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May 05, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

[ICHIGAN E

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i L LIB/ Lt va as ."

SYAVJ

to aAIL. P

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--- -- --W-- --- -- --- -- --

. 1I

OFFICEBS NOMINATED
IN SYMPHONI1C LEAGUE

COLLEGE EDUCATION IS ADVANTAGE
TO WOMEN DESIRING BUYER'S POSITION

Organization In School Of Music
Similar To Women's League
In University

Is

TO ELECT THIS MONTH
Nominations for officers of the
Symphonic league for the year 19'28~
1929 were made yesterday afternoon
at the School of Music by, the nom-
inating com-mittee of the league. The
Symphonic league is the women's or-
ganization of the School of Music,
corresponding to the Women's league
of the University.
The women nonlinated for office
are as follows: president, Carolyn
G. Slepicka, '29, and Helen L. Bus-
sert; vice-president, Dorothy P.,Wil-
son, and Helen N. Marin; secretary,
Beth Seairles, and Madeline Brooks;
treasurer, Natalie Donaldson and
Mable E. Herrick; social chairman,
Orma F. Weber.
Elections will be held the third
week of this month, the exact date
not yet having been fixed,
The president of the Symphonic
League becomes automatically, by
virtue of the office, a member of the
Student council of the School. The
other*members of the council are
the president of the 'men's organiza-
tion, and three other members elect,
ed by the School. There are also two
faculty advisers: Mrs. Harry Bacher,
dean of women, and Mr. Otto Stahl.
The annual activities of the Syn-
phonic league included a candy kit-
chen and sale, the proceeds of which
are used to pay for the annual ban-
quet of the School of Music. This
banquet is sponsored by the league,
but is attended by all students dreg-
istered in the School. The league also
awards a scholarship cup each se-.
mrester to the woman having the
highest grades, both in her music
courses and in any courses which
she may be taking in the University.
If a woman wins this cup for three
consecutive semesters she is allow-
ed to keep it permanently.
Guild Branch To Be
Organized In Boston

"Having a college education gives
advantages to the girl. who desires a
buyers position although it can't pos-
sibly be a substitute for actual ex-
perience," states Miss I. Hohlenkamp,
the buyer for Mack's dress depart-
ment. She went on to further explain
her stand on the question whether a
college education for a future buyer
Iis worth the four years it takes out of
her business experience.
One might at first be tempted to
say that the four years of college is
of no value in the business world, be-
cause a girl must have personality.
No education can give her that," said
Miss Hohlenkamp. "But so many
girls leave high school at a very
young age. Often they would flound-
er around hardly knowing what to do.
WOMEN EDUCATE
MEN IN CHOOCSINVG
POPULAR FLOWERS
"Pull many a flower, born to bloom
unseen" was never conceived with a.
college town as a setting. For, ac-
cording to the owners of various local
flower shops, if a man doesn't knov
just what kind of flowers he wents to
buy, some woman will soon teach him
and no two teachers are the same.
This instruction will come either from

Certainly those first few years spent
in college would be much more valu-
able than what their clumsy efforts at
acquiring experience. In school they
get a finesse which is a great asset.
"Through studies in psychology you
learn to analyze people, which quality
is an absolute requisite in this posi-
tion, and your work becomes much
more Interesting to you. It is neces-
sary that you have plenty of interest
or the goal can't be reached.
"There is one other thing that col-
lege does which is difficult, to eval-
uate. Many young b eop'led not
know how to concentrate and think
properly. While the actual courses
you take are not practical for busi-
ness purposes they often teach one
how to apply her mind.
"Being a buyer is a difficult posi-
tion. She must be a prophet. Here in
Ann Arbor is a much harder place to
work than in a large department store
in Detroit. There things are bought
in lots, for in'a large city no matter
what is shown customers are plentiful,
while here if just the right thing is
not displayed,.it must go unsold. Col-
lege clients are very particular, and
a small thing wrong may prejudice
them.

8i
HEALTH IS iMPORTANT'
TO BUSINEISS WOMEN1
Judge Allen, Addressing Athl c'1
Conference, Stresses Need
Of Physical Fitness
URGES WOMEN TO SERVE
This is the tir of oa ere sof A-t.c1"s
hs ietid o f eiso e the -id-west conference of A.C.A.C.
W., held at Ohio State university last week.i
Florence E. Allen, woman judge of
Ohio Supreme court, and who was a
speaker on the Oratorical association
series in Ann Arbor several weeks

