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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 21, 1928 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, APRIL 2

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third - Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
14.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor...................Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Staff editor.. .....Philip C. Brooks
City Editor...... ...ourtland C. Smith
Women's Editor.........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor..........Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Assistant City Editor.:. Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Sally Knox
Margaret Arthur John H. Maloney
Alex A. Bochnowski Marion McDonald
Jean Campbell Charles S. Monroe
essie Church Catherine Price
Blanchard W. Cleland Harold L. Passman
uia rence N. Eelseso Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Nita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Eleanor Scribner
James B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
Robert J. 'Gessner Robert G. Silbar
Elaine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Alice Hagelshaw George E. Simons
Joseph E. Howell Rowena Stillman
J. Wallace Hushen Sylvia Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
William F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J: Kline Benjamin S. Washer
lack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Teleph one 21214"
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising............Richard A. Meyew
Advertising............ Edward L. Hulse
Advertising ............ John W. Ruswinrckel
Accounts.............. . .Raymond Wachter
Circulation..............George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication...................Harvey Talcott
Assistants
George Bradley Ray Hofelich
Marie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
James Carpenter Jmes Jordan
Charles K. Correll Marion Kerr
Barbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington
Mary Divery Catherine McKinven
Bessie V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
Ona Felker Alex K. Scherer
Katherine Frohne George Spater
Douglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E: Varnum
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkley
E. . Hammer Hannah Wallen
Car W. Hammer
SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1928.
Night Editor-MILTON KIRSHBAUM

the oldest and best-known' of the Uni-
versity's activities. The publicity that
the Opera annually brings to the
Michigan campus is of undeniable
advantage, whether the production be
fair or better, for the show is in-
variably a call to the alumni in the
more scattered cities to gather around
and renew a few memories and ac-
quaintanceships. It is this renewal
process that supplies the impetus for
larger propects to the benefit of all.
But there is another side to the
Opera activity, one that is not so
widely stressed, namely, the advan-
tage to the participants themselves.
The time spent by the choruses and
committees is not so extensive after
all, and the trip is well worth it. It
presents an opportunity for traevl un-
der the best of circumstances, for
gaining valuable experience in the
details of production-technical and
dramatic-and for coming into contact
with alumni.
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
Iconfidential uponnrequest. Letters pub-
lished should not be construed as ex-
pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE AGAIN
For the sake of a better under-
standing of the University College
problem it seems desirable, if possi-
ble, to find some fundamentals upon
which there must be general agree-
ment. The writer suggests the fol-
lowing:
1. The real question involved is:
How can the University, not the Lit-
erary College or the Engineering Col-
lege, best serve the students who
come here as freshmen and sopho-
mores? It is the University, not a
particular college, which the public
holdsresponsible for what happens
to these students.
2. Whether or not the University
College should be established is of
vital concern to all faculties. This is
true, (a) because work done later
in all the schools and colleges de-
pends upon what students do, what
choices they make and what inter-
ests, attitudes and habits of study
they develop during the freshman and
sophomoge years, and (b) because
members of all faculties share, willy-
nilly, in the credit or blame attach-
ing to the results of an action which
is so distinctively a University ac-
tion.
3, While all are vitally concerned,
no faculty nor all of them combined
should settlethe matter of establish-
ing the University College for the
following reasons:
(a) No faculty can be expected
to decide, purely on its merits and
free from college, department and
personal interests and bias, a prop-
osition which would reduce its num-
ber of students by more than half
and raise many questions as to what
will happen to its various depart-
ments and instructional staff. The
College of Literature, Science, and
Arts, that mother of schools and col-
leges, has nearly always gone
through a prolonged and painful
period of labor whenever a new
school or college was born. Some-
times a Caesarian operation has
been necessary.
(l The fact that a man is a
successful specialist in Geology, Min-
eralogy, Spanish, Political Science,
Latin, School Finance, Marketing,
Electrical Engineering, Pathology,
Law or Oral Hygiene does not make

him an authority on the educational
needs of freshmen, even though he
teaches his specialty to freshmen,
which many of us do not. We

