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March 28, 1928 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-28

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8 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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COMPETITIO CASE
MASQUES TO DISBIAND
Provisions Are Made For Re-Forma-
tion Of Club In Future, In
Case Demand Arises
CLUB KEEPS TRADITIONS
Membersof Masques, campus dra-
matic society for women, voted in
a meeting yesterday afternoon to dis-
band unconditionally while the tradi-
tion of the organization still lives,
rather than to carry on and lose the
reputation which Masques has built
for itself in the past. The members
of Masques have found it financially
impossible to continue doing work of
the standard which they have set
for themselves, and they would rather

First Woman Lawyer In This Country
Is Graduate Of University Of Michigan

not support an unsatisfactory organ-
ization.
Most of the dramatic work done
now is open to the entire campus,
and° the women find it hard to do
convincing work. The competition of
Mimes and the Play Production plays
have left little place for Masques:
After the completion of the audi-
torium wing of the Women's league
building, there may again be a d*
mand for a women's dramatic organ-
ization which can give public per-
formances, and provisions have been
made by the present mmbers of
Masques for its re-formation. A com-
mittee will be appointed and asked
to keep a copy of the constitution
and requirements for membership,
so that the traditions and prestige of
Masques will not disappear. The
varied activities and work of Masques
may be takenup magain if ten women
petition this committee, and obtain
the sanction of a faculty member
who is a dramatic critic. This faculty
member will be named soon.
Members of Masques state that
they find it hard to break up the
tradition whicharwas started in 1915,
with Prof. J. Rawley Nelson as the
first director. Prof. Nelson continued
to direct the productions of the group
until 1924, and during these years
Masques productions were noted for
the perfection sas to detail and elabor-
ate asettings. The last play to be
presented in Hill Auditorium was al-
so one of the last to be directed by
Prof. Nelson; namely, "Bonds of In-
terest," by Benevente. After 1924
Masques gave contributions to the
Women's League through the profits
from productions.
Masques has always been interested
in the educational aspect of amateur
dramatics, and in order that the
members might have a better chan.
of taking active part in the work
of the club, membership has been lim-
ited to 50. It has been the aim of
Masques to contribute to the Univer-
sity program each year, in addition
to a series of one-act plays, one large
play presented with consientlous at-
tention to detail, business as well as
artistic. Such large numbers of try-.
outs have presented themselves each
year that only the most. talented
women on the campus have been
privileged. to belong to Masques.,

Sarah Kilgore Wertman, '71L, is one
of the most interesting feminine fig-
ures in the history of the University.
Mrs. Wertman was born March 1,I
1843 in Jefferson, Ind. Beside being
one of the first woman to receive any
degree, she ha.s the distinction of
being the first woman to graduate
from the Law school here. She is the
first woman to be admitted to prac-
tice before the Supreme Court of
Michigan, and the first woman in the
United States to practice law.
Before entering the Law school Mrs.
Wertman had ahliberal and extensive
education. She gradu tepd from
Ladoga Seminary in 1862. For the
next few years she taught school in
Chicago, entering the Law school in
Chicago in 1869.
Soon afterwards the University of
Michigan opened her doors to women
students, and, since it was more con-
venient for her, she completed her
studies at Michigan. She was delayed
from taking up practice immediately
afterwards because-of illness.
Sarah Kilgore Wertman wals
married to Jacksop Wertman, a prac-
J1cin8g 5at orn ey e6Indianapol on
June k6,' 1875. She was prohibited
from practicing law in Indiana due
to a clause which ran "male citizens
of good moral character." Neverthe-
less she continued her career by work-
ing in the office..
I'n November 1878 they moved to
Men Can Attend All
League Bridge Teas
The series !of Bridge teas to be held
March 31 which the Women's league is'
sponsoring under the direction of the
Undergraduate Campaign committee
marks the adoption of a new plan this
year in the granting of permission of
guests whichr"theyare allowing the
women to have at their teas. This
year all women on campus whio are
acting as hostesses at any tea, are be-
ing given the permission to ask men
as their guests to any tea. This plan
has never been adopted before and it
i's hoped that. the, number of guests?
will be incre&sed at every house on'
campus where teas are being held and
that the plan will be so successful
that it will be carried out every year
henceforth when these teas are held.
The teas are to be held at every
sortority and dormitory on campus.
Playing w4ll begin at 2 o'clock and
will continue until- 5 o'clock. The
charge to play is 75 cents per person
or for one woman making up a tablet
the cost will be $3. There ha's been
no plan made for teas being held atl
any of the league Mouses on campus
however if any single house desires
to have a tea or wishes to hold a tea
in cooperation with another it may do
so by making arrangements with Mar-
garet Bush, '30, who is in charge of
all the teas to be held Saturday. She
may be reached by calling 7817.

