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March 02, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-03-02

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1928

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Cbnference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en.
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
ffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
aard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor...................Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor............. Philip C. Brooks
City Editor...........Courtland C. Smith
Wonen's l ditor........... Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor ........Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor. ...... Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson lohn H. Maloney
Margaret Arthur - Marion McDonald
Alex A. Bochnowski Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
essie Church Harold L,. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Eleanor Scribner
James B. Freeman Corinne Schwarz
Robert T. Gessner Robert G. Silbar
Elaine E. Gruber Howard F. Simon
Alice Hagelshaw George 1'. Simons
Joseph F. Howell Rowena Stillman
1. Wallace Hushen Sv'via Stone
Charles R. Kaufman George Tilley
William F. Kerby Bert. K. Tritscheller
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
rack L. Lait, Jr. oseph Zwerdling
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr.

clusions by observations of entire
classes of engineering students pro-
ceeding through their four years'
training and their work after gradua-
tion; they have further checked them
against the questionnaire returns of
many graduates who have testified on'
the value of different parts of the
curricula.
So thorough has been the work of
the Michigan engineering faculty that
their conclusions have been adopted
in entirety by the nation-wide Society
for the Promotion of Engineering Ed-
ucation. Though the engineers do not
object on that ground, the University
college project seems to have blocked
their own more advanced work in the
past two years.
With so much in favor of the en-
gineers' rejection, the question arises:
Why include the engineering college
or the architectural college ,which is
in a similar situation, in the Univer-
sity college?
As the University college commit-
tee reported the project, the sole use
of the new college seems to be to
offer opportunity to apply new educa-
tional ideas. Why could not this ob-
ject for experimentation be consti-
tuted just as well without those two
professional colleges? Indeed, with-
out them, the resulting organization
will be more homegeneous; better fit
for experiment.
It is likely that the Regents will
sustain the President if he insists on
the inclusion of the engineering col-
lege; but careful consideration is cer-
tainly due to the stand taken by the
engineers.

ci
C
I7

PREPA RE 7
I FORROL
ELECTIONS)
THAT WORTHY BODY, the Stu-
Lent council has set the dates for the
pring elections. That is the time
when all prospective politicians and
others interested in fraud and repub-
lican government become active.
* * *
IT IS WELL TO state here that all
officers elected at these all-campus
practices in governmental control are
put into office on merit and merit alone.
rhe method of this merit is to convince
one's fraternity brothers and thenf
convince several other fraternities of
this merit. Then, the one who con-
vinces the most fraternities of his
merit wins the election. BUT NOT
TODAY.
.* * *
We Don't Blame Them For Trying To
Get Away With Sometidng
On Their Salaries
Jebbie Deah:
This absent-minded professor stuff
may be the bunk, but on the door of
the University club where the depart-
ing profs will surely see it, is a neat
little sign, "Have You Paid For Your
Game?"
* * *
THE CORRECT ANSWER for any-
one to make when looking at such a
sign is, "Yes-why-of course-" and
under his breath, "but not today."
x **
IN MEMORIAM
Ten gay and irreligious pups ca-
vorting 'neath a tree,
And ranging round our classic
halls with howls and barks
of glee;
Commenting on the lecturers
with voices loud and raw,
From Angell hall to arbour gym,
from Engineers to Law.
Too brief their sport, the B. G.
boys such freedom disallow,
They've pulled them in, Oh,
dreadful fate! They have been
pardoned now.
Canis a non canendo.
* * *

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC'

AnTRAE_____
A Little Place With Big Ideas
NOW
'T HE WESTERN ROVER'
Neil ls A-DooleyFunny
Th1Is "Ad" With 10c

..

k
h
rJ

Advertising.....,.........Richard A. Meyer I
Advertising.............Arthur M. Hinkley
Advertising . ...... ..... Edward L. Hulse
Advertising............John W. Ruswinckel
Accouts .................Raymond Wachter
Circulation.............George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication.................Harvey Talcott
Assistants
George Bradley Ray Hofelich
Marie Br uineer Hal A. jaehn
James Carpenter ames Jordan
Charles K. Correll Marion Kerr
Barbara Croell Thales N. Lenington
Mary Dively Catherine M\ cKinven
Bessie V. Egeland Dorothy Lyons
Ona Felker Alex K. Scherer
KatherinekFrohne George Spater
Douglass Fuller Ruth Thompson
Beatrice Greenberg Herbert E. Varnum
IHelen (gross Lawrence Walkley
E. J. Hammer Hannah Wallen
Carl W. Hammer
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1928
Night Editor-PAUL J. KERN
ENGINEERS AND
THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE
The inclusion of the first two years
of the engineering curricula in the
University college, sught by Pres-
ident Little but recentlyrejected by
the engineering faculty, has apparent-
ly become an issue which will be only
settled by the Regents at their next
meeting.
Though they may be unsuccessful
in overcoming the strong position of
the President, the engineers seem to
have excellent reasons for their ac-
tion. They pertain to both the four
year engineering course and to any
possible extended curricula which
adds cultural subjects.
Under the University college pro-
gram now constituted, of course, the
engineering course would continue
unchanged, except for the jurisdiction
over the first two years. On other.
grounds than pride in their institu-
tion which has been unfortunately
used against them, the engineers may
oppose this change. In the first place,
it is desirable, that the faculty teach-
ing cultural subjects to engineers
should possess their viewpoint. Since
most of the first and second year
cohrses c o n c e r n i n g engineering
are carried on in the same department
in the upperclass courses moreover,
simple and administrative efficiency
would seem to favor the engneer'
stand.
Finally, the change would practic-
ally kill the honor system for the first
two years, while it would seriously
affect its practicability for the third
and fourth years. Successful honor
systems are few; where they do work
it is by the willingness and desire of
the students. Generally some home-
genity of attitude and spirit must
exist.
In the engineering college the honor
system works well. Operating cumu-
latively, it produces a distinctive spirit
of honesty and fairness. Certainly it
is not to be discouraged.
If any extension of curricula is de-
sired, it should be made under the di-
rection of the engineering college fac-
ult . Since increased requirements
must be made simultaneously by all
advanced engineering colleges the
latter can best supervise those
changes.
In fact, though the University col-
lege might be considered as a proving

