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March 28, 1928 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Published every morning except Monday
during the Universit year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.,
Subscription by' carrier, $4.00; by mail,
4Ofices:Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
lard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor...................Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor..............Philip C. Brooks
City Editot........... .Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor..........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor...........Herbert E. Vedder
rhteater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
4ssistant City Editor.... Richard. C. Kurvink'
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch Ed.Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G.'Patrick
Paul J, Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson lohn H. Maloney
;Margaret Arthur Marion McDonald
\iex A. lochnowski Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Church Harold L. Passman
Blanchard W. Cleland Morris W. Quinn
Clarence N." Edelson Rita Rosenthal
Margaret Gross Pierce Rosenberg
Valborg Egeland Eleanor Scribner
N'arjorie Fllmer Corinne Schwarz
James B. Freeman Robert G. Silbar
Robert J. Gessner Howard F. Simon
Cilaine E. Gruber George E. Simons
:Aice flagelshaw Rowena Stillman
Joseph E. Howell Sylvia Stone
J. Wallace Hushen George Tilley
Charles R. Kaufman Bert, K. Tritscheller
William F. Kerby Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Cawrence R. Klein Benjamin S. Washer
Donald J. Kline Leo J. Yoedicke
Sally Knox Joseph Zwerdling
'ack L. Lait, Jr.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone -21214 .
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, jr.
Advertising....,.........Richard A. Meyw
Advertising............Edward L. Hulse
Advertising...........John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts............. .Raymond Wachter
Circulation...... ... ..George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication.................Harvey Talcott
Assistants'

George Bradley,
Marie Brummeler
.ames Carpenter
Charles K. Correll
Barbara Cromel!
Mary Dively
Bessie V. Egeland
Ona Felker
Katherine Frohne
Douglass Fuller
Beatrice Greenberg
.lelen Gross
E. J. Hammer
Carl W. Hammer

Ray Hofelich
Hal A. Jaehn
J.ames Jordan
arion Kerr
Thales N. Lenington
Catherine McKinven
Dorothy Lyons
Alex K. Scherer
George Spater
Ruth Thompson
Herbert E. Varnumn
Lawrence Walkley
Hannah Wallen

fairly well, at least when the most
deserving candidate can corral the
most votes, but in a critical situation,
when able leadership is most needed,
it is most likely to break down, for
there is no assurance that the ablest
man will receive the position.
It is a problem which has been al-
lowed to exist unsolved for years, and
one which even now can admit of a
solution which will go into effect this
year. It is, finally, a problem which
should command the interest of the
student body, and of the board of
governors of the Union itself, for it
is one which has been neglected far
too long.
WELCOME
As an old friend, and a former
resident of Ann Arbor, the University
welcomes this week the return of
Robert Frost, renowned New England
poet, who is making a brief visit here.
Holder of a guest fellowship here for
three years, the poet has not only a
host of literary admirers in the city
but a group of close friends, all of
whom will appreciate the opportunity
to tenew the acquaintanceship which
was theirs.
Mr. Frost, while in residence here,
had a marked influence on the student
efforts in literary lines, aiding them
in manifold ways by consultation, in-
terview, and reading of manuscripts.
Since he left Ann Arbor he has ex-
tended his influence even further by
visiting a number of college and uni-
versity campusses, at each of which
he has interviewed students and aided
them in their work. To expect too
much from the present visit of one
week would be unfair, of course, but
to expect a renewal of the contact
which formerly existed between the
poet and the University, and to ex-
pect, perhaps, to hear Mr. Frost pre--
sent some of his work in readings, are
expectations so attractive as to be
extremely welcome.
1hE RUSSIAN RIDDLE
With, the arrest of German engin-
eers in the Don region of Russia, the
German-Russian business quarrel has
broken out anew. That the rupture
has succeeded in recalling an old fear
is seen in the fact that a German
editor, in stating that the confidence
with which Germany spent large
sums of money in financing Russia
has been badly shaken, also professes
to foresee the exploitation of Russian
resources by American capital.
Inasmuch as English officials had
their troubles with Russian repre-
sentatives in London, and the United
States still refrains from official re-
cognition of the Soviet Union, it may
be assumed that Germany is not
wholly to blame for the current break.
In fact, since she fears American in-
terest in the development of Russian
resources, it is certain that she is
not responsible.
However, in feeling that Russian
resources may be exploited by Ameri-
can capital, Germany is somewhat
premature with her prediction. Ameri-
ca still feels very deeply the repudia-
tion by the Soviet Union of the bond-
edn obligations contracted under the
old Russion regime, and such develop-,
ments can hardly be expected to ma-
terialize until that debt is paid. This1
done, the resources of that. country1
may be developed by American- capital
to the advantage and profit of both1
Russians and Americans.1
Unfortunately, the manner in which
Germany lost confidence in Russian