Ashland, O., and as soon as the care
of her two children permitted, she re-
sumed her profession. She. was ad-
mitted to the Ohio Bar at Columbusain
1893, and -she began practicing law and
the business of abstracting with her
husband.
Many years later, after having re-
sided and practiced in Toledo, Mrs.
Wertman and her husband followed
their children wvest. Her husband died
in 1909, and since then she has lived
near her son, who has a. fruit farm in
Yakima valley, Washington. Although
85 years of age she is still active and
well informed.
NEED MUSICIANS
FOR DANCE DRAMA
First year women who are inter-
est ed in writing music for the lyrics
of the Freshman Pageant are urged
to notify the chairman of the music
committee, according to an announce-
ment made at the meeting of commit-
tee chairman yesterday afternoon at
Barb<)ur gymnasium, at which Miss
Grace Richards, adviser of women, as-
sisted the members of the central
committee in planning their activities
and in getting their work in progresi
before the spring recess.
Several lyrics, as well as the pro-
logue of the pageant which is based
upon the Greek mythical story of the
romance of the maiden, Persiphone,
have been written by Louise Auble,
'31. It will be necessary that music
be oomposed for the lyrics, and any-
one having experience in writing
music compositions or interested in
entering this part of the pageant work
are requested to call Ruth Marshall,'
chairman of music, at Betsy Barboor
house, 21616. All music must be com-
pleted and turned in to the commit-
tee on or before Friday, April 6.
ALUMNAE COUNCIL,
DISCUSSES PLANS
OF NEWBUILDING
A special meeting of the board of
directors of the Alumnaetcouncil was
held Monday afternoon to consider
questions concerning the league build-
ing, with special reference to plans
for laying the cornerstone.
The executives, with Mrs. Arthur
Vandenberg, Mrs. Harriet Oakes of
Cleveand, Miss Rose Ander)n of
Toledo, Mrs. Ralph Holmes of Battle.
Creek, and Miss Emily Sargent of the
Detroit group of Michigan women, act-
ing as alternate for Mrs. Arthur Col-
ton, the regular board member, were
present at the meeting. Mrs. Sara
Wheedon, corresponding secretary,
did riot attend as she is spending the
winter in -"Florida..

S P C
Daily Bullet
AMERICAN WOME)
EVENTS IN THE
American wcmen are scheduled
compete in the five events open
women in the 1928 Olympic gain
However, although our athletes n
be very good, they have little char.
of winning any of these events,.in cc
sidering the trials made in Amer
and Europe to date. The events
girls are the 100 meter dash, the
meter run, the 400 meter relay,t
discus throw, and the high jump.
The best record turned in so far
an American woman for the 100 is
2-5 seconds, made by. Helen Filkey
Chicago. However, there are thi
women outside the United States, t
Canadians and a German. wxho ha
bettered her fast time, and four o
ers who have equalled it. Therefo
if the Olympic 100 meters is run tt
to form, America can not hopef
better than fourth place. Americ
fastest relay team has a record whi
has been beaten by English, Canadi,
and Finnish teams.
Four German girl's have thrown t
discus from 107 to 125 feet, while t
best Lillian Copeland, the Americ
titleholder, can do in competition
103 feet. It must be taken ino cc
sideration that this record was ma
several months ago and that sir
then, Miss Copeland has been throwi
as far as 112 feet. Also the Americ

Social Service Work
R T S Is Policy In Vienna
tin of Sportswomen At the March meeting of the Wom-
en's Research club, Dr. Martha
N WILL ENTER FIVE Guernsey gave an account of the social
1928 OL YMPIC GAMES service program of the city of Vienna,
put into effect by the Social Demo-
to discus is half a pound heavier than the cratic party immediately after the
to European one, In the high jump there war. The whole program of the or-
es. are five American women who rank ganization is based on the family as
nay two or three inches behind the Eng- I the biological unit, as shown by its
nce lishi title holder. slogan, "Evolution not Revolution."
on- So if the girls hold up to their best Its departments are all correlated, and
Ica performances in the Olympics, the under the guidance of members of the
for best finish in all these events would faculty of the University of Vienna.
800 be: 100 meters-fourth, 800 meters- The political character of the organ-
the nowhere, 400 meter relay-fourth, ization is a unique feature for the
discus-fifth, and high jump-third, party is supported by taxation, mostly
by l on property.
11 Classes To Meet Dr. Guernsey has had ample oppor-
oft fnty to bhav tha atnivn