ARMANDO DIAZ
Passing one by one from the stage
of life on which they played such
eminent roles are the great figures of
the World war. Scarcely a week had
elapsed since Marshal Haig and Lord
Asquith passed away in England, I
when the news of the death of Mar-
shal Armando Diaz, leader of the
Italian forces through the great con-
flict, has come from the south of
Europe.
Never recognized generally as a
masterful military strategist, Diaz
won the respect of the entire world
in th closing days of 1918,
when the full weight of a gigantic
Austrian offensive fell on his totter-
ing command, he staved off the im-
pending tide for mponths with troops
which were neither fresh nor well-
equipped. His work as a defensive
technician in this stage was one of the
brightest spots in the record of the
entire Allied command.
In the hearts of his countrymen,
and in the hearts of those close to the
cause he served, Marshal Diaz has
won a deep and lasting niche. His
loss is one which the entire world
shares with his native country Italy-
the loss of one of the truly great fig-
ures of the World war.
LABOR WIELDS A THREAT
To any student of American politics
the statement made Tuesday night by
William Green, president of the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor, to the effect
that labor as a mass does not serious-
ly contemplate entering into politics
is not the least surprising. Labor,
organized into vast units, has always
terrified political leaders with its po-
tential power at the polls, and time
after time that power has failed to
materialize, and labor has retired
beaten to lay plans for its next cam-
paign.
The reason for this condition is not
far to seek-for the fact is that there
is no labor vote-and there probably
will not be one for many years to
come. America is not class conscious,
and its laboring classes, comparative-
ly comfortable, divide among them-
selves on the same issues which di-
vide thetremaindernofrthe country,
making their vote more or less im-
potent when considered generally.
Labor and labor problems have never,
as yet, been the paramount issue in
American politics, and until they are
there can be no decisive vote by a
Labor party. In Europe, where labor
conditions have perpetually been in
the foreground, and where a real and
I distinct struggle has arisen between
capital and labor as .units, the vote
of the laboring man has been felt-
with tremendous effectiveness.
This lack of a paramount issue
which could catapult labor as a mass
into American politics is probably a
good thing, as Mr. Green would doubt-
less admit. The sleeping giant of the
labor vote will always serve for the
prevention of oppressive measures,
and the American politician is astute
enough to be glad and willing that the
tremendous power which the Ameri-
can Federation of Labor could wield,
aligned on one side or another of a
public question, should continue to lie
dormant.

TONIGHT: The Rockford Players
present Sutton Vane's "Outward
Blound" in the Whitney theater at 8
o'clock.
TONIGHT: Comedy Club presents
Philip Barry's "You and I" in the
Mimes theater at 8:30 o'clock.
* * *
THE FIRST LADY OF THE
THEATER
After an interview with Mrs. Mans-
field, there is left one dominant im-
pression in a whole melange of con-
flicting ideas. It is that she is the
greatest living actress. It may be be-
cause there is no doubt that her late
husband was the greatest Shakespear-
ean actor on the American or English
stage. (Ilis Shylock and Richard III
have become more than a tradition;
they are a standard.) It may be be-
cause she has an amazing intellectual
conception of the stage and its mean-
ing-a depth and an understanding
that is exceptional. It may be be-
cause she has revealed herself as an
artist of capabilities and talent.
Mrs. Mansfield fhas very distinct
and original views of the drama-
both that which is contemporary and
that which is accepted as a part of
the library. O'Neill, Kelley and How-
ard are great dramatists; but the
greatest of these is O'Neill. Moreover,
she does more than most dramatic
critics I have read on the subject,
and gives a competent and coherent
explanation of what O'Neill was driv-
ing at in "Strange Interlude." She
believes that his revival of the antique
"aside" is good business; and that it
gives the actor an opportunity to ex-
press mental and psychological con-
flict that otherwise is eliminated; and
that the use of masks for the same
purpose in "The Great God Brown"
was an interesting development of the
same technique.
She was immensely interested in
the forthcoming Mimes production of
Shaw's "The Devil's Disciple" (in
which she was the original Judith,
while her husband created the part
of Richard Dudgeon); she considers
that an actor's diction is an important
and often neglected part of his art;
that while we are living in a great
and interesting dramatic cycle, it is
not as great as that of a generation
before; that we have as great drama-
tists, and many more, but not as
great actors and actresses; and so
on in a dozen observations of a more
or less profound character.
-V. C. W.

