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May 06, 1928 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-06

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Y 6, 1928.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SELF GOVERNMENT IN
COLLEGES COMPARED
BY PRESIDENT

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SPRING FORMALS AND TEAS
FEATURE SOCIETY OF WEEK

ANNOUNCE FRESHMAN>
PAGENT EHERSA~i ______ DailyB

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CONFERENCE 1DELEGATES
SYSTEM AT M~ICHIGAN
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FIND

MISS NUTTGIVES REPORT
Says Campus Needs Consciousness Of
Good Machinery To Make
Government Complete
That the organization for student
self-government among women at
Michigan is at least the equal of that!
in any other college in the middle
west, is the conclusion of Betty Nutt,
'28, and Mary White, '29, who were
Michigan's delegates to the conference
of the Mid-Western Intercollegiate As-
sociation of Women's Self-Government
held from April 18-21 at Carleton Col-
lege, Northfield, Minnesota.
This four-day conference included
reports on women's self-government,]
and round-table discussions based on
the questions raised in these reports..
Miss Nutt's report of the Women's
league at Michigan summarized the I
work of women's self-government on
a large university campus, while an
address by Sally Boudinot of Grin-
nell college explained the same ac-
tivities. as they are conducted at a
small college.
Point System Stressed {
The Michigan delegates feel that
they took to the conference more thn
they carried away from it, because they
found that practically every innova-
tion or suggestion discussed at North-
field had aldeady been tried at Mich-
igan. The point system, for instance,
which formed part of the conference
discussion, has been operative at
Michigan for some time.
The, machinery of self-government
at the University is theoretically per-
feet, Miss Nutt declared in her report.
However, the great problem is to find
some means sof arousing the campus.
to a realization of this government.
Without' this consciousness, the self-
government cannot be complete, she
believes.
Sizes Of Houses Cause Difficulty
Another difficulty at Michigan which
Miss Nutt pointed out is the "tre-
mendous divergence between the size
of the houses." . One system of self-
government has, here, to cover houses
ranging from 4 to 119 members. Thi
necessitates very broad rules.
Miss Nutt outlined the organization
of the Women's league, explaining how
it is divided into executive, legisla-
tive, and judicial branches-that is,
the board of directors, board ef re-~
presentatives, and judiciary council.
jJudiciary Not Disciplinary
In, commenting on the judiciary
council, Miss Nutt observes that its
aim is not disciplinary, but rather to
further understanding, promote coop-
eration; and help the individual girl.
The most commendable part of the
work of the council is, she believes,
that they have been able to assume a
helping attitude with such great suc-
cess that the girls do not go away in
an unfriendly frame of mind to either
the council or the Advisers of Wo-
men.
Miss Nutt's report also included a
discussion of the work of the world
fellowship committee of the league,
and a survey of the activities of Beta
Kappa Rho, the society for women
who are doing part-time work.
WNEBRASKA-The Home Econom-
ics girls will operate a novel tea
room, "The Tulip Inn." at the tenth
annual Farmers' Fair, May 5. All
the work in the tea room is planned
and done by girls from the depart-
ment.

