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April 05, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


T

NAME HOOVER, SMITH
IN COUNTRYWIDE VOTE

Lowers Air Postage
By Writing New Law

ltesults Of Unihersity Balloting
A nnIOIufnced By Independent
MagaziS B
HOOVER LEADS BY 9,

Are

00

MORE THAN HUNDRED NEWSPAPERS
BOUND, FILED FOR LIBRARY STACKS
With the exception of one or two brary for the newspaper files it was
binderies, the University does - the thought that three and one quarter
largest amount of newspaper binding .
in the country. More than 100 news mhes would be sufficient for a six
papers are covered and filed for per- month volume. Since that time the
manent books in the library news- papers have increased to such an
paper stacks, according to William C. extent that today the New York Times
Hollands, superintendent of printing is bound twice a month. The stacks
and binding. have adjustable shelves and varied
This large amount is due to a ruling size books can be filed. Papers are
by the Board of Regents several years bound according to their thickness,
ago which demanded that every news- some every month, six weeks, up to
paper that is received by the library jsix months.
must be bound. The newspaper; Accommodations of two stack rooms
which come to the library are a se- have been made for the newspapers,
lected -list of the metropolitan news- but there are still thousands of cop-
papers of which; one Lansing, one ies waiting to be bound. Recently the
Grad Rapids, and two Detroit pa- Ryerson Public library, Grand Ra-
pers are included. pids, sent a complete collection of
When space was allotted in the li- old, newspaper files to the libraiy.

BOSTON, April 4--Herbert Hoover
and Gov. Al Smith of New York ap-
peared as the favorite candidates for
lresidert in th~e country-wide uni-
versity ballot. The Independent, a na-
tional weekly, announced the results
which showed that the Secretary of
Commerce alone, with 22,086 votes.
was awarded almost half the under-
graduate and faculty total in 39 col-
leges and universities.
Smith followed second with a total
of 13,534. Reed was runner up to the
Democratic leader, Dawes and Lowden
came second and third among the
Republican candidates. The 10 men,
five Democrats and five Republicans
chosen to appear on the ballots re-
ceived in all 46,879 votes.
Of those not on the ballots Borah,
Hughes, and President Coolidge re-
ceived a considerable number of
votes, while among those mentioned
were Will Rogers, Aimee Semple Me-
Pherson, "Big Bill" Thompson, Lind-
bergh, Norman Thomas, Senator Hef-i
lin of Alabama, and President Butler
Cf Columbia.I
Among the universities that report-1
ed, Michigan cast 2,540 for Hoover,l
and 728 fcr Smith; Harvard gave1
Secretary Hoover 1,841 votes andf
Smith received 1,380; at Princeton,t
Hoover received 742. and Smith 25(;

Rep. Clyde Kelly
Republican, Pennsylvania, who is
,author and sponsor of the new airmail I
law which passed the house by a
unanimous vote,
LEAGUE PLANS DISCUSSION
"What is Industrial Democracy?"
is the topic for. discussion at the
meeting of the League for Industrial
Democracy tonight, which is to be
held at 8 o'clock at the Labor Tem-
ple, 207 East Washington. Professor
Lowell J. Carr, of the sociology de-
partment, will address the meeting on
the problem, and will lead the general
discussion which will follow. -

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