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March 09, 1928 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-09

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FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGB lrIVB

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1928 X'AGE F~IV~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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ALPHA PHI WINS INTRAl
MEET: P1 BETA PHI9
AND MARTHA COOK

MEET FEATURES FIVE SPEED
EVENTS WITH DIVING AND
RELAY RACES
WINNING SCORE 93 POINTS
Virginia Losee Heads List Of Single
Scores With 28 Poiits; Frances
Seydel Is Second
Alpha Phi won first place with the
high score of 93 points last night in
the most enthusiastic intramural
swimming meet which has ever been
held in the Union pool. Pi Beta Phi
came in second with a score of 65
points and Alpha' Omicron Pi, and
Martha Cook won third and fourth
places with the respective scotem of
57 and 40 points.
Virginia Losee, '30, Pi Beta Phi,
heads the list of individual scores with
2 points, while Frances Seydel, Grad.,
Alpha Phi, came in second with 14
points, and Anna Jane Churchman, '29,
Alpha Phi, and Mary Roach, '30, Alpha
Omicroi Pi, tied for third.
There were five speed events, free
style, elementary back stroke, breast,
under side, and back stroke, besides
the relay and diving events. The first
event, free style was a tie between
Anna Jane Churchman, Alpha Phi, and
Virginia Losee, Pi Beta Phi. The
elementary back stroke was won by
Frances Seydel, Alpha Phi, and the
breast, by Mary Roach, '30, Alpha
Omicron Pi, the under arm side by
Helen Swander, '30, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, and the back stroke also by
Virginia Losee, Pi Beta Pi.
The relay, which was one of the
most exciting events in the entire
n.3et and the one which the spec-
tators surred on theirhrepresenta-
tives the most, was won by Al-
pha Phi in one minute, ten and 9-10
seconds, and Betsy Barbour, Helen
Newberry, and Alpha Omicron P
won the other three places in or-
der.
Back dives,aboth jack knives, and
straight, swan dives, front jack
knives, running fronts, and sand-
ing fronts were all represented in
this last event of the meet, diving.
The judges, Anne Zauer, '29, Nellie
Hoover, '28, and Miss Annis Hall,
physical education instructor, pro-
nounced as winner of this meet Vir-
ginia Losee, '30, Pi Beta Phi with
Florence Holmes, '29, Alpha Phi, se-
DOWN THE DIAGONAL
By The Observer
Seamy sidewalks stare at me. I
cannot avoid their pictures for it seems
that concrete mass and rain are colab-
orating in a project to demand my at-
tention-so fierce is the nearly gravi-
tational force which pulls my eyes
downward to miss the onslaugh of the
storm.
I walk smug in my comfortable pes-
simism. Smiles creep along my
mouthlines and I get the sensation of
a satisfied curl to the fissure of my
lips, because I know that metal
clothe tarnishes, that man's passion
has an ebb-tide version, in short that
even if "your best friend won't tell
you" there are still plenty of enemies.
But these ideas do not come until after
the pleasure, the living-why isn't
that a help?
Pessimism finds my senses agree-
able, because it can be part of me only
through having known, which in itself
calms my spirit, causes me to lift my
head and look out of the tops of my
cheek-bones with the awe of satisfac-
tion.
6. L

MAKE PLANS FOR DIPJR|fT(
MURAL SMMNG ,SENIOR SUPPER ISS rw Uo TELLS s p o
Plans for the Senior Supper, to be Daily Bulletin
held March 19 in the banquet hall D[ANS' CONY[NTION!
o° the Union, are being completed -
under the direction of Margaret Mey- Dr. Ben Wood Of Columbia Stresses
TAKE OTHER E r, e president of the senior ImportanceOfDiane-s A O K W N
class and chairman of the annual
cond. !event. MISS COMIST©CK SPEA;KS iI
Those responsible for the meet's All senior women from all schools SINTRAMURAL TITLE
great success are Dorothy Griffith, on campus including the graduating "The difficulty of any such con-
'30, chairman, Gladys Appelt, '23, vention as that of the deans of women Heady play on the part of the en-
clerk of cour°: e, Jeannette Saurborn,I nurses are invited and are urged to vexiooaitatofth
'29, scorer, and Eunice Child, '28, attend the supper which will be the held February 27 through March 1 in tire Group I team proved too much
starter. loccasion for the first appearance of Boston is that to a large extant it con- for the Martha Cook players Wed-
aecerns itself with problems more gen- nesday night and sent them to a 411
seniors ini caps and gowns. Missconitefwh rllenmregn
Alie loyda dg s Miss Graceeihardsrally than with solutions," Miss to 23 defeat in a fast, hard fought
Srl thanooithOfoutionscMTo
Alice Lloyd, Miss Grace Richards, adviser to women, contest, the victory for the Group I
and Miss Beatrice Johnson, advisers stated in commenting on the confer- team- giving them undisputed claim
Hold Yearly Banquetj women, will be the guests of the once. to the university intramural basket-