The Betsy Barbour house spring
formal given Friday night was at-
tended by about 50 couples. The
guests danced under a sky of vari-
colored balloon's, whicly constituted
a unique note in the decorations.
The women of Betsy Barbour house
were hostesses to .their neighbors
from Helen Newberry at a tea dance
yesterday afternoon. Miss Mary
Lytle, social director of the dormitory,
and Dorothy Swartout, '28, house
president, poured.
The chairmen of the Junior Girls'.
play committees are dinner guests at
Helen Newberry residence today.
May birthdays of Helen Newberry
women were celebrated at .a birthday
dinner Tuesday night.
Miss Mary Jarvis, assistant director
of Helen Newberry residence, has had
her mother as a guest for the past
week.
Phi Sigma Sigma will observe Par-
ents' day with a bridge and tea in
honor of the mothers of the members.
Theta Phi Alpha gave a Founder's
day banquet Saturday, May 5. Miss
Ruth Brady and Mrs. Mildred Connel-
ly, alumni from Detroit, are guests at
the chapter house. May 12 and 13
Theta Phi Alpha is giving a Mother's
day house-party which will in-clude
several teas and dinners, and a
theater party at the Mimes playhouse.
Pi Beta Phi is giving a faculty din-
ner Wednesday evening. Mrs. Louis,
Vincenti, of California, is visiting her
daughter at the chapter house.
Pi Gamma Mu announce the pledg-
ing of the following: Freda McMil-
lan, '30; Allie Backus, '29; Winifred
Ford,,'29; Hazel Spedding, grad.; and
Dorothy Graham, '29. The chapter is
giving a formal patroness' dinner
Wednesday, May 16, and a Mother's
day tea Sunday afternoon.
Kappa Alpha Theta will celebrate
next Friday with their Spring formal
in the form of a dinner dance. Mrs.
Louis Bredvold and Dr. and Mrs. El-
rod will be honored guests.
Kappa Delta announces the engage-
ment of an alumna, Marion Kubik, '27,
to Carl Huber, Alpha Sigma Phi, who
is graduating from the medical school
this year.
Alpha Chi Omega is hostess' at a
faculty tea today.
Alpha Gamma Delta announces the
engagement of Ruth Becker, '28,
Grand Rapids, to Rolland Lyons, '27,
Ann Arbor. Alpha Gamma Delta gave
a dinner Thursday evening in honor
of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ford. The
other guests were Mr. and Mrs. Cur-
tis and Mr. and Mrs. Julio Del Toro.
The juniors of the sorority will en-
tertain the seniors at a tea this after-
noon.
Delta Omicron, national musical;
sorority, announces the pledging of
Harriet BrittonM, of Britton,
Mich., Ruth Weiler, S.M., of Detroit,
and Ruth Wells, S.M., of Ann Arbor.
Delta Zeta gave their spring formal
dance Friday night at the Union. The

patrons and patronesses were Miss
Bernice Hannan, Mrs. Bernice Clous-
er, Miss Nora Crane Hunt, Mr. and
Mrs. J. C. Brier, and Prof. and Mrs.
L. J. Rouse.
The sorority has also given two
rushing parties this week; the first
one was a dinner, Wednesday night
and the other a luncheon on Saturday
noon.
Kappa Kappa Gamma will enter-
tain at a formal dinner Tuesday.
Coach and Mrs. Fielding Yost, Dean
and Mrs. Joseph Bursley, Dean and
Mrs. Henry M. Bates, and Dean and
Mrs. Allan S. Whitney will be num-
bered among the guests.
Kappa Kappa Gamma announces the
initiation of Mary A. Stewart, '28, and
Louise Ratcliff.
Alphi Phi seniors were invited to
the kitchen shower given by Vera
Wallington, a patroness, in honor of
Miss Alice Kellogg. House guests for
the week end were Virginia Gies, and
Dorothy Clifford.
A rushing party wa's held at the
Chi Omega house last Wednesday
night. Thursday night, a bridge
party was given. The house guest
for the week end was Miss Margaret
Milnes of Coldwater.
Active members of Zeta Tau Alpha
were entertained Saturday afternoon
by the patronesses at the home of
Mrs. Erwin Dickenson. The pledges
entertained the actives at a tea
Wednesday afternoon. The chapter is
giving a Mother's day house-party
May 12 and 13, at which a formal din-
ner and theater party Saturday night
will be the main event.
Members of Sigma Kappa will be en-
tertained at an informal dance at the1
Maple-ridge country club of Detroit.
A faculty dinner will be given Thurs-
day night, and a Mother's day tea on
Sunday afternoon.
'Teelegraphic Meet Is
Planned With Illinois
That a telegraphic track meet be-
tween Michigan and Illinois is being
contemplated was the statement of
Rhoda Tuthill, '28Ed., W.A.A. manager
of track, yesterday. If plans for the
meet materialize, it will probably
come off abbut May 26.
M Whether or not this inter-collegiate
competition will be possible for Michi-
gan depends entirely, Miss Tuthill de-
clared, upon the numbers and skill of
the track material. All the coopera-
tion forthc mnng will be welcomed,
and 'is essential if the present season
in track and field is to be enlivened by,
a meet with another school.
Practice hours for the week will be
unchanged, 4 until 5o'clock on Mon-
day and Wednesday.

