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January 17, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-17

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PAGE FOUR.

-rHE MICHIGAN DAILY

TU.1. .rR 7.t.+A Y, JANUARY '17, 19.28

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'FVIDAY, JANUARY 17, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conferetice Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master tGeneral.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN

ONWARD SCIENCE!
With the reception of a complete
studio scene in minute detail over the
radio, another dream long looked upon
as a possibility, has been realized.
Radio waves have now been shown
capable of carrying both audition
and vision to private homes, and
science has taken another tremendous
stride onward.
The technical details of the process
are not nearly as important as the
fact that the feat has been accomp-
lished. With the first reception re-
corded and undoubtedly shown to be
fact, experts are already busy experi-
menting with the possibilities in
range of the new system which has
been termed television. Tests and
time will remedy inevitable early im-
perfections.
The advances in recent years made
in scientific circles are many and
noteworthy. Science has arrived at
the stage where any new and even re-
mote possibility is regarded with
fervor rather than incredibility as was
the case in the days before the inven-
tion of airplanes, steamboats and
radio.

REFORM
Three cheers and a hip, hip!Every
one has decided the University should
have a restaurant, all of its own.
* * ,
As the only true representative of
the student body that can make itselfo
heard, we are framing the idea in the
form of a proposition.
* * *
Resolved, That the sum of Four dol-
lars should be added to 'the tuition ofb
every student, for which every stu-
dent will get the privilege, in fact willK
be compelled, to qat two meals a day
at the University's expense.e
* * t]
Of course, the practical part of the
enforcement of this enactment will bet
left to the office of the Dean of Stu-
dents. Rolls may have started the
idea, but we're not going to be re-
sponsible for the consequences.
RELAXED FOR VACATIONS

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC
TONIGtH T': Tle Students' Recital in
the Schtool of Music auditorium at S
o'clock.
* * *
THE MIMES
"Icebound," the Owen Davis Pu-
litzer Prize play, which was to have
been presented next week has been
withdrawn temporarily from the
Mimes' schedule, and instead "Sev-
enth Heaven" will be revived for
three performances, Thursday, Friday
and Saturday of this week.

Ft II

i

Bargain Tables

are always a feature at

GAHAlVIS

I

Both Ends of the Diagonal

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"" """""."..... ". .."

Editor.. ........Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly..C harles E. Behymer
Staff Editor.......... .Philip C. Brooks
City Editor...........Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor............Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr
relegraph Editor... ........ Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.... RichardsC. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patiick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Marion McDonald
Margaret Arthur Richard H. Milroy
E emons A. Bonfield Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Church H arold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland PierceRRosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Edward J. Ryan
James B3. Freeman David Scheyer
Robert J. Gessner Eleanor Scribner
Elaine E. Gruber Corinne Schwarz
Alice Hagelshaw Robert G. Silbar
J oseph E. Rowell Howard F. Simon
Wallace Hushen Rowena Stillman
Charles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby (George Tilley
LawrenceFR. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Jack L. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdjing
John H. Maloney
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr
Advertising..............Richard A. Meyer
Advertising..............Arthur M'. IHinkley
Advertising...............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising............. John W. RuswinckeI
Accounts................Raymond Wachte
Circulation.............George B. Ahn, Jr
Publication...................Harvey Talcot
Assistants

yl
r
s
h
S
r
s
k

George Bradley
Mlrarie Brumler
James 0. Brown
James Carpenter
James B. Cooper
Charles K. Correll
Barbara Cromell
Mary Dively
Bessie V. Egeland
Ona Felker
Katherine Frohne
Douglass Fuller
Beatrice Greenberg
Relen Cross
F. J. Hammer
Carl W. Hammer
Ray Elotelich

IHal A. Jaehm
amnes Jordan
Marion Kerr
Thales N. Lenington
Catherine McKinven
WV. A. AMahahfy
Francis D. Patrick
"George M. Perrett
Alex K. Scherer
Frank Schuler
George Spater
Wilbert Stephenson
Ruth Thompson
Herbert E. Varnuin
Lawrence Walkley
Hannah Wallen