ROLL
.'OW
COMIES
THE STUDENT COUNCIL has set
the day of May 9, as the time when
all promising local politicians will do
their dirty work. As we remarked
yesterday the University aims to pre-"
pare all students for future activi-
ties.
THE WOMEN'S VOTE has always
been a strong factor so we advise
that every manager get at least one
good looking candidate on his ticket.
These may be hard to find, but found
they must be.
* * *
AT THAT, IF the women could have
voted for the president of the UnionI
last year we think the result may
have been different. Not that the,
present president is to be slammed,
but his opponent, oh, well-.
PHI BETA KAPPA
NOW THAT WE come to the end
of the column we think it proper to
pass a few remarks. In the first place
a certain person was elected and did
not know how to fill out an applica-
tion for membership. Well, perhaps
!he did get grades.
* * *
BESIDES THAT THE person who
wrote this column yesterday was elec-
ted and if any of you read that you
have an idea what a Phi Bete is
like. Deliver us, please.
BUT THE INITIATION into thef
order will make them smart. Espec-
ially if paddles are used.
NOW, WE DON'T KNOW f
Dear Jeb:
"The American girl," says Count
Keyserling in an interview printed
in The Daily of yesterday, "is the most
original in the world. No other coun-
try has anything like her."
No, Count, no other nation has any-,
thing remotely like her, and this fact
constitutes our respect for foreign
nations.
Lark. .
BUT, LARK, DO you think that the
Count included the co-eds in this?
* * *
KENYON BUTTERFIELD
EXPECTED TO RESIGN

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC
"PORGY"
JDuBose Heyward i a white man-
which is not particularly news. Other
men have been white before him. But
Heyward wrote a play about negroes
in which the white man does not ap-
pear, nor does the inter-racialnprob-
lem. That has been news for the last
six months in New York, and pre-
sumably is still news in Detroit, for
the play, "Porgy," opens Monday,
April 30, with Rose McClendon as
Serena, accompanied by the authentic
Jenkins Orphanage Band. The Ma
sonic Temple will house this pageant
of negro life in Catfish Row.
As a novel, "Porgy" was tremend-
ausly popular when it came out about
three years ago. So much so, in fact,
that wise friends of author Heyward
suggested transforming it into a play.
Hesitation gave way to decision, and
novelist Heyward invited better-half
Mrs. Heyward to collaborate. The re-
sult has been a tremendous success
in New York when finally the Theater
Guild sponsored its production after
competing producting found it too dif-
ficult. Feminists may argue for the
play; both play and novel have been
successful.
More a pageant than a plotty sort
of thing, "Porgy" rides on the back of
soniextraordinary characters; steve-
(lores, hot-babies, and one thing and
another including a particulargmain-
my who is "hipped and busted" ex-
actly like white Mrs. Rutledge-an
important consideration when Mrs.
Rutledge gives her some old cloth-
es. R. L. A.
. *
ZONA GALE
Spring, instead of bringing poesies
and poets, is bringing a "brilliant wo-
man novelist"-Zona Gale of Portage,
Wisconsin. She will be amongst us
April 26, at Hill auditorium for the
price of fifty cents under, the au-
I spices of the American Association of
4 University Women and our own little
Inlander.
Miss Gale is not married; she is
54 years old. At the University of
Wisconsin she earned her Bachelor
degree in Letters, and later her Mas-
ters. She then worked for several
years in Milwaukee on newspaper
staffs, but gave up the "beer village"
for the Big City where she was af-
filiated with the New York World.
However, at. present, her residence is
back in Pbrtage, the hamlet of her
birth.
Despite the fact that Miss Gale earn-
ed her apprenticeship in the news-
paper world and is a constant' con-
tributor to current magazines and per-
iodicals, she is primarily a novelist.
In fact, she is known only as a novel-
ist. Her first book was published in
1906, entitled "Romance Island." She
became well known in her "Friend-
ship Village Stories"-1909-and upon
the success of these stories she later
added editions called "Love" and
"Peace," "Miss Lulu Bett," and other
novels and plays.
R.J.G.

