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March 02, 1928 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-02

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THF MICHICAN DAILY

PAGE FTV

FRID~AY. MARCH 2 . 1928.

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WOMEN'S LEAGUE TO'
ENTERTAINAT PARTY
Motifs Of All Holidays Will Expresst
1Uique Theme Of Affair t
Given Todayt
DANCING TO BE FEATURED'
With the expression of the unique
theme of combining the motifs of allz
holidays in one, the Women's league
is sponsoring an entertainment from1
4 to 5:30 o'clock this afternoon in
Sara Caswell Angell hall.
Perhaps the first one of its kind ont
campus, this all-Holiday party has
been the recipient of special attentionz
on the part of those in charge, and it
Is expected will prove even morerz
popular and successful than former
league parties. All University women
are extended invitations to the affair.
The program of the afternoon willn-
be varied. Feature dances, entertain-
ment, and refreshments will be comn-c
bined with dancing in the presen ta-
tion of an affair that has been plan-c
ned on a larger scale than formerly.
Edna M'ower's jazz orchestra will
furnish the music during the affair.E
As has been the custom in the past,
all women on campus have been ex-
tended the privilege of bringing their
friends, and "a gay good time with the
opportunity of meeting other womens
will be assured to every guest" say
those in charge of arrangements. El-z
len Groff, '28, heads the committee.z
JOAN OF ARC HAD
BEST OF GUIDANCE
MAUDE ROYDEN
"If it be madness to be guided by thet
voices such as those which guidedt
Joan of Arc, I wish that some of us
could lose our senses also," Miss
Maude Royden said recently in speak-
ing of the voices of Joan of Arc.
"Joan believed she heard these voices,
and that they told her first of all 'to
be good,' and afterwards to go and
save her country."
In speaking on this subject, Rev.
Robert Nelson Spencer, of Kansas
City said recently: "Maude Royden
was born with a gold 'spoon in her
mouth, a very different fate from that
of Joan. Her father, Sir Thomas Roy-
den was lord mayor of Liverpool.
Her brother, the present Sir Thomas
Royden, is chairman of the Cunard and
Anchor Line steamship companies,
and a director of a number of rail-
ways and banks in England.
"You may not call it much, the
way Miss Royden got her call to
preach," Rev. Spencer went on. "One
day when she -was a little crippled
child, a carriage stopped at her house
during a bitter rain, and a dowager-
like person got out. When Lady Roy-
den expressed pleasure at the call, es-
pecially on such a wild day of rain,
the dowager-like person exclaimed,
'Oh, you know I came in a carriage.'
It was right there that the child re-
solved that if strength were given her
she would tell all England that not
everyone can ride in carriages. It
was not that it was a sin to ride in
carriages; it was the tone of the
dowager-like person.
"A tiny, tiny thing, you say. Yes,
but they are not always loud, these
voices. Is it because her physical in-
'firmity, her earlier years of pain,
schooled her to such sympathy as she
shows in her sermons, and in her pub-
lished writings? If so, she has war-
rant to speak to all who suffer, and
to speak victoriously, for she over-
came to a great degree her physical
handicap," concluded Rev. Spencer.
Six more days until the Penny Car-
nival.
Save your pennies for you will need
them at the Carnival next Wednes-
day night.

GREENE SAYS SPEED OF READING VARIED ?EATURES
EFFECTS NO CHANGE IN RESULTS ILSRE!

I I - . - w -% W-ft e4 I

Daily Bulletin of Sportswomen "

Following a series of experiments in
which four groups of students engaged
last semester, Edward B. Greene of
the pyschology department concludes
that the speed at which technical ma-
terial is read makes little difference
so far as results are concerned. He
describes the experiments as follows:
"Four groups of students engaged
in an experimental study of controlled
reading last semester to find out
whether the 'speed of reading serious-
ly affected the results on immediate
and delayed tests. Approximately 75
students, two-thirds men and one-
third women, composed each group.
They were directed to read technical
articles! each 2,500 words long. Group
I was to read very slowly; Group II
read slowly and took notes; Group III
and IV read a's fast as they could and
repeated the selection several times.
"At the end of the experiment the
students were all asked to estimate
their familiarity, interest, and effort
on each topic, and also to indicate
their usual reading habits on this sort
of material.
"The results in general show that
all the groups were approximately
equal in ability when measured by the
Iowa reading tests, scholastic aver-
ages, and usual reading habits. Fol-
lowing directions Group I actually
read at the average rate of 122 words
a minute; Group II at 104 words a
minute; Group III at 180 words a
minute; and Group IV at 185 word's a
minute. There was a very small
overlapping between the slow and fast
reading groups and a very reliable
average difference which amounted to
approximately 65 words a minute.
"On the immediate tests those that
took notes did not make quite as high
scores as the other three groups, but
there was no reliable difference be-
tween any of the groups which could
be attributed to 'speed of reading.
"On the delayed tests the group that

