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March 06, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-06

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 6, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postae granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
4ffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
' ard Street.
Phones: Eflitorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOUR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor.... ....... ....Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly ..Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor.............Philip C. Brooks
City Editor........... Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor ...........Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor.........Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart flooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J.aKern Nelson J. Smith, Jr
Milton 'Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson lohn H. Maloney
Margaret Arthur Marion McDonald
Alex A. Bochnowski Charles S. Monroe
jean Campbell Catherine PriceF
Jessie Church Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Eleanor Scribner
James B, Freeman Corinne Schwarz
Robert J. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
P'laine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Xice Hageishaw George L. Sinmons
Joseph 1;. Iowell Rowena Stillman
J. Wallace Hlushen Sylvia Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
WilliameF. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
.awrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr
onald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
dally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
'ack L. Lait, Jr Toseph Zwerdlitsg
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr
Advertising..... ........Richard A. Mey'..
Advertising.............Arthur M. Hinkley
Advertising..........Edward L. Hulse
Advertising............John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts ............... .Raymond Wachter
Circulation.............George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication............... .Harvey Talcot
Assistants
George Bradley Ray Hofelich
Marie Brummeler Hal A. Jaehn
James Carpenterr James Jordan
Chlaries lt. Correll Marion Kerr
Barbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington
Mary Dively Catherine McKinven
Bessie V. Egelaod IDorothy Lyons
Ona Felker Alex K. Scherer
Katherine Frohn: George Spater
Douglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkle,
F. J. Hammer Hannah Walle.
Carl W. Hammer

step in harmony with the trend of
the times the practicability of such
procedure is questionable. Coming at
a time when one of the leading uni-
vesities in the world has just begun
to experiment with instruction in
aviation, indications are that the Cali-'
fornia high school is overly ambitious
if not aspiring to prominence by
means of the unusual. At the same
time, any venture which seriously en-
dangers the lives of its students, be
it ever so progressive or momentarily'
high-sounding, should be looked upon
with disfavor.
Theoretically at least, it must be
admitted that the venture is com-
mendable; but as for being sound and
practical at the present time, it is too
readily open to criticism.
TYROL
Mussolini is in difficulties again,
and this time it is neither France nor,
North Africa which is slated to suf-
fer but another pair of neighbors on
the north-Germany and Austria. In
Tyrol, it seems, an Italian controlled
province, there is a large and power-
ful German minority which, as is na-
tural with rational persons, has at
times attacked Il Duce through the
15 German newspapers of the vicinity.-
The whole affair seems to be about
as shallow and futile as most of the
arguments which B3enito has started
in the past five years-with the basis
that Tyrol resents his muzzling of its
press. Of course, there has been the
usual interchange of notes between
the Austrian government and Rome,
and the usual speech by Mussolini to
the hysterical thousands, but after
all this there seems to be litte or no
cause for alarm on either side.
Besides demonstrating again the
intolerant and reactionary spirit of
Mussolini, however, the affair illus-
trates another equally important fact
which should not be overlooked-and
that is the difficulties of the self-
determination theory for small na-
tions as applied by the Versailles
treaty. It was apparently assumed by

THE
BATH-TUB
~injFFUNDJ,
WE WISH TO thank the president
and his associates for their contribu-
tion, to the bath-tub fund, but the
three pennies and the two cent stamp
are not enough to buy anything. We
shall spend the pennies at the PENNY
CARNIVAL unless more is contrib-
uted.
WE REALIZE THAT IT will be
difficult to raise any money on the
campus for such a fund because it
wasn't so many years ago that the
Union did just the same thing. That
Union pool cost all the students a
pretty penny, and now they can take
a bath when they want to.
* * *
IF THE FUND BECOMES large
enough we shall order soap made
with Ben Bolt's picture on it and the
slogan, "In your most intimate mo-
ments think of Bolt-vote for him for
president."
CERTAINLY A N Y CANDIDATE
who gives away soap as campaign ad-
vertising will sure to be elected since4
the people will know he is a clean
politician. Now, then, lets all con-
tribute to the bath-tub fund, founded
by the president and his associates,l
to place Bolt in the white House.
MOSQUITOES FIND ARBORETUM{
SAFE PLACE TO SLEEP
Since automobiles and their head-
lights have been banned from the
Arboretum after dark, the Mosquitoes
Protective association has decided
that large portions of the ground will
be transformed into dormitories for
student mosquitoes. Following is the
only picture ever obtained of a meet-
ing of one chapter of the Mosquitoes
association:
~-

THEATER
BOOKS
TOIGHT: The Rockford Players
present Barry Connor's "The Patsy"
in the Whitney theater at 8 o'clock.