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of Sportswomien

TO HOLD BANOUETI
AT FIELD HOUSEj
Awards for the entire athletic sea-1
son will be presented by Dr. Bell,
head of the school of Physical Edu-
cation and the all-star team will be
announced aththe annual basketball
banquet, which will be held at 5:41,
Tuesday, March 13, in the new Field
house. There will be dancing be-
tween courses, for which the music
will be furnished by Edna Mower's
orchestra.
Committee heads for the banquetI
are as follows: food, Margaret Stahl,
'30; decorations, Sarah Bonine, '28;
guests, Jeannette Sorborne, '29; tick-
ets, Arliene Heilman, '30; and wait-
resses, Roberta Reid, '31.
Tickets, $1.25 each, may be ob-.
nained from Arniene eilman, dial
21831, anytime before Friday night.
erwards. At this juncture the Mar-
tha Cook guards opened up with long
passes the full length o1 the court

BARNARD DEAN TO
VISIT ANN ARBOR
Dean Gildersleeve of Barnard col-
lege will visit Ann Arbor, Monday,
March 12 as a University lecturer.
Dean Gildersleeve is one of the fore-
most educators of the country and all
university women are urged to attend
her lecture to be given at 4:15 o'clock
in the Natural Science building. Thei
dean received her A.B., degree from
Barnard college in 1899. She was the
first president of the Intramural as-
sociation of University women and'is
well known throughout this country.
The Ann Arbor branch of the Amer-
ican Association of University women
will honor Dean Gildersleeve at a
luncheon at the Michigan Union,
March 12. This will take the place of
regular March meeting of the organ-
ization, and members and their guests
should notify Mrs. Max Winkler, 1520
Cambridge Road not later than Satur-
day of this week if they are- planning
to attend. Word may also be left at
the Alumnae council office by calling
through the University exchange.
W --EN'C ClU APIINTS

Offering besides a dinner, a de- senior class.
lightful program, the School of Mu- The sale of tickets, the price of
sic will hold its annual banquet at which will be $1.60, will be under
6:30 o'clock on Monday, March 12, the direction of Jean McKaig, '28, and

]

at the Michigan Union. This banquet
is being given under the auspices of
the Symphonic league, which is the

women's organization of the School.
Carolyn G. Slepicka, '29, who is vice
president of the Symphonic league, is
general chairm'an of the banquet. As-
sisting her as committee members
are Elizabeth Schwier, Mildred M.
Stanger, Bernice 0. Wilson, and Su-
san L. Stratton, all of the School of
Music.

will be held beginning Monday at
Barbour gymnasium, at the same desk
where caps and gowns may be ob-
tained.
Following the dinner, an honor
guard of juniors will meet the sen-
iors and conduct them to the Whit-
ney theater where they will be the
guests at the opening of the Juniorj
Girls' Play, "For the Love of Pete."
Arrangements are being made for
the decoration of the banquet hall,
a. special table being planned for 30

