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January 11, 1928 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-01-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'WRTNME Dr)Y, JANUARY 11, 192S

!P HIG r ROYA L TWO-MILE VEHIICLE TUNINEL UNDER HU' DSON RIVER, GREATEST OF ITkS O ICAMI
[6TYPE IN THE WORLD, OPERATES TWO MONTHS WITHOUT SERIOUS ACCIDENT PRE
I3U3EEE ~ i A~lla! mnwmaa ~ ~ it -riEFrr

PUS AR TIS TS
PARE ENTRIES

UNV~~II , UKWAY I
VISTSTHIS COUNTRYI;
WORK IN UNI"ED STATES DONE '
BY 'MEA\S OF RO('KEFELIVi?
F ELLO)WSHIiP
STUIDIES LANCE COLLAEGES,

1'

p eehaiIzes In, Amierican I~yvcli 0109i-E
cal Aesearch, Using. Weaki-
Mindled As Subjects
Dr. Thorleif G. Hegge of the Nor-
wegIan Royal State university, who is
In this country on the Laura Spel-
man Rockefeller Memorial fellowship
is studying the workings of various,

N4EWYORK LAND VENTILAION BUIING I1T EDAR
\ ' llk'1 Ci t't'R t 4ii1l > LQ
TUNNLA1 STr\,ac !II aU 1 1 _d { , R t re'tl.. 4,
§ SRhiNG TEET l - - - p
K EME GENC
- .-~. T L l~,f~'~ S -,rEXr, T

large universities and American psy-
chology. Hle has already visited ni y
of the larger schools including John
Hopkins, Yale, Harvard, and other
eastern universities. He will also
cover the midwestern and western
schools before he returns to his na-
tive land. He is here at present.
.Dr. Hegge, at the last meeting of
the American Psychological associ-
ation, gave a paper on some research
work that he has done at the train-
ing school in Vineland, New Jersey,
in jreerence to the connection ;of
mental age of feeble-mnded- with
their ability to learn. His subjects
were men from the life age of 8 to
54 years but with a mental age of
3 to 9 years, all inmates of th'
training school.
Studied Men
In this experiment he read a story
to the men, and also showed them
pictures pertaining to the story. A
set of simple questions were given
and the answers graded. Dr. Hegge
discovered that there is a connection
between the me tal age of a feeble
minded person and his abiity to
learn meaningful, material and show
good judgment in applying his know-
ledge to a given situation.
He, however, found that some sub-
,jects with a mental age lower than
otesshowed better judgment and
better scores than their more "intel-
ligent" associates. From these tests
Dr. Hegge observed that it is diff-
cult to draw conclusions from the
subject's scores in so-called intelli-
gence tests as to their learning ca-
pacity, which is the main problem
in the educational point of view.
He emphasizes the need for further
study of this very learning capacity,
and intends to conduct another test
with the feeble-minded of an insti-
tution in the state of Michigan. Al-
though he has visited several other
similar schools, he has not found any
that determines the patient's ability
to learn things logically and to use1
his judgment.
Interested in Memory
Dr. Hegge's main interest, howev-
er, has been for the last few years
in connection with the problem of
logical memory in reference to nor-
mal adults. He has been writing on
this subject, his latest work being a
monograph published in German as
the 13th supplementary volume of
the leading German journal of psy-
chology.
Despite the fact that Dr. Hegge has
been in this country since last July,
he has already mastered the English
language. He first came to the Ulni-
versity in the early part of November
and intends to stay six months long-
er. He has been offered a position as
visiting lecturer at the George Pea-
body College for Teachers at Nash-
ville, Tennessee, but declined to re-
main here. His fellowship is of two
years duration.
At his home university e is the
only one devoting his full time to the
study of psychology, which is a
branch of the philosophy department.
Psychology in the smaller European
countries has no independent chair,
and is taught as a physiological sub-
ject.
L~ecturer Speaks On
'League Of Nations~
"Here is a kind o Washington for
the whole world, a headquarters for
every people," declared Dr. Francis
S. Onderdonk of the architectural
school while speaking of Geneva and
the League of Nations during an il-
lustrated lecture given yesterday af-
ternoon in room 231 Angell hall un-
der the auspices of the Tolstoy lea-
gue.
The lecture was given in honor of
the ninth anniversary of the found-
ing of the League of Nations.
In keeping with the occasion, pic-
tures showing the different stages of
the work of the league were secured
from New York.