Whitney Theatre
SAT.- NIGHT, APRIL 28
The Musical Romance
a u i a e

1

-- - -- -- - ---- - - - - - - ..
"The Pride of Ann Arbor"
Wolverine Cafe
Opposite Wuerth Theater

i'
41

k lm

mms

By SIGMUND ROMBERG
Composer of "Blossom Time"
and "The Student Prince"
Singing Company of 100
Rousing Male Chorus'
Dixie Girl Chorus of 35

h .

Just because you are not at home
is no reason for you to go without
good home cooking. Drop in here
after the show or dance for French
pastry and delicious sandwiches.
Your appetite for chicken will be
well satisfied Sunday.

ddkBdbmb

3 Baggage Cars of Scenery
Special Orchestra

I

ANOTHER MASSIVE
SHUBERT PRODUCTION

Music That Thrills
Prices: Orch. 3.30; Balcony, 2.75
2,20, 1.65; Gal. 1.10

Radio Music

Lunches

Private Booths

f ' I .

tV

QUALITY.
a i i

P
9 "

4
.4,

QUALITY.

Get Your Painting Out
of the Way Early This Year

EVERYTHING IN PAINT, VARNISHES, POL-
ISHES, ETC. AT THIS STORE
Rent the Electric Floor Polisher

by the day $2.00

7''Wt i

GARDEN TOOLS

LAWN ROLLERS

LAWN HOSE

D. M. Ferry's Lawn Seed 45c per lb.
oUALY. Jno. C. Fischer Co.
lain, near Washington Washington, near Man
RIO RI

THE THINKER
Meditative thought, for the sake of
pure meditation and without any mon-
etary remuneration as an inspiration,
is a rare thing in America, and per-
haps the situation is a fortunate one
for the sake of our material progress.
It is doubly interesting none the less,
for an American audience to have an
opportunity to hear one of the few
remaining meditative personages of
the old world, as an American aud-
ience did Thursday night with the ap-
pearance of Count Keyserling, and
the Count's ideas concerning the mod-
ern world carry a rather novel tinge
to the staid academic atmosphere of
an American university.
Much of the material stated by the
famous German is debatable, to be
sure, and any allegation which asserts
that we have not, as yet, begun to
make spiritual progress is founded
on rather dangerous ground. As an
analyst of the commercial and indus-
trial spirit of the age, however, Count
Keyserling stands as one of the most
interesting personalities of his genera-
tion-a generation which he believes
to be "fossilized."
His rather cynical view of our own
age, however, a view which sees us
approaching the "crisis" and forget-
ting our sympathy with nature, can
hardly mean a great deal to the av-
erage layman. As a means of ar-
raigning decadent institutions, or of
stimulating creative thought, the
alarmist view is perhaps a good one,
but to the average man, the man of
common ideas, there can be no uni-
versal conception.
Taken in a single brpad sweep of
imagination, the world situation is
perhaps true as pictured by the Count.
But the world situation can not be
taken in such a single broad sweep, for
world situations do not exist like that;
and only by extracting grains from a
myriad of complex situations can the
ablest thinkers reach conclusions of
a general nature. The average man
is an individual, a unitary -conscious-
ness, and he is a thinking man as a
rule; but engaged as he is in material
pursuits his conception of world cris-
es founded on imaginative hypothesis
is likely to be somewhat hazy.
Thinkers who are purely meditative
serve a purpose for mankind without
a doubt, and when they reach the
stage of constructive philosophy their!
ideas can often be turned to practical

"GOSH,"
senior, "M.
breaks."

-Yesterday's Daily-
SAID A certain retiring
S. C. gets all the good!