business methods is characteristic of
the stand which other nations have
found necessary to adopt. While Rus-
sian resources are well worth de-
veloping, progress in this directio"?
cannot be looked for until Russian
business methods are made to appear
less enigmatic and more substantial.
The first task which Russia must ac-
complish is winning back the confi-
dence of the several nations with
which she has had dubious contacts.
Indications are that she still has this
to realize.

I

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PUT-Pu

Not being able to use the car be-
cause of various restrictions, Lichty
has rented a parking space in a tree
until the end of school. In fact, he
is all up in the air over the results
of the contest.
* * *
"I WISHII had won the watch," he
said to a Rolls reporter yesterday,
"because then I would have known
when to get out of the arboretum.
As it is I will have to leave school
if I make use of my prize."
* * *
THE PROUD WINNER of the con-
test is offering a half interest to
anyone who can find a way to get a
permit for the car. This will also
include buying half the gas, accord-
ing to the brilliant cartoonist.
THE BEST WE can see in the, event
is that fate was most unkind. Here
the prize goes to a student who can't
have a car when they'could have just
as well given him a watch so he
would know how much longer he had
to sit in each class and be bored by
professors.
* * *
FLYING THE OCEAN .
THREE BRAVE GERMANS are fly-
ing the ocean. They will make a
better trip than Lindbergh, ABER
NIHT HEUTE.
IT SEEMS THAT the foolish sea-}
son is at hand again and several
aviators are trying to fly across the'
ocean. We would like to do it too,
yes, with Lindbergh as 'pilot, Cham-
Lerlain as assistant and Byrd along
to see that nothing went wrong.
* * *
WASHINGTON ACTIVE
DOWN IN THE capitol city of the
United States several legislators had
a few words to say about the presi-
dency the other day. Someone want-
ed Longworth to be nominated for
president.
NOW THIS FELLOW Longworth
was a son-in-law of President Roose-
velt and as far as we can see that,
is about the only claim he has to 1
being a good president. At present'
he is Speaker of the House and we
all know that one can't talk and be
president. See Coolidge for particu-
lars.

THE
IRONY OF
FATE
DESPITE THE BAN on automo-
biles a promising artist of the Gar-
goyle staff entered College Humor's
contest for the best drawing made
by an undergraduate student. The
first prize being an automobile and
the second a watch our own cartoon-
ist tried to win second place.
* * *
HOWEVER THE FATES were
against him and as was announced
in yesterday's Daily, Lichty, the artist,
won the first prize which is an Essex
speedster.
PARKING SPACE

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 1928
Night Editor-ROBERT E. FINCH
THE MERIT SYSTEM
When one scans the list of the emi-
nently successful enterprises in any
field of human endeavor-business,
industry, government, or education--
he finds the same basic principle un-
derlying them all-the principle of the
merit system. Bringing the picture
closer home, and examining the suc-
cessful enterprises on our own cam-
pus, the same rule holds true, and
the. same principle prevails. The merit
system, applied to student endeavors1
and student interests, keeps each ac'
tivity at a high level, and sets a
uniformly high standard for men en-
gaged in athletics, publication work,
scholarship, &debating, and other
forms of competitive enterprise.
Confronted as the campus is by this,
galaxy of successful endeavors op-
erated on the merit system, it is an
odd and curious anomaly that one of
the largest and most important of all
these activities, the Union, should still
be doddering along with a so-called
democratic system of promotion'
which is as archaic as it. is unfair.'
Among all of the important 'phases
of student enterprise, the Union stands,
alone as an institution where thet
highest' position is not reserved for
the man who most deserves it, and if
there is any single and significant
criticism which can 1le levied against
that organiation, now that the happy I
reorganization of the board of gov-
ernors has been effected, it is this

