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May 05, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-05-05

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GAN DAILY

womna ".

lished every morning except Monday
the University year by the Board in
) of Student Publications.
iber of Western Crnatereece Erditorial
ation.
Associated Press is exclusively en-
o the use for republication of all news
hes. credited to it or not otherwise
d in this paper and the local news pub-.
herein.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,'
an, as second class matter. Special rate
tage granted by Third Assistant Post-
General.
cription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
es: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
treet.
es: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
0O H. CHAMBERLIN
Ellis F. Merry
Mir igan W ieekly . C(i)lee E-Behymer
Editor.............Philip C. Brooks
jai:. . .. Coartlan C. Sinith
n's Editpr.... ... Marian L. Welles
Editor . .Herbert E. Vedder
r, Books and Music.-Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
nt City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
wart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
fKern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Anderson Sally Knox
ret Arthur T,-,TH. Maloney
. Bochnowaki Marion 'McDonald
Campbell Charles S. Monroe
Chti -h Catherine Price
ard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
ce N. Edeisn aMorris W. Quinn
ret Gross Rita Rosenthal
g Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
ie Follnmer Eleanor Scribner
B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
J. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Hagelshaw George E. Simons
F. Howell Rowena Stillman
lace Hushen Sylvia Stone
R. Kaufman George Tilley
a F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
ce R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAMC. PUSCH
at Manager... George H. Annable, Jr.
sing... .......Richard A. Meyu-
sing..........Edward L. Hulse
sing ............ John W. Ruswinckel
ts. .............Raymond Wachter
ton... ,....George B. Ahn, Jr.
tion........Harvey Talcott
Assistants
Bradley Ray Hofelich
Brummneler Hal A. Jaehn
.arpeviter )ames Jordan
K.. Correll Marion Kerr
Cromell Thales N. Lenington
nivPeh ratherine McKinven
V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
elker Alex K. Scherer
ne Frohne George Spater
ss Fuller Ruth Thompson
e Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
Gross Lawrence Walkley
HIammer Hannah Wallen
. Hammer

of this resignation vindicate themselv-
es before the educational world, for
the benefit of the entire University.
Certain it is that nothing can de-
tract from the prominence of Profes-
sor Rankin in his field, or from his
service as a faculty member here.
'HE JOINT CONCERT
Furthering the present good feeling
between the two largest educational
institutions of Michigan, the bands of
the University and Michigan State
college joined last night i the first
joint concert that two large college
bands have ever given formally. The
concert not only helped to cement
good feeling between the two schools,
but also aided the present move which
the Varsity band is making to avoid
unit playing and maneuvers.
Last fall, for the first time, the
bands of Michigan and of the oppos-
ing universities combined during foot-
ball games to abolish rivalry, and
combine the pageantry and music. At
all of the games, this was success-
ful, and next season will see this
move which the University started
carried into other schools throughout
the country.
Last night's concert was made pos-
sible because the leaders of the two
bands were brothers. Otherwise it
might have been impossible. Michi-
gan's band has long held a place
among the leading college bands of
the country, but very few, if any col-
leges, precede Michigan in the mat-
ter of innovations in cementiig friend-
ship between schools, and in the
abolishing of the intense rivalry which
used to be concurrent with the game
on the field.
PLAY PRODUCTION
Looking back upon a history of good
.dramatic efforts poorly supported,
Play Production under the direction
of Earl Fleischman is planning a new
bid for the interest of campus thea-
ter goers when it presents "The Play's
The Thing" next week in the Mimes
theater. The play in itself is one of
the newer dramatic compositions
which appear here during the year
and is still continuing a" one 4
the major Broadway attractions. It is
of rather an unusual'nature but has
had a successful tour of the coun-
try and still continues in popularity.
As a vehicle towards assuring the
success of the endeavor, the cast has
been drawn not from one group or
organization of actors but from an en-
tire array of campus dramatic talent.
Such a move seems indeed 'a prudentf
one on the part of Play Production
and it may well be hoped that itst
reaction will be a successful one. Thea
organization's past has been far from
successful and continually small aud-
iences have been discouraging to say
the least. Still its directors are plan-
ning another capable production and
in doing so are taking a step at once
courageous andl deserving of betterE
support.