t

Miss-Hoyle Speaks persons at
of women an
On Social Problems cetiesMorta
ciety. Groupe
be smaller or
At a meeting of the Women's Ed- and 60 gradu
ucational club Wednesday afternoonq
in the Faculty Women's club rooms, KAPPA
Miss Edith Hoyle, American history THETA
teacher in the University high school, WIN F
spoke on "Social Problems of the
Teacher. Tw ~e
Relating some of her own obser- Irorities which
vations and experiences of the social! nual Penny
problems of teachers in various night. Each p
schools that she has taught Miss box of chocol
Kappa Delta
Hoyle advised the club members to original booth
sound out the community. "The ta Phi Alpha
teacher in the public eye has to not money on thei
do things of which the people in the Kappa Delta
town disapprove," she said. Theta Phi Alp
With the, advice that it pays to talk Seller." Chi (
about the fine things, Miss Hoyle said works receive(
that one of the worst mistakes that originality, an
a teacher can make is to run down ! Omega receiv
the town in which she is teaching, for their mon
and concluded by admonishing the three highest
girls not to talk about other teach- madeare.as
ers. pha, $27.61; M
Announcement of a tea to be given Chi Omega, $
for visiting superintendents at the A large am
Schoolmaster's Convention to be held the Show Boa
next month was also made at the whole carniv
meeting. than $300.

ich will be the advisers
d the two honorary so-
rboard and Senior So-
d around this table will
nes for the 518 seniors
ating nurses.
DELTA AND
PHI ALPHA
RST PRIZES
were awarded to so-
had booths at the an-
Carnival Wednesday
rize was a three pound'
ates, one being given to
for having the most
, and the other to The-
for making the m'ost
ir booth.
a had the museum, and
pha the "Graham's Bestj
Omega with their wax-
d honorable mention fors
d Martha Cook and Chij
ed honorable mention?
ey making ability. The
amounts that werei
follows: Theta Phi Al-
Martha Cook, $27.37; and1
17.30.
ount was cleared from
at and profits from the
al amounted to more

"There were, however, a number of
interesting talks, one of the best being
that of Dr. Ben Wood, director of the
Bureau of Collegiate Educational Re-
search of Columbia college. He be-
lieves that 'we should learn the chil-
dren and let teaching take care of it-
self.' "
"Learning the children," Dr. Wood
defined as the need for individual;
diagnosis. The comparison of a doc-f
tor's methods and that of a teacher is
appaling, he stated, pointing out the
vast amount of detailed information
which the doctor takes into considera-
tion to throw light on every cas3e. He'
feels that the teaching profession must
accumulate records and must agreel
upon a definite terminology. In the
matter of the kind of record to be
developed he has worked out and pre-
sented a sample chart to give a com-
prehensive picture of a pupil's abil-
ity, effort, and attainment in both
academic and social activities.
His admontion is that teachers
should report concrete observations
and not inferences which they dIraw
from them. His effort is to reduce
what he terms college mortality,,
which sees the dismissal of more than
one-third of each freshman class.
"Health intelligence," the know-
ledge and will to keep one's health,
was one of the main points in the
talk given by Dr. Martha Tracy, dean
of the Women's Medical college of
Pennsylvania.
Miss Ada Comstock, president of.
Radcliffe, brought forward the prob-
lem of the graduate student, herI
opinion being that a definite effort
should be made to prevent their be-
coming isolated individuals and to
provide such life as would unite them
into "a colony of young scholars."
Among other interesting features of
the convention was the Pan-hellenic
congress, one session of which Miss
Richards attended.

I

1'6 11 l~ eti I the dom11.:- in an attem pt to get the ball to their
a result, the passes between the dor- forwards, which effort was thwarted
mitory centers and forwards were by the opposing guards. Cooperative
poor and enabled the Group teamplybwentmamdhire-
guards to gain easy possession of the play between them and their cen-
ball. Play during the entire first ters by using short passes figured
quarter was characterized by inabil- a great deal in enabling ther. to get
ity of both teams to hang onto the the ball down the court.
ityl The lineup was as follows:
. Fouls Tally Six Points GROUP I IARTIA ('Ol
Lauer ............Ph..... Middlewood
Both sixes found themselves at the Zahl...................lMiaueoiit
opening of the second quarter, how- I eyahl.............JC+."...... .Be krn
eve, ad saped ntopla. n kep-; eyer...........I C ......... Becker
ever, and sna pped into play. In keep- Ur'ban . ... .. .. .. .SC.. . .. . ...Sauborn
ing the early lead which it had, the'Ubn.....S ....Saor
zoe team had to play hard ball cdtii Treadwell.......( .. ......Fenneberg
ing this period. Fouls enabled each McKee..........
team to tally six points, with the -
scoring standing 21 to 13 at the end
of the half.
Taking the ball shortly after the
tipoff in the second half, Stahl open- Specil Sale oR
ed the scoring again for the Group
team. Middlewood came back with a
goal for the dormitory six but Stahl Double A-Regular-
scored two baskets immediately aft-
i Oscillator-Regular
Fast washing-Big
The most amazing