took notes equaled or exceeded the
other groups in every topic, indicat-
ing that they had retained more in-X
formation in spite of the fact thatt
they had not reviewed their notes in t
the interim.
"The students estimated that the
first topic dealing with the mental
measurement of a vaudeville memor-
izer was the most interesting. The
last topic, on auditory discriminationT
in white rats, proved to be next mo'st
interesting to all except Group IV.1
In Group IV a large proportion ofr
students rated this topic below aver-1
age in interest, and they also made
scores below average on the tests.
This indicates that all studies of this
sort must be accompanied by a reli-
able student estimate of interest. z
"Student estimates of effort indi-
cated that none of the groups main-
tained as much effort at the end of aj
25-minute reading period as they did,
at the beginning. I feel that even for
a college student 25 minutes of un-
interrupted reading of hard technical1
material is too long a period. A more#
efficient use of the time would prob-
ably be found in reviewing or resting,
every 10 minutes. Other experiments
are being carried on now to try to
find out the best use of time."
Diplomatic Service 1
Is Opened To Women
Competitive examinations for en-
trance to the diplomatic service have
recently been opened to the women'
of France. This step allows women in!

Clowns galore, balloons, and pop- _5
corn! The noise of tin horns and
people calling happy little nothings BASEBALL SEASON
to each other! A thrilling tussle for
the women's intramural basketball WILL OPEN SOON
championship! Fishing! Fortunes!
And last but not least, a jitney dance, Baseball managers for the four
jazzy orchestra, pretty girls! What classes will hold their first meeting!
does it all suggest? A Penny Car- ! Monday-arch5 for the purpose
nival!
Only a Penny carnival could con'- of making lans for the im nding
bine them all into one evening of season.
rushing, crowding jollity; and that The baseball season will open with
is just what the Penny carnival is a double elimination tournament,
going to do, from 7 to 10:30 p. In., played indoors, which will begin on
on March 7, everywhere in Barbour March 12. Because the season is
gymnasium. If you have been won- scheduled to start at such in early'
dering what the word "collegiate" date, it is imperative that all manag-
means, then come and find out. If you ers be present at the meeting to plan
can find a single Indian head, then for their respective classes. If a mae-
save it. Bring yourself and your ager or any team is unable to attend,
jingling change to the biggest Car- a substitute will have tto take her
nival in all history. place.
Under the leadership of Betty Managers are also asked to hand
Smither, '29, general chairman, Eloise in on Monday lists of those who will
Avery, '30, is directing preparations probably play on their teams.
for that jitney dance; Dorothy Flynn,
'30, for decorations; Jessie Church, Program F S
'29, publicity; Dorothy McKee, '30, For prino
who starred as a slown in the Soph- W ill Include Indoor
omore Circus, is directing and fab-
ricating more clowns; Dorothy Tau"f, Golf Class Contest
'30 is to have charge of all the jing-
ling change; and working with the
SAt etn+rcrs aaeso

, -f ............

Group I Overwhelms!
Alpha Omicron Pi
Rough play and crude floor workt
characterized games played yesterday f
in the semi-final round of the A intra-
mural basketball tournament between.
Alpha Omicron Pi and the Group Ij
independents in which the independent
team emerged victorious by a 50 to
18 score. By winning over the sor-
ority team the Group I six put itself in
line to meet the Martha Cook building
team to determine the champions of
the 1928 intramural tournament.
The game started with a rush, both
teams showing nervousness due to
over anxiety to gain possession of the
ball. The sorority team was first to
score but was soon headed by the in-
dependent team. During a let-down
period of guarding Stahl and Zauer
tallied three goals apiece and put their
team into a lead which they main-
tained throughout the remainder of
the period. At the end of the first
quarter the score stood 13 to 4 In
favor of the independent six.
The second quarter opened with a
quick succession of goals by the Group
I players. The game slowed down
considerably, both teams making er-
ratic passes and numerous fouls being
committed. The players resorted to
long overhead passes which were re-
'sponsible for the .erratic play, the
snappy close-in passing game of the
earlier period being abandoned. The
ball rolled out of bounds frequently.
Naa thn eln f fith naind frl c -I

NOTICES
JUNIOR IWOMEN
Chorus two will please come
to Room C, Newberry hall, be-
tween 1 and 5 o'clock to have
dresses fitted. This is essential
in order to have pictures taken.
The meeting of Alpha Lambda Del-
ta will will be held at. 4 o'clock to-
day in Barbour gymnasium. The time
announced in yesterday's Daily was
an error.
All basketball games between
freshman groups will not be played
as the tournament is definitely dis-
continued.
There will be an open hour for
golf at 3 and 4 o'clock on Fridays at
AT

Alit!

