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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 06, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY MA

_. . a_ _ . Y __..

i1 ; V

t

Published every morning except Monday
rg the Unr yar by th Board in
ntrol of Student Publication.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
sociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
led to the use for republication of all news
spatches- credited to it or not otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news pub
led herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
postage granted by Third Assistant Post
aster General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
Office's: Ann Aibor Press Building, May-
rd Street.
Phones:tEditorial, 4925; Business 2124.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING' EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
itor................. .Ellis 11. Merry
itor Michigan Weekly.Ch.rle- E. Behymer
ews Editor................Philip C. Brooks
ty jhuoi ,,-...,......Courtiana C. Smith
omen's. Editor........... Marian L. Welles
orts Editor............Herbert F. Vedder
eater, Books and Music.Vincet C. Wall, Jr.
sistant City Editor....Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
obert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
iul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
ether~ Anderson Sally Knox
argaret Arthur T nn H. Maloney'
[ex A. ochnowsk Marion McDonald
an Campbell Charles S. Monroe
tssie Church Catherine Price
anchard W. Cleland Harold L. Passmar
larence N.rEdelsor Morris W. Quinn
largaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
alborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
arorie Follmer Eleanor Scribner
mes B. Freemar Corinne Schwarz
,obert J. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
laine E. Cruber Howard F.'Simon
lice Hagelslaw George E. Simons
seph 13. Howell Rowena Stillman
Wallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
harles R. Kaufman George Tilley
illiam F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
awrence R. Kleir Edward L. Warner, Jr.
,nald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
ok G Lait. it Joseph Zwerdlirg
RUSINESS STAFF
'elephone 21214
IUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
40itnrl Manager. George H Annable, Jr.
dvertising. Richard A Mey.
dverting.. .... Edward L. Hulse
:vertising..........John W. Ruswinckel
couts.........Raymond Wachter
rculation .... George B. Ahn, Jr.
ublication....... .... .Harvey Talcott
Assistants
erge Bradley Ray Hofelich
arie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
mes Carpenter James Jordan
arles K. Correll Marion Kerr
arbara Cromell Thales N. 'Lenington
ary Dively Catherine McKinven
ssie V. Egeland .Dorothy Lyons
na Felker . Alex. K. Scherer
atherine Frohne George Spater
ouglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
eatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
len Gross Lawrence Walkley
Jr Hammer llannah Wallen
rl W. Hammer'
SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1928.
'ight Editor-GEORGE E. SIMONS
THE MICHIGAN WEEKLY
Existing almost unobtrusively as far
the campus was concerned for the
itire period of the past year, and
ill filling a very vital need very ex-
llently-that has been the history
the first year of the Michigan
eekly, which is at present conclud-
g. Under the editorship of Charles
ehymer, '28, the publication has been
pt on a general high plane, and with
subscription list of close to 1,000
is quite probable that the venture
ill prove to be successful or nearly
Lccessful financially.
Established ,originally for the pur-
se of .serving the parents of .Uni-
rsity students with the most im-
rtant news events of the week re-
inted from The Daily, the expand-
g functions of the paper have made
extremely desirable that an enlarg-
Sfield be opened for the publication
eien to the extent of providing a
write 'taff which can condense and
mmarize the week's events in story
rm to obviate the necessity of taking

e items just as they appear in The
tily. The advantage of this system
obvious.
Under the editorship of Stewart
poker, '29, and largely through his
'orts, this change haspbeen brought
out for the coming year. The Board
Control of Student Publications has
reed to provide the financial back-
g for the scheme, .and the result
ould be, combined with the capa-
e editing which the publication will
ceive through the coming year, a
sekly vastly improved in every re-