TONIG IlT: The Cosmopolitan
presents "International Night"
o'clock in 11111 auditorium.

Club
at 8

the members of that treaty that the s ' ' 2
plebescite and kindred self-determina- See.
tion formed somewhat of a miracul-
ous panacea for all international dif-
ficulties; the experience in Tyrol has
given rather concerte evidence of a
different reality.-r
The plebescite necessarily com- (k
pletely ignores the powerful minority (Mote: there arew o auto n i ytks
which may exist in a province, and throughe growth of poison1ivy
while Tyrol is essentially Italian (just pictured above.)

"THE PATSY"
A review, by Vincent Wall
The Rockford Players' producton
of "The Patsy"-to use a gag from
the show-is a triumph of mind over
matter. The audience didn't mind,
and the fact that they were doing
Barry Connor's rather significant
opus doesn't matter. It was descent
to intellectual rock bottom, but it was
well done, and we all laughed very
heartily and enjoyed the evening very
much. Whatever measure of success
it attains is due to a large extent to
Frances Dade, who does more than
act the part of Patricia Harrington;I
she is Patricia Harrington. The
young lady in question is one that
legion of synthetic Cinderellas whose
national convention would have to be
held in Madison Square Garden.
However, since Miss Dade blossoms
early and often in this shabby saga
of American home life, it does tri-
umph-or something very like it.
Still it isn't by the pure virtuosity
of Miss Dade's face, figure and ward-
robe that it does this. Robert Hender-
son plays one of his best juvenile
roles of the season; Kate Holland
Patton and Charles Warburton do
very nicely as the Mr. and Mrs.-
straight from the comic strips; Velma
Royton does well by the wicked sis-
ter-she probably hates the part to
such an extent that her acerbity is
natural; Franz Rothe looks very
handsome in a tuxedo, and Samuel
Bonnell the contrary as the taxi
driver.
It is no good saying "The Patsy"
isn't good comedy. I suppose it has
a certain Therapeutic value in that it
purges the tired business man of
every thought he every had; and that
seems to be what American audiences
want. So "The Patsy" will wave as
one of the Players' successes; but
after having licked the boots of the
plebs, next week they are going to
climb back on their dramatic pedestal
and do "Hedda Gabler."
* * *
SWEETNESS AD LIGHT
International Night, a grateful and
expressive gesture to American civi-
lization and Michigan University for
past and present favors to foreign
students on the campus, will be cele-
brated tonight in Hill auditorium
with a pageant dedicated to the idea
that "Above all Nations is Humanity."
The Cosmopolitan club, organization
of foreign students, is sponsor of the
program of topical acts, professional
and amateur, and of the musical and
dancing links in the chain of the
story.
Roosevelt started it (the boy with
the big stick) when he encouraged
his celestial majesty of China to
send th brightest of his court wards
to this country for Occidental educa-
tion. Ever since, the student class
of foreigners has been sacred to the
shining cause of civilization in the
hands of the immigration official-for
all that they have been herded like
sheep-and here they are enrolled on
the campus to learn the aesthetic in
advertising, how to build skyscrapers,
and what Dewey thinks about Philos-
ophy. Noblesse oblige was ever the
Western virtue, and we bear the

Detroit Theaters
CAS5 THEATRE
Prices-Nigit.s, $1.00 to $3.00.
lWednesday Mat. $1.00 to $2.00.
Sat., at. X$1 to $2.50. (Plus Tax)
Mon., Tues. and Wed. Eves. and
Wed. Mt.-
The Mikado

REPAIRING

Auhorized Dealers for Royal Portables.
Although one year old, this "Baby" Royal has o
all other portables. "SOME BABY." Call and see v

Rider

i .t

I

Woodward, at Eliot
B ON STEIL LE
PLAYHOUSE
NIGHTS, 75c, $1.50. Mats. Tues.,
Thurs. and Sat., 5Oc, 75e
211(d Week, Be. Mon., March
The Season's Dr matic Sensation
CRAIG'S WIFE

i

3'
Ph,

is Pet% Shop
5 S. State St.
one No. 8950

PENMAKERS

,..0.

TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of ma-
chines. Our equdp-
ment and personnel
Is considered among

GA RRG
Beginning Sunday, March 4.
Farewell Tour of the World.
Famouis
Annie Nichols, comedy Success
Nights, 50c to $1.50; Wed. and
Sat. ,at. 54c and $1.40 4
"Abie's Irish Rose"

V T U RiSTS
TH4IRD CASS
ANY LINE, ANY
COUNTRY
One Way, Round Trij
era Real Low Price Tease
BOOK* NOW-
AUTHORIZED STEAMSHI? ACt:
R.G.Knebler. All UneR
601 E HURON. A?""' 47%'00

the best in the state. The result of
twenty years' careful building.
0. D.;MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 6615.

ik

TUESDAY,
Night Editor-J.

MARCH 6, 1928
STEWART HOOKER

COOPERATIVE BUYING
Large scale buying, on a coopera-
tive basis among several fraternities,
sororities, and dormitories, has ap-
parently come to stay at Michigan if
the results reported thus far are
characteristic of what can be accom-
plished through the plan. At one
dormitory, it is reported, the food cost
per capita has been reduced to 54 cents
per day, which, with the cost of labor
added, bring the total cost to 71 cents.
Eight sororities and one dormitory
were admitted to the group in the
fall, and since that time three fra-
ternities have been added. No effort
is made to secure food at a low cost,
the object being merely high nutrition
value, and the results obtained thus
far cretainly deserve attention.
In its first year cooperative buying
has apparently vindicated its exist-
ence-.which is not at all surprising,
since cooperative buying has come to
be one of the fundamental bases of
successful business enterprise in
many lines. The process reduces,
moreover, the question of diet to a sci-
ence in the hands of a skilled admin-
istrator-Miss Lenn Cooper-and if a
prediction were to be ventured it

i

as Danzig is essentially German), the
infliction of Roman government, espe-
cially when that Roman government
is a Mussolini government, is rather a
hard and bitter experience for the
German minority. Perhaps the treaty
makers have still another thing to
learn, and that is the fact that a small
state, secured by international agree-
ment, may be happier and more con-
tented to lead an independent exist-
ence than to be affixed to a larger
and possibly oppressive world power.
Blame cannot be detached from Mus-
solini, to be sure, for the present
trouble, but blame of a somewhat
indirect sort also lies with the states-
men at Versailles who calmly ac-
cepted "plebescite" as the magic cureI
for all international ills.
EDITORIAL COMMENT
FRATERNITY HEALTH OFFICERS
(The Indiana Daily Student.)
Fraternities and sororities gener-
ally have every sort of officer that
can be thought of for their organiza-
tions from the high and mighty pres-
ident down to the less important ones
Iwhose dutiP-,esnc-mir littlemr

v

il. 3

PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES
WILL ATTEND
Ben Bolt, Mayor Thompson, and
other leading candidates for the Pres-
idency on the Rolls platform are
planning to attend the PENNY
CARNIVAL, it was announced yes-
terday. Henry Ford, however, sent,
his regrets. His wire read: "AM
SORRY: WON'T BE ABLE TO AF-
FORD .CARNIVAL THIS YEAR."
FOR THOSE WHO HAVE not seen
the Michigan we will say there is a
band there, on the stage, which wears
prison uniforms. We wondered all
through the show whether they wereI
really ex-convicts or not.
IF THEY WERE they probably
have not taken the straight and nar-
row. They have found out that it is
easier to rob people by playing in a
stage orchestra than breaking into
the second story window. Then the
damages from tomatoes and eggs is
not nearly as destructive as that of
bullets.
* * *
A LOVE SONG
f waited for her answer,
I knew not what she'd say.
Then out spake she, "I love you-
BUT NOT TODAY!"
13. T.
* * *
THIS PENNY CARNIVAL is going
to be a great affair, but we wonder
wythp m nh rzin fiv otc fn

~
2.007.0
3.35 ARCADE 8.40
TODAY ONLY
WORLD FAMOUS
DUNCAN
SISTERS
IN -
TOPSY AND
EVA
TJ O:ItWRO'Y
Ester Ralston
"THE SPTLIGHIT"
a tra t
$4 otuer
iti
trips-- takskevr~rn s
bk '1s . S..g.o1bagaiou..
p1
C IVE yourself a priceless
fund of new thoughts. Give
yourself a trip abroad . . and the
pep to do a double job when
you get back.
$184.50 for two superb ocean
trips-takes you over, brings you
back. Speaking of bargains .
just compare this price with the
cost olan average"hotel" vacation.
In addition to specially reserved
quarters for TOURIST Third
Cabin passengers on such famous
liners as Majestic, world's largest
ship, Olympic, Homeric, Bel.
genland, and others-

DANCING
WEDNESDAY
8 to 10
with Music by
Bill Watkins' Eleven Wolverines
Under the personal direction of
BUD GOLDEN
at
Granger' s Academy

.