,G

general chairn-an are Margaret
'30, and Doris Renkinburger,
Ed. Among the eight of them
ought to be able to make. the
nival live up to the wildest of
ises. D'r. Lovell says they will,
reports are undoubtedly true.
Lovell is always right!

Bush.
Spec.
they
Car-
prom-
so all!
Dr.1

At a meeting of class managers of
golf yesterday at Barbour gymnasium,,
Eleanor Treadwell, '28, who is the
W.A.A. Board golf representative, out-
lined plans for the season. The first
event on the spring program will be
an indoor tournament between class-
es which will be staged in two or
tl~nn k dl~ dlnn~ inf i thp nr-

I F

STATISTICS SHOW'
ENROLLMENT GAIN
OVER LAST YEAR
Regardless of various rumors that
the enrollment of the University of
Michigan has fallen off in the past
year, statistics from the Registrar's
office show a total increase of 301
students over last year's 12,313. This
increase may be found in all of the
different schools and colleges.
The business administration school
leads the increases with an exact
doubling of its enrollment. Th-a num-
ber of men and the number of women
are both doubled. This school now
ha's an enrollment of 114. The lit-
erary school stands next in the list
with an increase of 102, totalling 5630,
then the medical school with 61 more
students enrolled for 1927-28, making
a total of 666.
A loss of enrollment is found in the
College of Engineering and Archi-
tecture, the Nurses' Training school,
the College of Pharmacy, and the'
dental college.
And Now The
Vapor Permanent
Absolutely no risk of burn-
ing, because no electric heat
is applied to the hair.
The
Chemical Reaction
Wave
MIRROR BEAUTY SHOP
19 Cutting Apts.

I
i
t{j
I

.ii. . . caaai"thra we s;, U..41C 0Uelan ngupont le pr iear In e cls o pors eOteelllour suc
France the right to be admitted tol gress made in the elective classes. cessive baskets w-re tallied by the
the diplomatic service but does not! SENORA OF SPAIN I For the present every candidate for Alpha Omicron Pi forwards before
allow them to exercise all the func- CRITICIZES WOMEN the first squad will be closely Stahl of the independent team sunk
scored daily upon her percentage of the final counter of the first half.
tions of the embassy and consulate Accurate driving, mashie, and niblick The second half of the game pepped
posts. The modern woman is stumbling o shots. The' first squad will undoub- up considerably but was rough and
Before all the functions of these over herself in her haste to be mod- tedly be made up of eight players. hard fought. Eagerness for a victory
posts are allowed to women there ern, Dona Isabel do Palencia believes, Elective classes which opened at the on the part of the players of both_
must be a modification in the exist- but she will soon realize that "the beginning of the new semester are teams was accountable for the nature
ing regulations, since the present law best way is to stand up straight and being held in the field house five days of the game.
requires that occupants of certain of- pick her course slowly and surely." weekly in the late afternoon. Only
fices must have completed military Senora de Palencia is a leader among the classes at 4 o'clock on Tuesday, at RIBBONS AND
service. However even the conserva- women in ' Spain and is in- this coun- 4 on Friday, and at 5 on Friday remain SUPPLIES
tive Echo de Paris declares that the try on a lecture tour. She sees in the to be filled. for all makes of
final reform will come. future a well regulated woman who ____-raaTYPEWRITERS
France is not the first country to can have her children and keep, It is rumored that one will be able YT
to admit women to a diplomatic and abreast of the times intellectually and to buy and see all sorts of things at Rapid turnover, fresh stock insures
consular career. Norway sent a politically. She herself is responsi- the Penny carnival, and that not only best quality at a moderate price.
woman representative to Mexico, and ble for the establishment of the first seven but eight wonders of the world 0. D. M O R R I L L
China also employs women in diplo- women's club in Spain, which is now will be there. 17 Nickels Arcade. Phone 661.
matic functions. concluding its first year.
_ _ -- "Women today, and particularly the ..................
Did you know that you could dance wonien of America, are so excited SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER
at the Penny carnival next week to about having their independence Treat yourself to a real chicken dinner next
the tune of a real orchestra? their vote, their business jobs, theiryad
political appointments, that they for- Sunday. A dinner "fit for a king." Especially
Preserve your time and money for get that they have other things to
you will need both .Wednesday night, do also, ' declared Senora de Pal- - prepared for you.
March 7, at Barbour gym. jencia. And don't forget our regular noonday
lunch at forty cents.
If YOU have not given- Newv. Lincoln Restaurant
The Salvation Army mortgage burning campaign after a little LIBERTY AT STATE
over two weeks campaigning is still short $11,000 of its goal.J...............................~. ..........
Up to this point the campaign has gone well. Hundreds of givers-
have responded promptly and generously and the Salvation Army and