phase only of complete success for
the Michigan Weekly can possibly be
lacking for next year-and that is a
phase which the student body itself
can look to-the problem of securing
sufficient subscriptions to the publica-
Lion to sustain it on a paying basis.
If The Michigan Daily is a virtual
necessity to student life on the Uni-
versity campus, then there is no rea-
son why the Weekly, through the
years, should not attain a similar
position among the parents of stu-
dents. Dreams and visions of com-
bining it with the Michigan Alumnus
seem not so remote when accomplish-
ments such as the present one are re-
ported, and the day seems not far
distant when the Weekly will become
as much a byword to Michigan stu-
dents as the Michiganensian, the Gar-
goyle, and The Michigan Daily it-
self.
UNSUNG HEROES
Yesterday afternoon, an unsung hero
of the Spanish-American War was
buried at Grand Rapids. William A.
Dean, a veteran of the war, was one
of six American soldiers who risked
their lives in order that others might
be saved, not from death on the bat-
tle fields, but from a slow terrible
death from yellow fever..
During the Spanish-American War,
most of which was fought under the
burning sun and in, mosquito infested
marshes of tropical islands, the med-
ical corps of the United States Army
faced the problem of Yellow Fever
among the soldiers. Thousands of
soldiers were taken by this dread dis-
ease. Dean with five other men al-
lowed themselves to be stung by mos-
quitoes believed to be carrying the
fever and then submitted to experi-
mental treatment by army physicians
in order that their fellow sqldiers
might be saved. The other five suc-
cumbed during their confinement to
the hospital.
How many of our men and women
are doing things of this type contin-
ually, wholly for the good of thous-
ands of people whom they have never
seen and who will probably never
hear of their benefactors. Hundreds.
have sacrificed their lives for our
comfort and welfare. It is not too
much for us to pause now and then
in our activities to offer a word of
praise to these unsung heroes.
The Daily Princetonian had an in-
terview which they seemed to think
was big news. The gist of it was that
universities are stifling to student
thought. We had noticed that long
ago.

TASTED ROLL
DiON'T SEL
YOUR
*==== TOTE
AT LEAST NOT too cheaply; and
don't forget Jeb for president of the
Union. Write his name in on the
ballot and he promises to be both
Shot and Missin' after the election.
* * *
ROLLS ALSO ANNOUNCES the can-
didacy of Benjamin Bolt for president
of the Oratorical board. He also prom-
ises to do all that Jeb will do with
the presidency of the Union.
* * *
BOLT TURNED DOWN a chance to
run for the presidency of the S. C. A.,
saying that it would be secrehigious.
, , *

THEATER,
OOKS
M UK S I C

THE HEIGHT OF something+
other would be for us, Three Star,
run for the presidency of the W.
T. U.
WE'RE SATISFIED, THOUGH

or
to
C.

' ' rc
. pp'F1CE
JoEf
1
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CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request: Letters pub-
lished should not be construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.

- '
TO CORRECT A POSSIBLE
0SUNDERSTANDING
To the editor:
I regret that an editorial in your
paper recently written in a spirit of
praise of the University of Michigan
Greenland Expeditions, should have
made reference disparagingly to the
Byrd Antarctic Expedition. I feel that
the opportunities for large scientific
results in connection with Byrd's pro-
posed expedition are very great and
are quite likely to be'realized. While
not a scientist, Commander Byrd has
the scientific spirit of inquiry and is
wisely depending upon men of special
training in laying out his plans. I am,
in fact, myself acting in an advisory
capacity. Moreover, Professor Gould
with both training and experience in
Arctic work, was the first man chosen
for his scientific personnel, and Byrd
is referring scientific matters of large
importance to him for decision.
W. H. Hobbs
(Editor's Note: The editorial to
which Professor Hobbs refers was.
in no way meant to cast reflections
on the Byrd antarctic expedition. The
Daily has repeatedly lauded Command-
er Byrd for his contributions to avia-
tion and exploration; and the compar-
ison between the Byrd expedition and
the Hobbs project was employed only'
for the purpose of casting in an ex-
tremely favorable light the efforts of
Professor, Hobbs.)
* * *

L, U'J4
REMEMBER, READERS, BACK our
ticket to the limit. Write the names
in, and remember Ben's campaign slo-
gan, "DON'T BOLT THE TICKET!"
REED SAYS A FEW THINGS
SENATOR JIM, HONORED by Sig-
ma Deta Chi last year with a huge
brass cuspidor which bore the legend
"-recognizing the capacity of the
Senator from Missouri," seems to be
slightly peeved with the gentleman
from Montana.
*,*
INVESTIGATOR WALSH, TO use
Reed's words, "gave up the campaign
because he lost a skirmish." We have
an idea that the only reason Reed
is angry is that Walsh withdrew in
favor of Smith. Of course we may
be all wet, as usual. /
* * *
THE SPHINX GLOWERS
THE SPHINX OF the White House
threatens to say something almost
any minute now. He is going to veto
the two major measures before Con-
gress at the present time.
* * *
AT THAT IT would be too bad if
the present administration settled the
problems, because there wouldn't be
anything to fight about.
* * *
NATHAN MAKES A CRACK
GEORGE JEAN NATHAN, Music
and Drama's only rival, has stated
that college stifles thought. Perhaps
Georgie means that professors put
students to sleep and anyone knows
that you can't think while sleeping.
THEN, OF COURSE, there Is the
other "case" generally supposed to oc-
cupy the time of most students. Since
this is not Heidelberg we can't think
while we are "under."
RUN, BROTHERS, RUN
"COLD-CASH" PYLE'S pavement
pounders, commonly called cross-con-
tinent competitors, will arrive in Chi-
cago today. All the gangsters will
be out to meet their friends.
THEY WERE SUPPOSE, to arrive
yesterday, but their course ran past
the three Illinois reformatories, and
they had to detour to avoid difficulties.
At that they went through Kankakee,
but the manager had to detour there.
THE INSIGNIA
_ 'o
Above is a Rolls photograph of the
coat of arms of Pete Gavuzzi, the lead-
er of the pack. His dogs are certain-
ly barking after some 2,000 miles.
* * *
TUESDAY WE'LL HAVE another
Swingout. All the grocers in town
are haunting the various alleys in an'
effort to accumulate enough to supply
the lawyers and engineers as they
make their respective parades before
the Engi'ne school and Law club re-
viewing stands. Now that Mortimer
E. is gone it wouldn't be so bad if
a couple of the rival deans person-
ally led the march.
* * *
PERHAPS THE LAWYERS will I