TOASTED-ROLL
I IIN G !t
BANG'
.WI E STARTED to tell you
yesterday all about the
wheezing Asthma w h o
accuses Jeb of accepting
"hush money" and enough to "estab-
lish himself in business" at that.
NOW JEB HAS already decided up-
on what sort of work he will do after
e-mmencement begins to start to com-
mence.
IN HIS OWN WORDS borrowed
from disreputable authority Jeb is
going to dig wells, trenches, sewers,
or anything 'cause he wants to start
at. the top.
REGISTRATION IS ALL over with,
and now that all the "big shots" have
afforded themselves the opportunity
to stand at the booths and gain pub-
licity, don't forget--Jeb for president'
of the Union; write his name on the
ballot and he promises to be Shot and
Missin' both after he's elected.
* * *
WHICH IS WHICH?
Ycm W KOLe
IN

THEATER
BOOKS
THE BAND CONCERT
A review By Harold May
While the uniting of the M. S. C.
band with the University band in a
joint concert may have shown that
there existed a fine spirit of amity
between the two leading Michigan
schools, it certainly produced noth-
ing good in the way of music or even
of good band music. The audience
was treated, in the more ambitious at-
tempts of the bands, as the Largo
from Dvorack's "New World Symph-
ony," to the comic spectacle of wildly
waving cornetist's fingers, and earn-
est but puzzled clarinetists, the
horns failed several times to get the
right pitch, and no one successfully
completed a run.
The program was begun under the
leadership of the local Falcone who
led the two bands through a march
and two nondescript "conc-ert" num-
bers, after which the visiting brother
took the baton and, after a march and
several other numbers, ended his pro-
gram with a pot-pourri of patriotic
and sentimental airs. There was little
to choose between the two conductors
except that the visiting man knew
that a march should be brisk.
When the bands were allowed to
play marches they performed well,
but in any other attempt they had
what seemed to be insuperable tech-
nical difficulties. Let the musicians
ally themselves with the h-umblest
jazz orchestra; they will find when
they return from a season with it that
they know more about the possibili-
ties and limitations of their instru-
ments than they ever knew before-
in a jazz orchestra the instrument
has to be heard and some originality
has to be shown.

HOUSE
MANAGERS
Get Your
BAKED GOODS'
and
Delicatessen
Reouirements
from
The FEDERAL

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HOURS-8 A. M. to 11 P. M.

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EVERY DAY

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Saunder's Canoe Livery
= On the Huron River at the Foot of Cedar St.
""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""'"""""""""""" " "~lEEEE~lEN UEIEI~t111E11~l

COFFEE'CAKES
BREADS
SWEET ROLLS
FOR TOASTING
PASTRIES AND
PIES
OF ALL KINDS

OUR CAFETERIA
Is So Different
If You Dine Here
You Will Come
Again
Good Food
ReasonablyPriced

It's great to look at the stuff the
gentle' sophomores pull off on the pe-
tit freshmen nowadays and think of
the times that used to be.
* * S
FIRST OF ALL there's this- the
same fellow was elected by the class
of '30 for the fourth consecutive time
to head his mates in the games. In
the good old days, they say (and
there's proof enough of it), if any
captain ever lived more than long
enough to start the march down to
the old Medic grounds, it was a mir-
acle.

E
YY
l
S
I
l
T
r

.
..

MAY FESTIVALAy7 ,
Alnn Arbor, May 16, 17, 18, 19,

MRS. GEORGE S. RICHARDS
ALL-STAR MUSICAL COURSE
Spalding Hotel
Duluth, Minnesota
March 1st, 1928.

. +.

Subscribe For The Weekly.

Mr: Charles A. Sink, Pres.,
University Musical Society,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.

SATURDAY,

MAY 5, 1928.

it Editor-GEORGE C. TILLEY
BANKIN'S RESIGNATION
ie resignation of Prof. Thomas E.
kin, member of the faculty for 21
s, is a matter which may well
pause to the thoughtful persons
ie University. If the incident were
rring because a new position
s greater .opportunity for the
orician in a.larger or better sphere,
itations would be in order, but
the situation as it seems to be
L can hardly be the case, and the
-nation of Professor Rankin as-
es a somewhat unpleasant 'phase.
> one denies that Professor Ran-
has achieved an eminent position
te field of rhetoric which he still
pies. Entering the University as
culty member more than a score;
ars ago, he has steadily risen to3
)sition of national importance,
ig rhetoricians, and has produced,
r alone or in collaboration live;
s which are widely used as texts3
eference works.-
spite of this long experience and,
ent position, however, a new head 'I
he rhetoric department was cho-
last fall from a foreign univer-t
and from a younger generation,1
Peter Munro Jack. It is impos-
of course,to sayrdefinitely that9
fact, was alone responsible forE
resent resignation; it is scarcelyf
ble, on the other hand, that Pro-s
r Rankin failed to feel the dis-}
ntment which his friends exper-i
d at that time.g
s not our province to posit thev
and wrong of this situation, andb
that time a number of factors,
as the introduction of the Uni- -
.y College project, have entereds
tim consideration. There is al-p
a narrow shade which separatesa
ess from tyranny, however, and i
versity administration which in-1
to be firm should always watchv
t overstep the bounds. A Uni-
y, while it must have cohesion e
eadership, needs also scholars,'
he cost of losing a man of thea
ments of Professor Rankin is b
light one. i
vould be utterly unfair to con- e
the administration for the caus- a
ich brought the resignation at
ime, for several reasons-- first s
ich is the fact that no one can i
solutely sure that these causes o
utside of the principals themselv- i
ersons with the best interests c
University at heart wish the
of Professor Jack, and the fu-