Outdoor Breakfast
And Hike Sponsored
By W. A. A. Members

i

Daily Bulletin of Sportswomen

the girl who is to wear them, or from
the one behind the counter, but it al-
ways comes. Almost every man needs
,Instruction along this line, for very
few of them know what they want1
when they enter a flower shop. If heI
does, it is a good indication that he is
there under orders, or is a "man of
the world."I
Picture any flower shop on a Fri-
day or Saturday, for that is when the'
most business is done., A young man 1
approaches the counter, and says
rather diffidently, 'What do you think
would be nice for our house formal?"
"What color is the girl's gown?"
"I don't know." "What kind of flow-
ers does she like?"
"I-er-well, you see I have never
seen the girl. My roommate got me,
the date.".
The girl behind'the counter nori be-
gins her suggestions, and is usually
able to convince a man in short order.
He knows what he want's, when he
sees it, and does not need to look at
the entire stock. His tastes, in general
run 'to bright colors, although he will
approve of anything that is popular.
Girls in general know what they
want when they undertake to pur-
chase flowers. They at leat't have in
mind the .type of thing they want,
either the color scheme into which
the bouquet, must fit, or its suitabil-
ity for the occasion. 'In this last
named %charateristic however, the
men run a close second. A very com-
mon remark is: "It's a funeral; guess
we'd better have a wreath."
Flowers of course vary with the
season, but show very little change
from year to year. Roses always lead
in popularity, while corsages are at
present showing a tendency to become
smaller.

I
"Siue
be 't
pin t

DOWN THEDIAGONAL
By The Observer
wonder why Sophocles said
nce is a woman's glory." May-
was because he hated to see them
tags on beauty. I daresay it's a

rose-water romance if love blooms,
fades, dies forgotten, unglorified by
that somewhat exalting condition,
silence.
Why do bustling women burst
through life explaining the game of
beanbag they played with their
"beaux," complaining that the weath-
er's so cold the ink in the bottle on
the window sill froze, and declaiming
America's grim condition with the
public reading Mr. H. L. Menken and
paying 10 cents a loaf for bread at the
pastry shop when the price comes to
only nine at the A. and. P.
Silence cheers my mind and I some-
times believe the same effect is pro-
duced on other students who patter
along the sidewalks making straight,
oblique lines between campus build-
ings while the beat of feet throbs like
many pulses. The essence of silence
is shadowed in quietude-the mono-
tone of a saxaphone, the lisping of a
fountain, and a slender finger's touch.
Just as a well groomed horse of the
"gay nineties" grew disgusted at the
silliness of the bearing-rein so do I
revolt from the continuous haggling
and higgling. Because in my silence
I can think and see.1

ago, spoke to the women assembled at'
the mid-west conference of A.C.A.C.
W., at Columbus, Ohio, on April 27.
"Economic opportunities for women
are dependent upon their physical
development," stated Judge Allen,
"and I am convinced that the woman
who neglects her health, and the fun
which Is a result of good health, is
missing a great deal.
"A women has to put her nose to
the grindstone just a little harder
than a man does," she continued.
"The very first commendation that I
had for my work in charge of a grand
jury came from the janitor. It was
very hard for men, at first, to accept
women in the professional fields of
endeavor."
Judge Allen stated her belief that
money independence is not the finest
thing that comes out of the independ-
ence of women, however. "The right
to develop ourselves to the fullest
capacity is the significant thing. My
advice to you is to train yourselves
to render a useful service.
"I will let you into a little secret
of mine," she continued. " One of my
favorite forms of exercise has always
been to chop kindling wood. When I
was a little girl my mother came home
from a meeting of some kind or oth-
er, where she had heard Susan B.
Anthony speak. Susan B. Anthony
had said that she liked) to chop kind-
ling wood. Susan B. Anthony liked to
chop kindling wood, and I liked to
chop kindling wood. Thereupon I be-
came a woman suffragist like Susan
B. Anthony."
ARTIST SEEKS NEW PUBLIC
Diseminating American culture is
one phase of the European sojourn
of Miss Cecil Arden, metroplitan op-
era singer, who will spend the nexi
two years abroad. "Artists need to
change their environnment," she says
"They are like professors, who need
sabbatical years to stimulate them.
Each new public gives something to
the artist."

Another Sunday morning hike, un-
der the sponsorship of W. A. A. will
be taken tomorrow morning. The
group of women planning to go on
the hike will meet at 8 o'clock at
Barbour Gymnasium, and will re-
turn earl"V enough for those who
wish to attend church services to do
so.
The present plans for the hike are
to go out to a fireplace on one of the
islands and cook breakfast out there.
The breakfast meni will be ham and
eggs, rolls and coffee, and ftuit, each
member is asked to bring the sum
of thirty-five cents to cover the ex-
penses of this .food.
Any woman interested in joining
the group which is already planning
co take the hike, should sign up on
the bulletin board at Barbour Gym-
nasium, sometime today. Anyone
wishing further information about
the rrangements Ishould gl in
touch with Margaret Sibley, '30, who
is in charge of the hike.