to place beside
"THE LAST WARNING"
and "DLGYE
Comedy Club
presents
PHILLIP BAR Y'S
SMART COMEDY
Yo

I

the Advisory Board are grateful to them. But we have not heard
from a large number of Ann Arbor citizens who, no-doubt, would like
to help but who have not had the opportunity. Their pledges are
essential to success. Without them we cannot win-and to fail the
Army in their emergency would be a reflection on our City.
We must not fail-and with your help we shall not. For your
convenience a pledge card is printed below. Fill it out and mail it
to campaign headquarters at the Salvation Army Citadel or call
phone number 8353 and a solicitor will be sent to pick it up.
Won't you do this-PLEASE, for an organization that has helped
others willingly and faithfully for the past thirty years and who now
need OUR help. Let's give it-Generously.
Salvation Army Advisory Board,
E. W. Staebler, President.
March........1928
I hereby subscribe to the Salvation Army mortgage burning
campaign,.........Dollars.
Payable in cash, or as follows.
. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Name ........................................
A ddress ......................- . . - . . . .
Make checks payable to Wm. L. Walz, Treas., and mail to
cajpaain headquarters, 220 E. Waslhingrton Street.

Thirty-fifth Annual
M' AAY FESTIVAL
HILL AUDITORIUM - ANN ARBOR
May 16, 17, 18, 19, 1928
ARTISTS AND ORGANIZATIONS
EARL V. MOORE Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK Orchestral Conductor
ERIC DELAMARTER Guest Conductor
PERCY GRAINGER Guest Conductor
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS

I

h0
\\ s
New Flowers
for Spring
©01"No costume is smarter than the acces-
sories that accompany it" might well be
called one of fashion's truisms by-now. One
might also add that the best known way
to brighten up a not-so-new outfit is with
the aid of a few well chosen accessories.
There are the new Spring flowers to match
your costume-to add saucyness to your .
sports frock-to add charm to the afternoon
frock -to add the final note of grace to your
evening gown.
49c up

A Harvard
Prize Play
by
The author of "White
Wings," "The Youngest,"
"Cock Robin," "Paris
Bound."
with
Tom Dougall
Phyllis Loughton
Richard Kurvink
Lillian Setchell
Wade Carney
Mabel Baruch
Hoyt Sherrill
Alexander Woollcott
said: "Of all the play,
which have drifted into
New York, I have en-
joyed most the bright
comedy "You and I."
T H E AT R E
TONIGHT
and Saturday
Seats for all per-

Luncheons

Dinners
Refreshments
The Finest of Home-made Candies. See
us for your Easter orders early to insure the
choicest of sweets.
Prekete'
SUGAR BOWL

LEONORA CORONA
Prima Donna Metropolitan Opera Co.
LEONE KRUSE
Prima Donna Chicago Civic Opera
MARIE MONTANA
Distinguished American Artist
MARGUERITE D'ALVAREZ
Late Chicago Opera Company
MARGARET MATZENAUER '
Metropolitan Opera Company
MERLE ALCOCK
Metropolitan Opera Company
PAUL ALTHOUSE
Metropolitan Opera Company
TUDOR DAVIES
British -National Opera
MARIO BASIOLA
Metropolitan Opera Company
RAYMUND KOCH
American Opera Company
CHASE BAROMEO
La Scala and Chicago Operas
BENNO RABINOF
PERCY GRAINGER
PALMER CHRISTIAN
CHORAL WORKS
St. Francis of Assisi .
Marching Song of Democracy
'rL . -L t.,-n - fl .-.,, , L 1 --

Soprano
Soprano
Soprano
Contralto
Contralto
Contralto
Tenor
Tenor
Baritone
Baritone
Bass
Violin
Piano
Organ
Pierne
Grainger
T, ,1

formances now
Pn,-h __

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