AND THE FRESH FROSH were not
the whining wimmen they are now.
Rooh!I That class of '12, the terrible
demons who retaliated thus to the ul-
timatum of the no less terrible '11's.
* *-*
"Pray ye poodles, ye pale, puny, piti-
able, penny-packers, ye paralytic par-
simonious parrots who partake of
Parker's "Port" and "Pale;" ye pe-
culiar parts of humans who aspire
not to pass out of the state of par-
vinanity but persist in perpetrating
your putrid habits," etc.--
DOZE WAS FRESHMEN what was
real frosh, but there was a reason
for their indominatable wrath, for
among the proclamations of the class
of '11 were included such as these:

"THE PLAY'S THE THING"
It isn't very often that a college
dramatic society has a chance to give,
a play, while it is still packing them
in on Broadway with an all-star cast
and-Holbrook Blinn! But here Play
Production, under the able leadership
of Earl Fleischman, has announced
that "The Play's The Thing" will be
rendered by their gang, beginning
next Wednesday night, for a four-day
run in the Mimes theater.
Mr. Molnar's little bit, which many
Ann Arborites saw earlier in the year
with Blinn and company in Detroit,
is said to have drawn much of the
campus talent, ("outside the play pro-
duction classes") to the fold in an at-
tempt to do the thing handsomely. The
cast will be headed by Richard Woell-
haf, grad., who once did well in an
O'Neill play here on campus. He will
have the part of Sandor Turai, the
Blinn role,..in which to speak broken
language and twist his mustache.
Minna Miller, another graduate stu-
dent and also known as the leading
guidon of a recent Junior girls' play
will have the feminine lead of ilona
Szaba. Others of the dramatic talent
from the whole campus will be Samuel
Bonnell, '28Ed., as Mansky, Charles
Holden, '29, Fred Crandall, '28, Charles
Peake, '28, and George Johnson, '30.
The play, for the rights of which
Mr. Fleischman put in lots of work,
is satirical and rather sophisticated.
While the Old Lady from Dubuque
might misunderstand many parts, it
is an excellent play for the hot sea-
son. If well done, and it may be at
that, it will probably be one of the
best shows to be seen on campus yet,
and may be recommended.

Look over but don't overlook
our Delicatessen when plan-
ning your canoe ride 'or
hike.
Pickles, Salads, Plates,
Napkins
And Everything

My dear Mr. Sink:-
Having seen an announcement of your 1928 May
Festival, may I congratulate you upon the .splendid
programs? The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, with
Frederick Stock conducting, is a Festival in itself.
Music lovers of this vicinity quite envy you since for
the past ten years Duluth's All-Star Course has
sought an appearance for our city, witb n o success.
Life is not a holiday, but an education. As we
advance in this education, we look back .with ever in-
creasing gratitude for the refining influences of good
music as it has been woven in at life's various stages.
I congratulate you upon your privilege of pre-
senting music of such a high standard to your large
audiences of most impressionable age, and them for
the educational and cultural benefits derived from
listening to such a fine array of attractions listed for
the "Ann Arbor May Festival."

9;

114 South Main
Phone 3454

St.

With kind regards,
(Signed) MRS. GEORGE S. RICHARDS

BR/C.