THE":ATER
BOOKS
TONIGHT: The Rockford Play-
ers present Kenyon Nicholson's
"The Barker" in the Whitney
theater at 8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The 3inmes present
Bernard Shaw's "The Devil's Dis.
ciple" in their theater at 8:30
o'clock.
THE GLEE CLUB AND BAND
CONCERT
The date of the annual Glee Club
and Varsity Band combinea concert
has been changed from Wednesday,
April 4, to Thursday, April 5. Both
organizations are preparing entirely
new programs, and providing musical
saws and sleigh bell solos can be
eliminated, it should prove interest-
ing. They gave quite a nice one last
year.
POST-WAR WINE, ETC.
"WHATEVER WE DO," by Alen
Updegraff; New York: The John Day
Company; 1927; X2.0.
Readers of this novel are forced
to conclude either that Updegraff is
much influenced by Ernest Heming-
way, or else that Parisamericans
ARE drunk all the time. Once more
we see a jolly group of expatriates,
drinking their way all over 'Europe as
fast as they can obtain visas.
"Whatever We Do" is the story
principally 'of a war-gassed Ameri-
can's vacation on the Riviera with
a repressed Missouri girl. Her hus-
band is there too, but she has a
neurosis; she is a-Freud of her hus-
band. A French physician, an 80
million-heiress and a genial middle-
aged American tank are the other
important members of the cast, which
performs for one week straight down
there on the Mediterranean. The war
veteran, who plays a highly sympa-
thetic part, finally does a permanent:
exit; what I mean is, if they .play
next week at Deauville he won't be
with them.
T*e impression I have given is
erroneous, because the novel is
neither trite nor trivial. Updegraff's
apparentdunoriginality isedisslpate!
by his distinguished prose and his
absorbing character studies. The
central characters are pleasingly de-
veloped by a modifled stream of con-
sciousness technique. The author
enters their minds but edits what
goes on to a suffciently communica-
tive degree. The gas-victim's slow
lapse into the unconsciousness which
(in this case) is death, is particularly
well revealed from- within the mind
of the dying man.
The novel has further interest, due
to the philosophical conversations, the
Bacchic wisdom dispensed (yes, that's
from the blurb), and the literary fig-
ures and allusions of the author.
-D. F. Doubleday
"THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE"
A review, by Robert J. Gessner
Mimes has at last presented a
play. We knew they had it in them,
but it took all winter to get it out.
The success ofShaw's play lies in the
fact that all the leads have been, well
asted. Everybody fits into their par-
icular form with something that re-
sembles ease. And hence toe play is
not only comparatively smooth, but

really good.
The women roles seemed to have
been filled with more care and taste
than the mien parts. Lois Porter is
nost effective as a typical Shaw-type
carrying a typical Shaw part. Stel
hardly falters in her presentation of
cult to, portray justly and effectively.
[lorence Tennant is more than natu-
ral, and at times too real for a soror:-
ty co-ed. However; she never let any
other personality enter than that or
[he Puritan minister's' wife, pure and
wholesome. Ruth Fine, as the irregu-
ar child, is especially well casted in
iot only stature but also in ability.
But the men were less fortunate.
Yet there isn't anybody on campusj
who can better fill Tom Dougalis1
hoes as Richard ;Dudgeon. He, alone
>f the men, absorbs his character
w ith a relish. He is spicy and re-
reshing-a true disciple of the devil
timself. Kleutgen has a little diffi-
ulty in getting under way,. but in
[he last two scenes he is the Burgoynb
[hat Shaw wants him to be. But
Pommy Denton is too awkward. He
s the only one .that has been mis-
,asted. As a Mimes actor he should
;o back to the movies. A dark-horse
reshman-Cooper-seems to be some-
what of a find, and shows great pro-
nise. We should see more of him in
he next three years. Hinkley, d:s-
uised as a walrus, does not add to
he aesthetic background of the court-

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Act
5-CN -
I T H AD TO B E G OOD

car7

"The glass of fashion
and the mould of form,
the observed of all
observers"
Maybe Shakespeare, never knew
Coca-Cola. But he couldn't have
written better about it if he had
tried-
8 million a day-Coca-Cola has
made the soda fountain the meeting
place of millions.
The Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Ga.

,AMLET
tIll, Scene 1

: d

What SaepAre D"..
says about Coca-Cola
Delicious and Refreshing

T 0 G ET W 14 E' R'. E

TT 15

L..w-

s<.1 I
TO .ET WHR.