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1928
Night Editor-PAUL J. ,RN
TIHE MOVIE
One of the very obviously worth
while projects in connection with th
general program that aims to bring
the alumni closer to the University iq
the recently completed University
moving picture. It has long been on
of the regrettable phases of our edu
cational system that men and women
once graduated, gradually grow away
from the institution with which they
are connected; and it is still more re-
grettable when an alumnus who i,
really interested is unable, through
pressure of personal affairs, to return
for years and years to the school a
which he received his degree.
The recently completed moving pic-
ture, in its distribution to alumni
groups throughout the country, can-
not help but awaken many fond rem-
iniscences and cannot help but give
the graduates an idea of the tremend-
ous expansion of Michigan in the last
few years. The picture itself is an
excellent piece of photography, and
has caught the spirit of the University
in a dignified and entertaining man-
ner.
Exhibition to alumni and to the stu-
dents are not the only fields in which
the moving picture can prove useful,
however, and though the authorities
in charge have not, as -yet, broached
the idea it seems on the surface as
though a large number of state high
schools would be willing and glad to
show the picture. The predominance
of the University in the educational
field of Michigan is such that any
high school student-considering a con-
tinuation of his education cannot help
but considering continuing it here,
and with the growing numbers of such
students it would be both enlighten-
ing and helpful to distribute the film
among them. The organization of the
University Extension division would
serve well for the scheduling of such
showings, and with the general prac-
tice of holding high school assemblies
it would be a comparatively simple
matter to disseminate through the pic-
ture an idea of the educational insti-
tution that represents Michigan.
It is to be hoped that this possibility
of giving high school students in the

Particular lenience will be shown
HAVANA to out of town students. Inasmuch
Never before has the United States as the Ann Arbor boys get all the
sent to the Pan-American conference breaks on the auto ban, the rest of usI
so distinguished a delegation as the ought to make it up this way.I
one which is at present attending the * * *t
sessions at Havana, Cuba. In addi- For instance, all students who are
tion to President Coolidge, our most not in town during vacations will not
astute statesman, Charles Evans be required to eat their meals at thet
Hughes, and our secretary of state, University. As a special concession,
Frank Kellogg, are present, demon- in exceptional and extraordinaryt
strating, if it need demonstration, the cases, we may even permit a few to
tremendous moment which the Wash- eat whenever they please.
ington government attaches to the * * *
business to be transacted. MARRIED STUIDENTS TOI
It is very apparent that there will GET THEIR DESSERTSI
be opposition to the "imperialistic" Ordinarily the rules will be relaxedY
policy of the United States at the only in the case of married students.
. conference, and there is not the They will be required to eat two meals
slightest doubt but what the "Colossus at one time.
v of the North" faces considerable op- * * *
position. By far the great majority In order to keep up the intellectualt
r of delegates, nevertheless, are bound atmosphere and the true University
t to be sanely conservative, and are spirit, only Phi Beta students will be
bound to see that without capital qualified to serve as waiters.
from the United States South America Alaba Rococo.
cannot achieve any rapid develop--
ment. RLS N;UCS
The United States, nevertheless, ROLLS ANNOUNCES
should religiously avoid any attitude The Featuie Production of the
which can be interpreted as haughty. "ER
If the Pan-American confederation is
to succeed, its members must be treat- A Roll's Own Serial
ed as equal partners in a great enter- Perpetrated by Poison Ivy
prise, even though leadership, sug- Begins Tomorow.
- gestion, and even defense at times
must come from the United States. It CHICAGO 31YSTERY SOLVEI
is an inspiring prospective-this ideal Again Roll's own private detective
of international cooperation extending force has triumphed. Miss Royden's
from Maine to the Straits of Magellan, Chicago lecture was cancelled because
and it is an ideal of international she smokes ENGLISH cigarettes.
friendship which seems closer to re- * * *
alization than any scheme of inter- AND STILL THEY WONDER
- national friendship ever promoted in An editorial in the Ann Arbor
e the history of mankind. News wonders at Hickman's depravity.
Our Latin-American neighbors must They also give a list of his High
S always bear in mind the fact that the school offices and distinctions.
great resources and powerful position The third office he held was Stu-
e of the United States entitles her by dent Councilman.
the nature of the case to some small
prerogative in the program to be fol- WEATER JIREAL-
lowed; but the United States on the W tht: nulEAUg
other hand, must remember that it isP Weather toght: Insulting.
the right of a sovereign people to * * y
- choose their form of government even 1 THE PRINCE OF THEM ALL
if that form of government be com-
s munism. As a speial feature, we have se
It is by this course, and by this cured an interview with a good
course only, that the gr dfriend, Mayor Thompson of Chicago,
o lye great dream of on the automobile ban.
t unity throughout all America can be , ~ *
accomplished; and it is to this course The Mayor greeted us with a grin
that the Havana conference must lead, that helped him to get in the position
i Friendship, amity, cooperation - the to be what he is today. As we were,
- golden dream of international rela- ushered into the office, he exclaimed
- tions-all are possible in this New heartily, "Wie geht's?",,
World of ours, and may no pharisee * * *
arise to inject a note of discord into That almost stopped the party, but
t the harmony of the scene. The ideal fortunately we remembered a little
of Pan-Americanism, fostered and language too, so we shot back "Pas
nurtured through tender years of trop mal." Then we added, "Why all
adolescence, appears at last to be in the Deutch, Mayor?"
a position to come into its own, and it * * *
is to be sincerely hoped that the The hair on the back of his neck
Havana conference will sl further went up like a flash. Muttering '
1 promote the work which has thus far ferociously, he pointed to a sign en-
been so successfully achieved. graved upon the desk. "No English
Spoken Here.
REAL SERVICE * * *
Elsewhere in these columns appears We had trouble with the German
an account of Dr. Grenfell's lecture, until the mayor found we went to
but no mere account of what he said, O lge. Then he told us to slip back
Sevenif it could be as glowing as his into our own language, because we
own words, could possibly do justice couldn't speak English if we tried.
to the man.
Dr. Grenfell's accomplishments in But to get back to the car ban, the
Labrador are the first mark of the Mayor declared that any young whip-
ersnapers who put English on a
great man. He has not been content ba didn't have ens ough
simply to carry the science of healing dea ilave sense enough
to the ignorant inhabitants of that to drive automobilesr
country, though that alone would be Gargantua.
more than enough to occupy the ener- The above material was selected,
gies of a natural lifetime, but he has and occasionally revamped, from the,
provided education for their children, contributions sent in by those who are
an industrial economy adapted to foolish enough to want this job for
Labrador conditions, and prosperity to 1
ynext semestr r