Entre Cast Will Meet On Saturday;
'Practices Will Be Final,
Says Miss Johnson
WILL BE GIVEN MAY 15
Final rehearsals of the Freshman
pageant dances will take place this
week, according to a schedule an-
nounced by Miss Ione Johnson, of
the physical 'educati'on depaPtment.
The practices are arranged as fol-
lows:
Sun dance: at 2:10 o'clock on Mon-,
day, Wednesday, and Friday. The.
members of this group are: Wilson,j
Kreye, Kelsey, Cheever, and Endlich.;
Twilight: at 2:10 on Tuesday and
Thursday. Menmbers: Michael, Rayen,
Ellis, Goldberg, Cossar, and Sym-
mons.
Flowers: at 5:10 on Monday and
Friday. Members: Tossy, Lawton,
Fitchel, Morin, Edington, Kelsey, and
Hosic.
Shadow: at 5:10 on Monday and
Friday. Menibers, Evans, Schneeberg-
er, Eberle, Krueger, Wilcox, Domine,
Ellis, VanTuyl and Reed.
Fruit: at 4:10 on Tuesday and!
Thursday. Members: Baeslack, Bar-
rows, Goodman, Stout, McCauley,
Behymer, and Fosler.
Garlands: at 4:10 on Monday and}
Friday. Members: Gim'nty, Howard, I
Jahr, Goodwin, Boehmer, and Hunt.
River: at 5:10 on ;Tuesday ;and;
Thursday. Members: Bliman, Con ill,
Cooke, Strohmeyer, Taylor, Khin,
Cohen, Hosic, Evans, and Robinson.
Autumn: at 3:10 on Tuesday and
Thursday. Members: Frandsen, Rud-
isell, Taylor, Wertel, and Cornell.
At 5:10 o'clock on Tuesday and
Thursday the following women will
meet for rehearsal: Durand, Mandel-
ker, Maslen, Clifford, Howard, Hunt,
Symons, Lally, Boehmer, Shafer,
Yearnd, Braun, Shafer, Locke, Smith,
and Wellstead.
The entire cast of the pageant are
to meet at 2 o'clock on Saturday. T'his
meeting is very important. All mem-
bers of the cast are asked to watch
the bulletin in Barbour gymnasium
for changes in the time of rehearsals.
In order to raise money for the
building of a Y.W.C.A. house, the'
University of California women stu-
dents are planning a circus. The
performances will be farcial in char-
acter, satirizing commercial enter-
prizes.

(Editor's Note-This is the fourth
of a series of articles based on the
athletic conference of middle-western
colleges which took place at Ohio
State University April 27, 28, and 29.)
Miss Rose Bozeck, national champ-
ion among women divers and at pre-
sent in training for the Olympics to
be held in Amsterdam, this summer,
is a freshman at Ohio State Univers-
ity. Charactetistically frank and
naive was her story of her first ap-
pearance in the world of sport. "On-
ly two weeks before the national com-
petition was to take place in Detroit
my trainer asked me to enter it. That
meant that I had to first learn how
to dive from a high board, but I was
willing. I came in fourth but all
black and blue."
A brief review of Miss Bozeck's
progress in the world of aquatic
sports reads like a story book. Ap-
parently she seta out to rise one place
toward the championship each year.
In 1916, the next year after she had
taken fourth place at Detroit, she
ranked third in Philadelphia. About
this time, she received a fairly large
piece of£encouragement by taking first
place at Detroit in a contest forE
junior divers who held no champion-
ship titles. She nearly upset her ree-
ord in 1927, however, at Buffalo,I
when she missed the championship
title by merely elevn hundredths of
a point. This winter, due to win first
place as well as being in Buffalo,
which seemed to be her lucky city,
she attained he ultimate goal.
"I first had a great desire to know
how to dive when I was watching a
girl diver in Cleveland." Miss Bozeck
CORNELL UNIVERSITY HAS
WOMEN'SFENCING TEAM
Cornell university ha's developed a
'team of women fenfcers that 'has
proved itself of high mettle. Their
latest achievement was a match held
with the New York Women's Fencing
club, April 25. One member was the
national champion. in 1924, and also
runner-up in the 1928 nationals; an-
other placed third in this year's na-
tional contests.
The Cornell team has had a number
of worthy opponents, one has held the
O'Connor cup for the last two years
and several others have been run-
ners-up in various inter-state match-
es.

represents the Cleveland Athletic
Club. "That was three years ago. I
learned how to swim only six years
ago. If my diving deserves any credit
at all, it should go to my teacher, Mr.
Larry Peterson of the Central Y. M.
C. A. in Cleveland. Without his In-
spiratlon,, nationafl tournaments woukO;
always have been way out of my ele-
ment."
Critics say that Miss Bozeck's rep-
ertore of difficult dives' is quite unus-
uaL the ten foot board'i q her specialty.
Among them are the back-jack with
one and one-half somersault, full
twist, full gainor, one and one-hatf
gainor, back one and one-half som-
jfrsaul 4nd twb somersaults for-
ward. Helen Meany of New York,
and Dorothy Payton from California,
as well as a large number from the
Middle-west, will also make strong
bids for the Olympics at the try-outs
in New York City" on June 30.
"I am interested !enough In4 the
"Olympic games," declared Miss Boz-
eck, "to sincerely hope that national'
relationships will improve as time
goes on. And I think that they will
grow better, rather than worse, be-
cause educating for sportsnmanship
has not as yet been very complete. It
is possible that they will improve
this year by being in Holland rather
than in one of the larger countries."