I HEAR AMERICA SINGING
A review, by Robert Gessner
Ann Arbor will be the host to some
four or five thousand boys and girls
on May 10 and 11, when the final
competitions in the Michigan State
Music Contests, which have been tak-
ing place in various districts of the
State during the past few weeks, will
be held.
These contests are the result of that
fomentation of opinion among educa-
tors, and others who though that
America ought to be cultured, which
occured when you and I were chil-
dren, and which was increased in in-
tensity when powers at Washington
found that men fought better when
they sang. This catching of the young
and getting them to sing the works
of French, German, and other Euro-
pean composers is supposed to plant
a love for "good music in their
breasts which will flower in the adult-
hood of those so treated. But, barring
the fact that children rarely if ever
sing-only croon, teaching them mu-
sic that has no roots in their daily
life is futile, and as soon as they be-
come old enough, the superior popu-
lar vitality of jazz claims them-and
they regard those things they learned
in school as. something to be brought
out for company. The majority of the
people thus engaged have been been
so seduced by the melodic suavity of
the foreign composers, and those p
their tradition, that they have failed
to hear many of the native wood notes
and have thus been unable to do, ex-
cept in exceptional cases where the
fire was already there, what they have
set out to do. They forget that, for
educated people, a love for songs and
.
singing, which is really what they are
trying to inculcate, is the result of the
whole cycle of education and sophisti-
cation, and that only those who have
experienced the heroic, the romantic,
and the morbid can sing and rejoin
with the same ease and sincerity as
those more naive people, who rejoice
because nature moves them.
The following is the first program to
be presented by the thousands:
Beautiful Saviour ...... Christiansen
Home of Liberty
-Arranged by Schindler
Silver Swan ..............Gibbons
Massed Mixed Chorus (all classes)
"Grieg Suite"
-Arranged by Rebman-Clark
Orchestras Class C
Loch Lomond ..... Vaughn Williams
Peaceful Night .............. German
Where'er You Walk ..Handel-Spross
Boys Glee Clubs
Short Talk, "Colors and Music"
-Fielding H. Yost, Director. of
Intercollegiate Athletics, Uni-
versity of Michigan.
Serenade ................ R. Strauss
Destiny .......................Iluhn
Sumer Wind...............McDowell
Girls Glee Clubs
Farandole .................... Bizet
Orchestras, Classes A and B
* * *
OBSCURE FASCINATION
"The Hotel," a novel by Elizabeth
Bowen; New York: The Dial Press,
1928. $2.50.
(Courtesy of the Print and Book Shop)
"The Hotel" is a novel splendid in
naturalism. It is remarkable that it
should posess naturalism because it
deals entirely in elusive personalities.
The reader just begins to feel acquaint-
ed when the character goes promptly
into his or her hotel room and closes

the door. This manner of keeping
the characters just ahead of the read-
er's possession lends the book a bril-
liant delicacy which it is impossible
to convey.
The ground work of the story is
somewhat ordinary; being recitation of
the experiences of the guests of an
Italian hotel located on the Riviera.
There emerges from a background of
mystery and confusion, a most uni-
que triangle consisting of an elusive
older woman, a clergyman, and a bril-
liant young girl. The other guests are
amusing and pathetic in a manner
that makes their happiness pitiably
tragic. All of this is told imperson-
ally and mysteriously and, as it is
the end of the season, the book closes
with each guest departing without
leaving or taking away anything of
the personalities or atmosphere of the
hotel.
Arthur Wright
* * *
"VOLPONE"

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TOLSTOY PERHAPS A QUAKER
To the editor:
Your article announcing Professor
R. M. Lovetts lecture contained the
misleading term ". .. Count Leo Tol-
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