TENNESSEE ATHLETE TIES
RECORD FOR FREE-THROW
Ellen Baird, forward of the West
Tennessee Teachers College basket-
ball team, recently tied the record-
breaking free .throw made recently
by Margaret McBurney of Edmonton,
Alberta by scoring 57 out of 60
baskets. This breaks the world rec-
ord held by a Japanese woman player
who made 56 out of 60 baskets.
UP_ R_ HARnINR

i

I " Ys 5"Balwollm

Dealer in

ANTIQUES

Upholstering, Furniture
Repairing, Refinishing
and Remodeling
218 East Huron Street
Ann Arbor------Michigan

Acting as an "ambassador of art,"
Miss Theresa Helbo'rn recently went
to Boston to make that city one of
the four American homes of the Theat-
er Guild. In nine years the. Guild has
grown from' a group of 150 members.
to an organization of 2000 in New
York, and it is now bursting its Man-
hattan bonds.
Miss Helborn may be called the
autocrat of the Guild, for she it was
who brought a unified organization
from chaotic groups and placed ar-
tistic presentations of the stage on
a paying basis.

Phone 3432

II'--

A Friendly Rivalry Exists
Between
The'Large Hat
and
The Small One
PUYEAR and HINTZ
Michigan Theatre Building

Sacrificed Saturday
To Make Room for New Summer Shoes We Have
Reduced 100 Pairs
Brooklyn Hand Turned Shoes
Formerly Selling at $10 and $12.50

...

i

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h
1
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"

529 East Liberty Street

New Theatre Building

NewCoatsAre LessNow!

"The Little Store of Big Values"

r

i

Li
L
and
pyir
swi
the
to t
dive
a p
ove
A
hav
swi
hea
the
the
app
fro
un
dem
r.

it

HOSIERY SALE

Pointed Heels, 49c Pair
Others at $1.00 to $1.95

IS OUR OWN SPECIALTY
Mrs. Hanna Does Expert Finger Waving
Miladies Beauty Shoppe
Phone 8383 Over Chubb House

Of Flannel and Crepe and
Georgette

.
_ _

The Hollywood Me
Permanent Wa

.arries And Dives
ccupy Attention Of'
ife - Saving Classes;
ife-saving, with its mingled fun
seriousness, is at present occu-
ng the attention of the Union
naming classes. Hitherto i st of
class periods have been devoted
he mastery of various strokes and
es, but during the last week or so
ortion of each hour has been given
r to the practice of life-saving.
number of different "carries"
e been taught to the-classes. The
immers have thus fair learned the
d carry, the cross-chest carry, and
arm-lock carry. In addition,
re has been instruction in ways of
roaching a drowning person. file
nt approach, back approach, and

LEAGUE HULUS LAS-
PARTY OF__EET
Discovery was made at the la
minute yesterday that the sunbeat
couldn't be m'ade to coine to tl
Women's league party unless tl
building were turned around, so su
stitutions had to be made .fo'r V
decorations.
Since the day was hot, it was d
cided that Sarah Caswell Angell H
should be made to appear as cc
and restful as possible, and this w
the result. All the windows 'jwe
opened wide, and after the floor h
been made white (and slippery) wi
boric acid powder, and after t
great blueish curtain was-drawn on I
stage, the breezes that came in t
windows made the air both icy a
airy. If the committee had or
known about it in time, they mig
have advertised this last League pa
ty of the year as the "coolest spot
town." Perhaps it is just as well tl
they didn't, however, or the crow

Sleeveless

Sweaters

- - mocks

Dresses

323 South Main Street
"The Best Place to Shop After.All"

der-waterd
nonstrated.

thod of
ving

All Colors and White'

$5.00 - $11.50

DOROTHY GRAY

approach have

- $14.95

The Best Values of the Season
The New Styles for Summer

been would have become too large
gether.

I

i. y
......VVVVVVa
h
e
. .
j,
,.
r
,

Helps YouCorrect
Cnlarged Tores

Daily arrivals from our own New York office have brought our

assortments up to pre-season standard,

and clever

women will

buy now, at reductions of one-third to one-half

EPORCEP

]DoiOTHY GRAY has made
two preparations which have been
splendidly successful in overcom-
ing an enlarged pore condition.
Pore Lotion is a clear fragrant.
liquid, which can be patted on all
over your face if your skin is oily.
Its regular use corrects and reduces
enlarged pores. $2.00, $4.00.
Pore Paste is a soothing medi-
cated cream which can be left on
all night. It brings the pores back
to. normal, even though the press-
ing out of blackheads has left them
greatly enlarged. $1.00.

Coats

I

SIZES FOR WOMEN AND
MISSES-14 to 48

Broadcloth
Twill
Satin,
Tweed
Bengalino
Crepe Jollie
Veloria

I

.,. .,
G3
."
..

For Saturday
$6.50

I

91,1 5

eAt our Toiet qoods 'Department,
(First Floor)

Pumps

All New Models
A ITC.# :-

lmoooowmv/v 4 *i

1

AU C1 T ..J .i.~' i h-1

i 11/ l .,' I'

f:.

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