a region formerly exploited and im- Benjamin Bolt.
poverished. And now he is busyI
creating an endowment fund, so that unselfishness a re the outward signs?
when he has to pass the torch to of an inward grace truly Christ--likeT
some one else, his five hospitals and in its qualities.r
the spirit of his great work may not Those who heard him Sunday at St.

"Icebound" will be produced some
time next semester, and several other
titles which have been tentatively se-
lected include "The Devil's Desciple"
and "They Knew What They Wanted,"
another Pulitzer Prize play.
* * *
THE FACULTY CONCERT
A review, by Vincent Wall
Shortly after the sternly classic
phrase and sonorous grandeur of the
Beethoven Fifth had died away, and -
the applause occasioned thereby had
subsided, the concert really began.
I wish that I knew Grieg A minor
Concerto, which Mrs. Okkelberg play-~
ed with the orchestra, sufficiently well
to describe it in detail. But as it is
only the few hundred people who at-
tended the Faculty Concert Sunday
afternoon can appreciate the inter-.
pretation which Mr. Lockwood and
Mrs. Okkelberg gave it. It must re-
main a success d'estime-but as such
it was one of the most vital and in-
spiring moments in the musical sea-
son.
It begins with a long roll from the
tympani and a few octave scales for I
the piano. From there it passes from
the most ecstatic lyricism to the ro-
mantic flush of outpouring passion,
Grieg was a fresco painter, handling
his brush with furious energy, magni-
licence, and dramatic intensity. Be-
side his vast and tremendous scenery,
the music of Mehul and Mendelssohn,1
and even Beethoven is all brown, all
gray, all darkness and sometimes
small.
But it was not Grieg's triumph. For
without Mrs. Okkelberg's artistry,
there might have been moments that
verged on the artificial. Her tech-
nique was smooth without being
mechanical Her forte passages
were given clearly but without
too great emphasis . Her legato
was simply executed with per-
feet restraint. In short, her perform-
ance was professional from beginning
to end, and something worthy of being
repeated if the occasion presents itself
at any time during the year.
* * *
THE ROC1KFORD PLAYERS
Opening with "The Thirteenth
Chair" next Sunday night in the
Whitney theater, the Rockford Players
have a schedule that it is interesting
and more. The plays are popular-a
few just a bit too popular-but they
are all of interest and are successes.
The players have been together
some eighty weeks, and have as their
center point Mrs. Mansfield, of. the
vibrant voice and legends of the thea-
ter of the nebulous nineties, togeter
with Charles Warburton, director and
actor in the Memorial theater at
Stratford-on-Avon, and Elsie Herndon
Kearns, Walter Hampden's leading
lady.
These with Frances Dade of Holly-
wood and the cinema, the English
Velma Royton from Boston, Robert
Henderson of hectic memories as di-
rector and occasionally in leads, and
Holman Faust and Franz Rothe as
juveniles, comprises the company
which is now rehearsing in the dusty,
"theater" atmosphere of the Whitney.
The fat cupids above the proscenium
are >eing polished off, there will be a
tuxedoed jazz orchestra in the pit-in
place of the classic ensemble of other
generations!-and the curtain will
rise next week on this company that
is returning to Ann Arbor, with the
fruits of three crowded seasons-with
So many of the town and gown look-
ing forward to it as a little gayer and
a little smarter than any that have
gone before.
* * .
In "Rosalie" Mr. Ziegfeld has found