!ball championship title. The largest
crowd of spectators ever to witness
a local women's contest watched' the
game which was played as a feature
during the Penny Carnival. As a. re-
sult of the game Martha Cook goes
into second place in th efinal stand-
ing of the A tournament.
Starting from the first whistle, the
Group I players rushed their oppo-
ients, forcing them to hurry their
passes and to make numerous er-
rors in shooting for the ba ket As

NOMINATING COMMITTEE
The executive board of the Faculty
Women's club has appointed the fol-
lowing members as the nominating
committee: Mrs. W. A. Frayer, Mrs.
John Sundwall, Mrs. Max Winkler,
Mis. C. W. Griffin, Mrs. 0. W. Bos-
ton, Mrs. C. E. Goddard, and Mrs.
A E. Wood. ' The committee will be
glad of any suggestions that the club
members may offer.
The offices of president and secre-
tary are to be filled, and the chair-
men for the following standing com-
mittees are to be chosen: the refresh-
ment, entertainment and house com-
mittees.
ABC Washers
$155.00, Now $95.00
$105.00, Now $75.00
capacity-No oiling.
values ever offered.

am

TYPEWRITER
REPAIR1NG
All makes of ma-

ONE'S REFLECTION
Is Invariably Satisfactory in
Regard to
THE VAPER PERMANENT
MIRROR BEAUTY SHOP

Ernst Bros.
Electrical Shop
210 South Fourth Ave.

V?

EMS

COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN
will find the Packard Restaurant,
bigger and better than ever.
703 Packard St.
*-.
Swift's Dru Store
(Opposite Law Building)
FOR
PRINTING
and
DEVELOPING
One-day Service
All Work Guaranteed
Eastman films carried in stock.

chines.. Our equip.
ment and personnel
Is considered among
the best in the state. The result of
twenty years' careful building.f
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 6615.

19 Cutting Apts.

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WGMAW4a AK19
-f-

Thirty-fifth Annual
HILL AUDITORIUM -:- ANN ARBOR
May 16, 17, 18, 19, 1928
ARTISTS AND ORGANIZATIONS
EARL V. MOORE Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK Orchestral Conductor
ERIC DELAMARTER Guest Conductor
PERCY GRAINGER Guest Conductor

We- sll
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ti
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titi
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Almendinger's
For
MUSICAL
SERVICE
Columbia New Process
Records. All Latest
Releases.
Repairing of All Musical
Instrumcnts
305 Maynard St.

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS
LEONORA CORONA S
Prima Donna Metropolitan Opera Co.
LEONE KRUSE S
Prima Donna Chicago Civic Opera
MARIE MONTANA S
Talented American Artist
MARGUERITE D'ALVAREZ Co
Late Chicago Opera Company
MARGARET MATZENAUER Co
Metropolitan Opera Company
MERLE ALCOCK Co
Metropolitan Opera Company
PAUL ALTHOUSE

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is
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31
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oprano
oprano
oprano
ntralto
ntralto
ntralto
Tenor
Tenor
aritone
aritone
Bass
Violin
Piano
Organ
Pierne
rainger
i T7 k

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The magic of Fas
has been woven
the new spring fr
we are show i

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sleeves

are va

necklines are un
ventional ; everyl
is new and voguis
As many of our
son's best crea
are among the
first arrivals, we
gent early choosin

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hion
into
ocks
ng; 4
ried;
icon-
hing
h.
sea-
tions
very
sug-
rg.

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-

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There couldn't be a more pleasant place to
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entertain your friends.
The food is excellent. The service swift and-
}1accommodating and the prices moderate. -

Metropolitan Opera Company
TUDOR DAVIES
British National Opera
MARIO BASIOLA
Metropolitan Opera Company
RAYMUND KOCH
American Opera Company
CHASE BAROMEO
La Scala and Chicago Operas
BENNO RABINOF
PERCY GRAINGER
PALMER CHRISTIAN
CHORAL WORKS

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Priced at
14.75
(Second Floor)

St. Francis of Assisi
Marching Song of Democracy

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