U.i H thI II I um o W t te closing date of C o leg
UD C Vb~IITIf umor s art contest a week aw ay,
vek~i~w Jan. 15, several members of the GCar-
ONNEJ9WIO - goyle art staff are working to corn-
Plant 11',11,.11e Localed Ai IMazels sort ' ;-l i, lete (irawings for the coinl~tition ..
( - _ - bSouh I Aica, And 11111 Have Abocut 10 dirawving - in blc (ani
GI?- I1('il7Telesco)pes «white will be submitted byv ar ists nt
.-!T the cawnpus.
F OURTHI EST IN WORLD The judges of the contiest are
James Montgomery Flagg, Gaar Wil-
.! , r;According to Prof. Ralph IT. Cur- lianis, Arthur William Brown , andl
/ <,die<orofaretnieriy o 1-H. N. Swanson, editor of Colee Hut-
' 4z f r~~irvatory, Harvar ld is erecting an oh -mor. About $2,000 will be aw i cde d
,prvatory in ,Uazlspoi t, South Afri llprzs
a~~~~~~~~~~ ca, just 14 milkes from the Univesit y iVI IIItli1Il~I1~IlI1I1I1It
otMihian 5 astronomical station at !!IIIIlIiJIIIIIII1htIlIIIIIIIII
Bloemnfonteinz, Orange Free State,
o. South Africa.
V F.With the Purchase recently of a
LXOAUI A ermnanent: site, the work of erecting;
(Ut LL NOH OF tUNNL.1jthE' Harvard planit has just beCgunf. Thie
man who is in charge of the work-
N~f Lis P~rof. larlowr Slalely, (director of
;U EL SGLNT the Harvard observatory. Building"
WE ' t Oio 65 eqipmenzt and the material which=-
;rill be used in constructing the st a
lE~ITo ion has been arriving at the city I :
COMPWLET
CINO 21.6 TONS since truly 1 when Harvard astrono-
%).E ter<z WAI,,A moms first began activitizes there.
_M1ich1igan1's South African astro-
?> i ornical station is located at lPlocnir
Ast ronomnical epedition. The i1ni-
r. ersity, under the dlirection of the- - -a
TH OF .TIJNNEI late Profe sor Iussey, has had a - 1 4.I
temporary -plant for the last three l W WJA LI --__
air1 Pisi1F per square inch-nearly lyears. The observatory building has
four atinospbere-in order to pre-1 already been constructed, and ol,-er- 1 a job, a J-Hop ticket, or -
vent an1 in~rush of water from above.; vations are now being made. TrheI: what not. Get what you
rf~i~e above cuit shows agera; observers ar piarl interested inwn hoghacasfe
c uiie of the construction of thej double stars. in the Daily. A few cent's
i unnel as it, is now being operated,; The new 1larvard plant, like the z xpendliture will bring _
wit i the ariantgeiict of the interior Michigan station, will include a you dollars in return."
oteJut uligo h e okgroup of buildings consisting of rei-
sidle indicat el. dences, office buildings, laboratories,-
---'; ork shops, and garages. When fill- THlE DAILY CLASSIFIED~S ,
L =NCHXAM TO TALK ly in operation the observatory will BING RESULTS
0 .RAL E TATEj house more operating telescopes -: y
than any other astronomical plant in .::HO E~11
1I;' :rt l'. 1Biughlam. a member of Ithe world. With three 60-inch tele- -
tlv. flrint of Thompson. line, and I scopes the station will be outclassedC Press Bldg. Maynard St.
1- lory : tny at law, Cleveland,i in the power of its equipment by
will 110k0 4 o'clock tomorrow only three institutions. ;I IIIiIIIIiIhiIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIiIIIIIIII
trocni206 . ;o'the Business Almin-'
ist ration building. His subject w71ll
he "Some fRecent Developments fIn
Pe'al Est ate Vinancing," with partic-
ular reference to the use of land and. 3a1
Iea~se hold trust cert ificateCs.'