RYTEX POUND PAPERS
1 BOX (72 SHEETS) OF RIPPLE PAPER 2 PACKAGES
(40) OF ENVEL0PES................... ...
1111 South Universit
.... ersiF

- - i.: i

fact.
Campus election, by an all-campus CONFERENCE
vote, would perhaps be an excellent With the calling of Charles Schwab,
means of choosing the University's John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and John
most popular man or woman, but it B. Lewis, head of the mine workers
is hardly a means suited to choosing to the same conference table in Wash-
the most able executive for a large ington the solution of the present
organization when few students can Pennsylvania mining difficulties seems
know the candidates. Recognizing to be considerably closer than it has
this, other large campus enterprises, been at any time during the past
notably the student publications, have four months.
been taken out of the hands of fickle Any attempt to determine the right
popular ballot and placed in the and wrong side of the issue, when the
hands of responsible boards, such as whole situation is as complicated as
the Board in Control of Student Pub- a situation can possibly be, would be
lications. The results, at least in the futile and out of place on the part
case of the publications, speak for of an outsider. To expect results
themselves, for in few universities which will alleviate the rather des-
i, the system of publication manage- perate circumstances of the miners
ment as efficient and satisfactory as from the present conference, however,
here, where a faculty-student board is only just. The interests of capital
holds the reins, are rather completely represented by
.With such an eminently efficient Schwab and Rockefeller, those of
example before them, and such re- labor are in the able hands of John

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SOME DEMOCRAT DOWN in the
Senate took 'a crack at Hoover. It
would seem that the Democrats are
afraid that Hoover will win the inom-
ination and beat any man the older,
party can put in the field.
* * * .
THIS SAME DEMOCRAT claimed
that Hoover was dodging the prohi-
bition question. In our humble opin-
ion the man who can dodge an issue
or question is just about the finest
politician in the world.
* * *
THIS IS WELL illustrated by the
'uestion, "Do you or do you not favor
prohibition?" to which the answer is
"Yes and No." Go at 'em Herbie;, old
boy, don't answer any questions.
* * *
SENIOR CANES
TODAY WE WENT over to order a
senior cane. It seems that these
canes come in several sizes, short and
long. We were debating in our mind
as to the size we wanted when we
were told that there is a full quarter
inch difference in the several sizes.
* * *
WE ARE JUST wondering how a
six foot two senior and ourself, much
smaller, are going to manage. If there
is only 1-4 inch difference in the
canes and the larger one fits the big
boys, ours is going to be like a
crutch.
* * *
G. B. S. ON COLLEGE
SOME FRESHMAN ON campus re-

Where have you
been all your-life?
.... Europe?
For $193.50 you can sail and
return in the modernized
CARMANIA and CARONIA
to Plymouth, Havre, and
London, or in the ci-devant
three-class ships SCYTHIA
and LACONIA to Liverpool
... gateway to picturesque
England...Cathedrals, the
Lakes, the Dukeries, Ox-
ford, Cambridge, London...
Recognizing the justifiable
popularity of tourist travel
among those willing to econ-
omize on the ocean to have
more money to invest in
memories of Europe... we
have taken two new 20,000
tonners the SCYTHIA and
LACONIA from first class
service and made them
Cabin and Tourist Third to
Liverpool... staterooms
'sold up to a few weeks ago
at second cabin rates now
available at Tourist Third
... one of the world's best
steamship bargains.
Dancing to the syncopation
of a college orchestrano feet
have yet resisted.., long-
wide decks on which you
can do your mle... or
work up your back-hand at
deck tennis...or start that
casual conversation which
becomes a tete-a-tete the
third day out ...
And, of course, that well-
considered food ... that
cheerful attendance - you
are traveling Cunard.
C UNA RD
L INE

o mhiand . spread!".
COMES day when your family pry themselves
loose and send you a box of eats... cake four
stories high, turkey, candied) orange peel,
fudge, and other good things.
The cry goes round. Your friends gather.
Wash down the eats with "Canada Dry."
This ginger ale has a delightful flavor .
tang to it . . . dryness . . . sparkle. It has a
subtle gingery flavor because it is made from
pure Jamaica ginger. It contains no capsicum
red pepper). It blends well with other
beverages
CQfANADA DRY,
Reg. U. S. Pat.f.
The Champagne o f inger cAles"
Extract imported from Canada and bottled in the U. S. A. by
Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Incorporated, 25 West 43rd Street, New York, N. Y.
In 'Canada, J. J. MicLaughlin Limited. Established I1840.

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