a successor to the "Follies" in the
New Amsterdam theater which should
be equally popular. That latter en- 1
tertainment of All-American glorifieds
has gone out to instruct and amuse
the provinces.
And at that "Showboat" seems to be
Mr. Ziegfeld's triumph of the season.
laving succeeded "Rio Rita" at his j
new theater, it is the most talked of
musical show in town.

Detroit Theaters
. "a~a.aasaa0aaaaaaaaaa easa p

-.
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CAS S THEATRE
Mat, $1.00 to $2.50
Nights, $1 to $3.50
SCHWAB & MANDEL Present
"GOOD NEWS"
Forty Flapper Freshies
ABE LYMAN (Himself)
and His t.° t

uE t+ t
M
aN
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MYt
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flIl(l Ills ill ht>.tm hi

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CLASSIFIED ADS BRING
SATISFACTION

LI

Woodward, at Eliot
PLAYHOUSE
NIGHTS, 75c, $10. Mats. r1TIes.,
Thurs. and Sat., i()c, 75c
A FUNNY td1OW
Sa" oJaJey s ew onk Wow
"Loose Ankles"

i

I SERVICE
Come in and examine

PIV.

I

Shubert-Lafayette
Br~lllg nn Sun~day, Jan. SOl,
THE SPIDER
l t ., Thurs. ani. Sat.
Price : E eninigs, 5e to $25.
PoIular iMt rI hII°.s, 'Oe to
Saturday Iatiee, , )- tot $2.T)
(Plus Tax)

I

THE NEW PORTABLE
We are having a wonderful sale on this Champion of
all portables. "Everybody wants one." Anyone can
quickly learn to use one. It is a time saver and time is
money. Themes should be typed-Theses must be.

CLASSIFIED
ADS PAY

- RAE
1TODAY AND WEDNESDAY
PATSY RUTH MILLER
IN
"HELL BENT
FOR HEAVEN"
Lupino Lane Comedy
Ths "Ad" with 10c
R RAE

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Rider's PnSo
Authorized Dealers. Complete typewriter
EM S E R V ICE pg

service.

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MICHIGAN PINS
FOUNTAIN PENS
ALARM CLOCKS
HALLER'S
STATE ST. JEWELRS

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IfI II I I l I t t I I l 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 H 11' 1 1 l 1 1 1 i l l1

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University SchoW f
Second Semester Begins Feb.

Degree and Certificate
Candidates

Courses for those who are
for Graduation

GENERAL COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
EARL V. MOORE, MUSICAL DIRECTOR

BYIM FIOX I3BaIIE , Solfeggio
GL.EANNCARISCI-iN, Sociolo-Y
PALMER CHIRIS4TIAN, Organ
DONNA1 ISSELSTYN, Pian.o
NICIOL~A S FALCON E, Baind Instruments
MARBIAN erS'jUjj FREEMWAN, Violin ,
l111JE GBRA IyIAIII, P'hto
R, T. i.MOM11. SE ,Public Speaking
NORA CRANE hNTVoice
Gll CE .l{3 I N e N hAJ(OL F, Voice
, AIWRT L t ohiwODl), Piao

GLENN MCGEOCII, History
MIIGARE' MacGREGOR, Organ
JOSEPH E. MADIY, IMethods
GUY )IAIER, Piano
1,LS MAIER, Piano
MARTA ME I YXI, Pian o
HATI) OKKELBEIIR, Piano
LIA PA EN'T, French
MABEL ROSS RH-E:AP), Piano
LEON' SLATER, P clwoigy
HELEN SNYDER, llhetoric
OTTO J. STAhL, Pianao and Theory
NELL I. ST'OC i KWE LL, Piano
1T AY A. STRON, 4Voice
W A L'ER W E Lo c, Me hod
N(IIA B. WETMlOiE~ Voice

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