* * *

MICHIGAN MEMORIES
"I'm glad this didn't happen
three weeks ago," cried the puff-
ing professor, as he chased his
wind-tossed hat across the cam-
pus.

know our subjects and perhaps we
know how to teach them effectively
to graduate students, seniors, jun-
iors and possibly sophomores and
freshmen. But we are not familiar
with the biological, psychological,
social and educational considera-
tions which should be taken into ac-
count in determining what should
be done for freshmen and how this
can be done most effectively.
4. Final disposition of such a ques-
tion must rest, subject to approval
by the Board of Regents, with the
President of the University whoj
is responsible fors developing and
carrying out the educational pol-
icies of the University as a
whole. Naturally, the President will
avail himself, as he has in this case,
of the best assistance that other of-
ficero of the University can give him.
He should seek, as he has done, the
criticisms and objections, of the var-
ious faculties. He may call to his aid
the services of specialists in higher
education who are not connected with
the University. Possibly he should
have a cabinet composed of a few of
those individuals whose duties re-
quire them to think in terms of edu-
cational problems which affect the

* C. *
EXPEL TWO UNIVERSITY EDITORS
CHARGING BAD TASTE IN POLICY
-Yesterday's Daily.
"Yes," remarked Benjamin Bolt, "a
fellow has to be careful nowadays.'
BUT THAT LEAVES HOBBS OUT
Dearest Rolls:
For months we have sympathetical-
ly watched your unresting and untir-
ing efforts aimed to the ultimate per-
fection of a suffering humanity; and
with these few feeble remarks we
blushingly offer, through you, a new
pastime to the world. This game is
WEASEL.
The players range in number from
two to thirty-seven, blind persons be-
ing automatically excluded. The ob-
ject of the game is for the player to
cause his opponents to score less
points than he. Points are accrued
as follows:
On perceiving a gentleman ensconc-
ed beneath one of those ecstatic der-
bies, so favored by fashion of late,I
the player, points excitedly with the1
left index finger at the offending per-
soi and cries simultaneously,
* * *
"WEASEL! ?
scoring three points for himself in a
notebook carried in upper right vest
pocket.
A silk hat scores ten points for the
first player to cry "Long Weasel!" and1
point.
Special awards of points will be
explained in tomorrow's column, or
later.
INhom D'Plumej

MISS WYLIE IN PROSE
"Mr. Hodge and Mr. Hazard," a
novel by Elinor Wylie; New York:
Alfred Knopf; $2.50.
(Courtesy of the Print and Book
Shop)
This is Miss Wylie's third important
venture in prose, although the criti-
cal distinction between this and her
poetry is still slight, She is gtill
the exquisite lyricist, producing well
turned and rhythmic sentences, and
covering all with a delicate veil of
sly humor.
In "Mr. Hodge and Mr. Hazard,"
she has postulated another member
of the Romantic Poets. Mr. Hazard
is a composite a bit of Swinburne,
a little Landor, a little Bryon, and
a great deal of Shelley. He is, like that
"orphan angel" flapping his wings
ineffectually in the same luminous
void. But although Mr. Hazard has
dreamed of great achievement- of
great blows for freedom, of great
dramas and mighty epics- he has
done nothing, and is scorned by his
family and the public that knows him
as an impractical radical.
That is, until one summer when he
is rusticating in a little town on the'
Thames, with seven Hebrew gram-
mars, his Milton and his Plato, and at-
tempting to dramatize the Book of
Job. There he meets Allegra, her
sister, Penserosa, and her mother,
Lady Clara Hunting. Although he is
nearly fifty and she is barely fifteen,
he basks in a romantic attachment
the entire summer- the nature of
which is rather difficult to analyze;
Miss Wylie merely calls it an "elegiac

r , -
A Monument of Service
Great cities today quite marvelously reveal what
efforts Man ls making in the building of Monu-
F ments to Industry. Feats of engineering..,. from
massive- tunnels to still higher skyscrapers. / hee
tofore believed mpsilaenow rate ~ y
they speak well for heresolution, patience, and
unity of their builders.
i1
~~JII~ The same spirit prevails in this Bank -.
~IJ1~ From the president down, all of our em-
poyees are working together . .. di-
gently, willingly ..,. to make this bank-
I a Financial Service to every citizen 11
this Community.
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
101 N. Main St. 707 Univ. Ave.
4 0b
O~r
C J

,' F

k~.
J
/",

* * *
ALL THE RULES were not given '
today because it was thought that
the students should be given an op-

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