SAT.-"RED HOT TIRES"
Next Tues., Wed., Thurs.
"UNCLE TOWS CABIN"
-RAE___
SShaw Grocery Co.
w Staple and Fancy
GROCERIES r
Quality Meats
Phones 3712-3940
709-711 Packard St. =
;uiti 111111111till1 11111111111111111111111111 liii
~-
Flowers Are Now
Plentiful,
Prices Very
Reasonable.
Campus Florist
1115 So. University
Phone; ' 434

Coffee

Tea

or a
Vegetarian Dinner 35c
Poached Egg On Toast
Baked Potato
Buttered Wax Beans-Creamed Carrots
Head Lettuce Salad
Whole Wheat Bread

W hat to Eat
LUNCH 35C
Ham Croquettes or Fricassee of Veal
or
2 Eggs, Any Style,
Mashed Potatoes, Baked Potato
Creamed Carrots
Whole Wheat Bread

Coffee

Tea

Milk

Milk

Tonight 5:30 to 7:30

I
I

Vhe Si~pan lte
620 EAST LIBERT1 Y
FOODS of QUALITY

HE WILL PROBABLY ATTRACT
A COPPER AND SPEND }
HIM
To the Scathing Editor of Burnt Bis-
cuits:!
Aren't you afraid that Doc Lovell's
silver tongue will do him no good at
the PENNY CARNUVAL? Because
they say that all one needs for that is!
cents.
Worried.
* * *
AND MAY WE ADD, one pun is as
bad as another.
* * *
Which )?roves That Even The Great
Men Of History Read Rolls
Dear Jeb:z
Current "Golden Book" has a quo-
tation which should help your slogan
along:1
"But I, wretched, most wretch-
ed, in the very commencement of
roy early youth, and begged
chastity of Thee," and said, "Give
me chastity and continency, but
not today."
St. Augustine (no less).
Yours, in the interest of perfectly
useless historical accuracy,
L. T. Bang.I
* * * ,
PERHAPS THE GIRLS LIKE SODAS
Dear Jeb:
Can it be that the sudden increased
interest in "The European Open Road
Tour" among the co-eds is due to the
next to last line in the story about
it in yesterday's Daily:
The total cost, excluding such
personal items as laundry and
drinks, is $670.
Poison Ivy.
* * *
POISON IVY ALSO suggests that
there has been found the Democrats
who voted for the Democratic ticket
in Michigan in 1924. He thinks they
are the 16 who voted against the
Union amendment.
* * *
SEA-GOING COLLEGE
Some students will sail on the Ryn-
dam
With deans and professors to mind
I 'em;
When they get close to land

v

:
r

.or Economical Transportatoon

/Lil~~~@II I

F

A

* * *
A SHAMBLING HULK
The Junior Girls' Play is now pass-
ing through that immense, sprawling
madness that precedes its compres-
sion within acts to make it a whole.
There are choruses lying around loose
everywhere, the theater is full of acts,
the first act behind the third, and the
whole is a shambles. But signs of
unity are emerging-the second act is
being tied into shape-and the chaos,
under the hands of Minna Miller who
directs the cast and Vera Johnson
who handles the dancing and chorus-
es, is just beginning to suggest the
comedy inevitable in anything done
"For the Love o' Pete," and the tra-
gedy too when nature overwhelms the
puny strength of man. There seems
to be tragedy, and comedy, and farce,
and all manner of good looking non-
sense in the play but so much of it is
hidden behind the rambling bulk of
the show in its present form, and be-
hind the mask of feminine secrecy
which the players have assumed, that
a forecast is impossible. Only one
thing is sure, that there is enough
romanc3 and idiocy and melodrama
behind the idea of the story to make
good entertainment.
-R. L. A.
NEW COMBINATION
Ben Hecht has a pretty conceit in
"Eric Dorn." The superman, with
astounding penetration, announces
his intellectual conviction that con-
temporary thought-all thought for
that matter-is merely a rephrasing
of old words and concepts. There is
nothing new under the sun; the old
is merely combined in different con-
figurations.
This comes particularly to mind
in connection with the recent issue of
the "Forum" magazine which con-
tains an article by Dr. R. C. Angell.
This article discussing the "Roots of
College Evils" is the introductory
chapter to his new book, "The Cam-

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* * *
NOW WE WISH TO THANK all
those who have contributed to make
I this column of today the greatest
contributors, column in The Daily.
We sincerely appreciate it, and hope
that you and others will help break
our mail man's back.

University Chevrolet Sales
102 S. Ashley

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