T0Ohe Sip and Bite
FOODS of QUALITY
35c LUNCH
Fried Liver and Bacon
or
Pork Sausage, Country Style,
or
2 Eggs, Any Style,
Baked Potato, Mashed Potatoes
Buttered Carrots, Whole Wheat Bread,
Coffee-Tea-Milk

would rather seem as though the suc- {" v ILe more
than keep the archives or watching
cess thus far attained indicates a more the door in meeting. But in spite of
etensive apition ofth coopera- the fact that generally such officers
tu
tiv buying in the not far distant fu- are many and have few duties, one
ture

HIGH SCHOOL AERONAUTICS
Following clos'y-too closely per-
haps-in the footsteps of their Eng-
lish predecessors at Oxford university,
a California high school has incor-
porated a course* in aeronautics into
its curriculum. The move is intended
to be a definite step in recognition t
of the movement to make instruction
in aviation a part of the curriculum1
of grade and high schools throughout

organization on the campus has cre-
ated a new one who, though at first
mention it may sound preposterous,
really is more important. than most
of those generally found. This man is
a health officer.
His duties consist in looking after
everything in the fraternity house
that has bearing on the health of the
members and he is resposible for
keeping sanitary conditions. le looks
after such matters as fresh air in the

the United States. From a gratis house and dorm~ clean kitchen, keep-
start, the high school at Galt, Califor- ing out flies and similar things. In
nia, has acquired eight motors and view of the fact that often in fra-
three airplanes, as well as other ternities many matters which have a
necessary equipment, and credit for direct bearing on health are permit-
making the course possible has been ted to go unattended, this ruling is a
given the principal who, it is said, good one.-
sold his ideas to the naval department I The conditions in fraternity kitch-
and school trustees, ens are not always all that might be
When the government made avail- desired in the way of cleanliness.
able a huge supply of aircraft for Oftentimes it is little less than mir-!
"accredited universities and aviation 'aculous that the members of a group
schools," it was not contemplated that escape contagious diseases when one
a high school would make any request regards the little care taken in proper
for equipment to be used for a course dishwashing. And when members of
in aeronautics. However. after many the organization are ill very seldom

wiy iey are c aging ve cen s or s"white man's burden" do we not?
a dance. We don't like to be nasty i -R. L. A.
but there have been co-eds and co-
eds, and some times we have known *k
boys who would have to be paid a PADLOCKED
nickel to dance with some of them. A play opened in Paris. It was
hailed, as a modern classic. Berlin,
NOW IS THE TIME for every co-ed gay and experimental, called it a
to say, "Why, I've known men you marvelous contribution. London saw
couldn't pay me to dance with." Well the play. Englishmen then went home
we don't blame them. and shut the doors before comment-
Jeb. ing. And so the play came to New
York. However, there is a law in
a step in the right direction if the New York which obliges a police-
officer performs the function expected captftin to warn the theater owner
of him. Creation of more such offices before the house is padlocked.
among the organizations might lead "Maya," is the play; a story of a!
to lessening of such dangers as al- symbol, spiritual, done in terms of
ways are present when a large group realism. Maya is all things to all
of persons live together in close con- men, whether vendor of pleasure or
tact. purveyor of dreams; sometimes she is
Now if fraternities will only start woman-wanting; other times, an
electing stewards who are capable I apparition, a tissue of ideals. The
of taking care of the duties that are transition seems too much for Ameri-
connected with that office instead of can audiences. Puritanism recognizes
placing men in the position who are only one or the other, not both.

35c DINNER
Virginia Baked Ham
or
Prime Ribs of Roast Beef
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Buttered Green Peas, Bread and Butter
Coffee-Tea-Milk
Lunch, 11:30-1:00-Dinner, 5:30-7:30

Let us send you literature de.
cribing our unusual values in
economical travel.
urwosr aCnd s[vrrcz
\I tvi

>1

I

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