tion will be held at Beaumont, Mafy 22.

I

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