CLASSIFIED
ADS PAY

Course Tickets-$5.50-$6.O-$7.00I

' , *,

1 EL

' SPRING GAMES
Each spring and fall the freshmen
and sophomore classes seem to find
it necessary to lock horns in their
fall and spring games; and each fall
and spring the usual excitement, riv-
alry, and resulting good entertain-
ment is furnished by the two under-
classes. It is interesting and it, is
wholesome fun, and it serves as a
safety valve for class rivalry which
might otherwise accomplish quite dif-
ferent things, and it is a tradition
which well. deserves the preservation
which it receives.
Yesterday the sophomore class took
two of the three tugs in the tug-of-
war from the freshmen, and thereby
got off to the proverbial flying start.
This morning the remaining three
events will be staged on South Ferry
field, and when the sod has been re-
stored one class or the other will
have the plume of victory or super-
iority or whatever plume it is a class
gets for this kind of thing, and that
will be the end of all interclass
brawls for the year.
It is desirable, of course, that a
large portion of the freshmen and
sophomore classes turn out to partici-
pate in these games, for. they are,
after all, very good fun. To take them
in deadly seriousness, however, would
be considerable of a mistake, and it
would be an error which might end
seriously or in injury to someone. Aft-
er all there are bigger things in col-
lege careers than interclass contests,
and while kicking and scratching may
be legitimate, biting and fighting (as
ndulged in by members of these class-
es at their so-called games last fall)
are scarcely desirable.
So with the best of luck to both
ides, and especially to the freshmen,
t is only just to state that the cares
of the world and the future of human-
ty are in no way bound up with the
ontests this morning.
Secretary Wilbur's request for $300,-

"YOU SHALL NOT trespass on our
game preserves at Ypsi.
"YOU SHALL NOT make goo-goo
eyes at the coeds.
"YOU SHALL NOT drink beers or
chase dears."
* * *
(MUSIC AND DRAMA JUST WALK-
ED IN) That ought to get a laugh.
* * *
JUST IMAGINE what they'd do to
him in the days of yore!! Wonder
which of the dishes on the menu of
the awful class of '07 he'd be.
* * *

Where

Hope

x

Blooms Again

0

INCIDENTALLY that must have
been a real meal, that grand Fresh-
man Barbecue of '05 or thereabouts
when that group formed the sopho-
more body. They had Fresh spuds with
eyes out and Fresh green peas and
Fresh brains (?) in season and other
yum-um.
* * *
THAT BUNCH WAS really feroc-
ious, and how they ordered the ver-
dant frosh about really was quite a
pity what with orders prohibiting
them from eating hamburgers "with"
and advising them that socks and ties
were to be seen and not heard.
* * *
SEE IF YOU CAN picture the good
old 'days when such stuff as this was
said and really meant: When the pale
moon steals through the mackerel
skies over the cold and slimy walls
where the mouldering dead within,
hanging by. the ears, dance in high
glee in anticipation of the babes of
'08," etc.-
* * *
ANYWAY, IT'S GREAT TO BE'
able to think that our class of '29
won't lose in the games today. Four1
times in battles, two each with '28
and '30, the wreath of laurel was de-
nied the privilege of resting on the
bald domes of us Caesars.1
* * *
EVEN. AFTER winding the rope
around several trees the other bunchC

C. S.M.
* * *
CONCERTO RECITAL
The third annual concerto evening
will take place in Hill auditorium,
Wednesday, May 9, at 8 o'clock, when
five pianists, two singers, and one
violinist, who have been selected from
the senior class of the University
School of Music will appear as solo-
ists with the University Symphony
Orchestra.
The program, interesting and var-
ied, is as follows:
Delibes: Czardas..........Orchestra
Beethoven: Piano Concerto, C minor,
first movement .. Elizabeth Schwier
Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto, G min-
or, second and third movements
-W. :Dorr Legg
Ponchielli: "Voce di donna" from
"Gioconda" .;........Bessie Sickles
Schumann: Introduction and Allegro
Appassionato ... Marion Johnson
Beethoven: Violin Concerto, first
movement.........Beth Hamilton
Grieg: Piano Concerto, first move-
ment............. Margaret File
Mendelssohn: "If With All Your
Hearts," from "Elijah"
-Odra O. Patton
Tschaikovsky: Piano Concerto, B flat

Not so long ago the country side was a drab
picture-cold and desolate, with all life wait-
ing for the coming of spring. And now it is
being garbed in a mantel of welcome green
with the myriads of flowers cheering the
hearts of all.

ft
-S
.P
fi

Just as they bring hopes for spring
and summer, this Bank brings hope
for Financial prosperity and Pro-
gress. Our experienced advice is
designed, to make your financial
hopes continue to brighten.

ANN ARBOR SAVINGS BANK

;S

101 N. Main St.

707 N. University Ave.

11 ! - :

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