NOTICES

FANCY DRESS PARTY

K
F

ree {
w o
ave
th-
re,
~a's
ich
an,
the
the
:an
is
ole
nce
ing
,an

At Field House)

WOMAN CONTENDS
FOR BOA'T TROPHY
Gar Wood and others who would de-
fend the Harmsworth trophy from the
Eng.Msb, wii be forc:ed to contend
with a woman this year. A challenge
has been sent by Miss Marian Bar-.
boara Carstairs, who hopes to be able
to return the cup to England where it
khas not been for two years. As well
as the boat races, hydroplane races
will be held at the same, tinie, one
of the English entries also being sent
by Miss Carsta.irs.
This race should excite great na-
tioial interest, for the winner is able
to claim the world's fa:stest airplane
and the fastest motor boat. The boat
that wins the race this year will have
to be capable of at least 85 miles per
hour. The builder, of the boat that
won the trophy last year, an American,
states that he sees no reason why a
boat cannot be built capable of at-
taining 100 miles per hour, which is
20 miles per hour faster than the
record held by the Miss America II,
last year's winner.

All interior furnishings for the new.
Women's field house have so nearly
been completed that after the spring
vacation all women's field classes in
physical education will be held there
instead of in Barbour gymnasium, ac-
cording to a statement isued yester-
day by Irving W. Truettner, mainten-
ance inspector of the Buildings and
Grouinds department. Within the last
few dlays the rifle range has been
completed and the building furnished
with soap boxes and towel racks. In-
stallation of an electric stove and
laying of a linoleum floor will com-
plete the building Mr. Truettner said
Miss Laurie E. Campbell, of the
physical education department, is to
be in charge of all classes in the new
building.
ALPHA EPSILON PHI WINS
FROM ALPHAOMICRON PI
In the Intramural baseball game
scheduled for 4 o'clock last Monday
in Barbour gymnasium, Hillel founda-
tion defaulted to Pi Beta Phi. At 5
o'cl ock Alpha Omicron Pi and Alpha
E~psilon. Phi played an exciting game
which resulted in the score of 13-12
in favor of the latter. At the begin-
ning of the game Alpha Omic on Pi
had the leading score, but at the
second inning, the two teams were
1 tied.

(tSororities,' dormitsories, and
other organizations which are
plannin'g to take part in the an-
nual Fancy Dress party of the
Women's league on March 31,
(are remiinded that the time is S
o'clock, and the place Barbour
( gymnasium. During the evening
a fashion show, by Jacobsen's,
will be given in Sara Caswell
Angell hall, andtthe four classes
(will give stunts. Sports cos-
( tumes, sports decorations, and
( sports refreshments will rule the
( day.
Mummer's will meet at Alpha ]
Delta at 4 o'clock this afternoon.
Chi Delta Phi will meet Thursda
instead of Wednesday night at Adel
Cheever at 7:30 o'clock.
For the benefit of all college wome
and others who may be interested i
going to a. summer camp this yea
Miss Lotta Broadbridge, '26, will be
the Pi Beta Phi house tonight
show moving pictures of Camp Bry
Afton.
Miss Broadbridge, with Mr. and Mr
Alfred White will be the guest of tI
house for dinner.
The bowling alleys at the field hou
will be open from 4 until 6 every d
for play by anyone who is interest(
in bowling. Tickets may be obtain(
there, oane string for 10 cents:

1:

tuny to o serve t e extensive pro-
gram of the organization, since she
teas just recently returned from the
University of Vienna where the has
been engaged in psychological re-
search. Although the economics of
the movement is questionable and
stifles private business, the expend-
iture of money is very idealistic and
effective. Some concrete results
shown in the city are the beautiful
ultra-modern community apartment
houses recently erected.
NOTICES
All junior women interested in golf
are asked to attend a meeting at 3:30
o'clock today in Barbour gyminasium.

f

I

SPECIAL EXHIBITION OF
ANTIQUE HOOKED RUGS
Collected by Jane K. Miller

ANTIQUE JEWELRY,
FABRICS AND

BRASS AND COPPER
EMBROIDERIES

March 26 to 31st

at the HOUSE OF ART
of James Foster
213 South State

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