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April 04, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-04-04

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APRIL 4, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WASVKE IS APPOINIED PROFESSOR MITCHELL RETURNS FROM JOURNEY
THROUGH SOUTHERN STATES ON SPEAKING TOUR

As the reult of a need for sum-
mer intramural activity at the Uni-
versity, the Summer Session has an-
nounced that Paul R. Washke, in-
structor in 'physical education, has
been engaged for the session of 1928

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to organize summer miramural ac-
tivity. Waske is now in the same
work with the regular intramural
department.
This is the first attempt upon the
part of the University to sponsor
summer intramural programs, and the
work here next summer will be partly
experiirmental in finding what the
Summer Session students enjoy and
desire to play most. It is expected
that several tournaments will be pre-
moted, including ones in regular
baseball, soft baseball, tennis, volley-
ball, golf, squash, and swimming,

Prof. Elmer D. Mitchell of the
Physical Education faculty has re-
cently returned from a week's trip
in the South vhere he delivered two
ad iesses 1efore teachers' gatherings
in lirmuingliani, Ala; and where he
had chance to observe the intra-
mural facilities and activities in sev-
eral southern schools. Last Thurs-
day afternoon, Professor Mitchell ad-I
dressed a physical education .groupl
on "The Newer Objectives of PhysicalI
Education," and on Friday morning,
he spoke before the Alabanma highl
school association, whose member-
ship is composed of principals, facul-
ty athletic managers, and coaches,
on the subject of "Expanding the
Athletic Program."
According to Mitchell, there is a
very keen interest in athletics in the
southland; especially so at the pres-
ent time in methods of introducing
programs of "athletics for all," into
the schools. The eagerness to intro-

duce intramural programs is handi-
capped, however, almost everywhere
by the meagerness of facilities and
equipment. Only in the very largest
cities, such as Birmingham, are gym-
nasiums available, and for the most
part, basketball is played upon out-
door courts, m-any of which have only
a clay surface and two posts hold-
ing the baskets placed at either end
of the court. Much experimenting is
now being done, however, with types
of surfacing that will stand up un-
der intensive use.
In Aabama, a great amount of
valuable recreation work is being
promoted by the welfare department
of a large industrial corporation, the'
Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railway
company. This corporation conducts
athletic leagues, community centers,'

the Boy and Girl Scout troops, for
its employees and their children.
Through its large assets, it is able
to provide beffer and more complete
facilities and direction of activities
than can the public schools.
Among the other things which
Professor Mitchell noted in his trip
was the popularity of baseball, which
he says apparently has not lost
ground as it has done in the North.
Games of hard baseball are played on
most every corner lot, amateur teams
are numerous, and the ganme has a
strong foothold in the colleges. The
colleges are very proud of the men
whom they have: -sent to the big
leagues, and Mitchell says that they
do not forget these men or their
records in the big circuits.

INDUSTRIAL FILMS
TO BE CONTINUED
Three pictures will be presented
at 4:15 o'clock today in Natural
Science auditorium by the School of
BusinessaAdmintstration on its sixth
program of industrial films. They
are, "Carpeting a Century, the Man-
ufacture of Carpets," "The Miracle of
Your Table; the Alaska Salmon In-
dustry," and "American Bottles Old
and New; the Manufacture of Owens
Glass Bottles."
These films are a continuation of
the series inaugurated this year by
the business school.

MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW
EUROPE, ORIENTGR
ANYWHERE
N{S E MSHEUs
NY UERCLASS S
TAEESCH[QUES. ETC.
E.G.Kucbir, Steamship Age,.
Ucsed&BuHour. 01 .Huro n

for I adBtrt
Weber's and Bunte's,

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Coronta, nder
Rerndigton, IL
We have all w
Some in colored duco finishe
0. D. MORRIL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone

II

Again Ready

to Serve You?1

,1

Claude Brown II

CHOCOLATES
In Easter Boxes

L A

DRUGS

KODAKS

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>

Wd eyer
RADIO SERV ICE
We Service and Repair All Makes, Including Electric
10 E. WASHINGTON PHONE 3694

1

Is I buslness agan at 11.r E.
Ann St. in The Store iiitii the
Red Front.
WE GUARANTEE THE
HWHEST CASH PRICES
FOR USED CLOTHES
Phone Calls Glven Prompt
Attention,
NEW AND USED MLOTHING
FOR SALE

I

Chocolate Eggs, Rabbits and Novelties
THE MAX ROY
Under theMichigan Theatre Sign

''; <4

Spring Clean-Up
During Vacation
AIDS
Sponges, Chamois, Silver Polish, Muriatic
Acid, Ammonia, etc.
JOHNSON DE LUXE WAXER
Rented at $2.00 a Day
JOHNSON ELECTRIC JOHN SON'S
FLOOR PO"SHERS pas"e -"Liu0d -powdered
---POLISHING
Formerly $42.50

If

.

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PHONE 8339

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,. kti ,

Now $29.50
1928 Model

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Is just the thing for polishing ail your
furniture, wocatwork, floors and linoleum.
It, covers up small surface mars and pre-
vents. checking.' Imparts a delightful air
of immaculate cleanirness wherever used,
75c .ottle
Liquid Wax
br_

Polish your floors by electricity
with this wonderful new machine.
It eliminates all hard work and
polishes floors and linoleum ten times
faster and better than is possible
by'hand. Butt to last a lifetime.-

85o Canof
Paste Waxr

Calkins-FIetcher brug Co.
3 Dependable Stores
We have served Michigan and her students for 40 years
SODAS CANDY
1 I/ IO
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TOPCOATS

- - I e -rf ii

of

Ann Arbor 's Finest Men' Shop

World-Famed

SPRING

Harris

Tweed

$2

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Even matter-of-fact business has its dash of romance. The
fame of Harris Tweed Top Coatings girdles the globe.
They are woven by the Crofters who dwell upon the
cliff-cleft islands and islets off the North Coast of Scot-
land-the Orkneys and the Shetlands.
Every yard of Harris Tweed Top Coatings is slowly
loomed by hand, not raced and chased through a machine. .
The Crofter signs'his name upon the ticket of each piece as
assurance of itq genuineness and as evidence of the pride
he takes in skill handed down from, sire to son.
Spring Top Coats of genuine Harris Tweeds, tailored in
accordance with our inflexibly fine standards, are priced
at $42.00.
Pattern-effects personally selected by us from Great Britain
and exclusive with us in Ann Arbor.

C4).lV-uQ-c;t

ApbL
%-%f A
100-% --A-
tz>p AAJL ,

~TW~W-.

W ereverlyoug.go-on campus
ground - at . football game,- in
snappy roadster-no,matterfwhat
outdoor activity-there you will see
Sawyer's Slickers - the'unfailing
choice of collegiate style ' setters
throughout the country. Distinc
tively cut, Sawyer's Slickers not
only look well but give absolute pro-
tection against rain,sleet and snow.

WtuIf~tk

ANN ARBOR
AT 336 SOUTh STATE STREET

4N
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FEU

Sawyer's Slickers are =obtain-
able at men's stores, haber-
,1 nharc and dna jrntmn't stores.

I

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