NATIONAL WOMEN'S DIVING CHAMPION,
ROSE BOZECK, TELLS OF HER CAREER

GLEE CLUB WILL SI?
HERE NEXT 'SATURDi
On Saturday night, May 12, at
o'clock the University Girls' Glee 6c
will give its annual concert at
Masonic temple in Ann Arbor. ]
several years it has been a tradit
for the Glee club to give at least o
concert here, and each concert 1
usually been followed by a dani
This year the usual custom will
carried ,out.
The program for the concert i
be announced later in the week. T
Glee club has been working all ye
and have given an out of town ,cone
in Battle Creek, so they are well I
pared for an appearance.
At 9 o'clock, following the conc
dancing will begin, and Fred Biglo
orchestra has been engaged for
evening. Single admission for W
concert and dance will be 50 cents
MUSICIANS SHOULD STU
IN AMERICA,_SAYS SINGI
it is no longer necessary to
training for a musical career
Europe, says Miss Florence Aust
noted dramatic soprano. There
miany splendid teachers in this co
try. Operatic experience may be
tained more easily abroad now,
with the development of more or
companies In the United States e
that will be unnecessary. A sin
can keep in good physical condit
by playing tennis and walking, geti
at least seven hours sleep, and avi
ing smoking and the use of alcohl

EXTRA MAY SPECIAL
LE MUR PERMANENT, ORIGINAL MARCEL WAVE 150
SERVICE FREE
SPECIAL-MON., TUES., WED-SHAMPOO and MARCELL....$1.00
Latest Style Finger Waving-Man Operator
KAY'S TONSORIAL AND BEAUTY SHOPPE
713 Packard Dial 7240
A Test of Merrick Heirloom
Handmade Chinese Rugs
On the Pavement at "Quarry's'
Corner of State and North University

. ._

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Is a Merrick Rug

LaneHall Tav(

The Finest of Wholesome Foods

Sunday Chicken Dinner

" " - -

Breakfast 7:10-10 A. M.

ern f
. .75C a
. .40CI
. . 50C~

M. E. FREEMAN,
Of the
National Beauty School
and
Expert in Ladies' Hair Cutting
Finger Waving-The Hollywood Wave-Nestle Circuline
Will Be at My Shop All Day Tuesday and
Wednesday, May 8 and 9
STODDARD HAIR SHOP
Phone 21212 Make Appointments Early

Until After the May Festival

The beautiful rug on display in the window will be given to
the person estimating nearest to the number who walk over
the rug during this time.
PERMANENT DISPLAY-928 CHURCH ST.

'To Be Exposed to Sun and Rain from
8 to 6 All Day Each. Day

Lunch (11:30-1:00)
Dinner (5:00-7:00)

. . . .

. .
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Phone 3155

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Pil I i i11111111111

New Management
Mrs. Anna Kalmbach

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MAY FESTIVAL
Ann Arbor, May 16, 17, 18, 19

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President's Office
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF MUSICIANS
OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

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Affiliated with
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Jos. N. Weber
1440 Broadway

New York, N. Y., March 17, 1928.

Mr. Charles A. Sink,
University School of Music,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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My dear Mr. Sink:-
Thanking you for the prospectus of your 1928
May Festival, beg to say that the pretentious program
prepared for the Ann Arbor University Musical So-
ciety May Festival, and the superb array' of vocal and
instrumental talent selected for the rendition thereof,
merits the highest commendation.
The value ofd su'ch an event in the sphere of edu-
cational refinement and its potents in promoting a
higher appreciation of music as an art, cannot be
over-estimated, and therefore deserves whole-hearted
support. Permit me to 'exten'l my heartiest good
wishes for the success of the Festival.

CLUB FROCKS
$19.75an $ .75
~ and
Here are just the frocks you'll want for wear at
the country club. Frocks of practical mode yet
with more than a hint of frivolity in their swagger
lines. Prints are the rule-but solid colors are well
represented. Moderate prices prevail.

Sincerely yorrs.I

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