After more than two months of aii in the tube is more pure than cleared within a fewr minutes.
operation not one serious ac cident has that on the surface of the s treel s, 1 The tunnel connects for the first
been reported in the great IIc and and(1 letore the t unnel was opened,, time New York City with the rest of
vehicular tunnel under the HudsonI tests conducted by the city fire corn- the United States in a direct vehicn-
river, the greatest engineering feat of I vissioners of New York-proved that; lar route. It js estimated that IY5-
its kind in the world. Opened last failI the menace. of fire is practzcally net;- 000,000 vehicles will pass through
after years of labor in the great: two ligible. A fire -started in the tunnel !the tunnel during the first year of
mile' length of the tunnel, recent w Nas extinguished by tihe regular pro- its operation. Its construction had
tests conducted have shown that the l te:°tive apparatus, and the smoke to lie carried on with 60 pounds ofs

PROFESSOR CLARENCE S. YOAKUM GIVES ADDRESS
TO MEN'S EDUCATIONAL CLUB ON ERESHMAN WEEK

Prof. Clarence S. Yoakum of the
School of Business Administration, in
com-n'enting upon freshman week,
told 30 members of the Men's Educa-
tional club Monday night that "the
purpose of testinig college students is
to get the technique by which to de-
termine as soon as possible the lead-
ers of the future."
Prof. William A. Frayer of the
hitr eatet h a 's~scheduled to participate in the di-
cussion of freshman week, was un-
able to lie' present at the meeting.
Two groups of reports on freshman
week were discussed b~y Professor
Yoakum. The first was that affecting{
attendance. In this respect Professor,
Yoakum stated, "Fresh-mmen on thej
whole started out with good intentions
but toward the end of the week at-
tendanice at scheduled. events literally
melted away. This was not due par-
ticularly to ,the freshmen but to a
great many advisors who also seemed
to have 'melted away."'
This was partly due, he said, to a
difference in emphasis, as the eventsj
of the first few days were stressed!
more than those for later in the week.I
It, was also true that the adlvisors
were very hard to find during the lat-
ter part of the week, beginning even

as early as the second day. tion?" was one question that "Profes-
The second group of r'eports were orYoakum put to the mnen of t he
those of the advisors andl concerned1clbIethnpiedothaig
difficultiles and(1outstanding freshmen,
freshmen outstanding for the interest' school grades and even the gra ti('
that tihey seemed to take in the Uii; made by a freshman during his first
versity and freshmnen outstanding for year at college are poor indications
opposite interests. Mlany of the fresh- of his ultimate student tenden(Iles.
men, particularly the loc-al one-s,
seemedl to think that they were well
'inough acqluaint ed with the Univer-
sity.
The 1,1376 freshmen taking the testA
were interesting in the showing that C O R O N A.
they made as a whole in comparison
with the records that had been pre- the dionee °p
pared liy the UTniversity o' Iowa au-
thorities who also prepared the tests, ealy a
In the English tests, the Michigan nilo
freshman showed a higher averages0.D. IT
than the irms servedl to indicate' 17 'Niclhels Ai'c~tdVe
while in the mathematics test thje Authorized Dealer: L. C. Sm 1 tir
new Michigan men fell six points b~e-, Iteniintoo ala d Unr
low the Iowa standards. Rcnti2g' and rcpatirj.ll 0
:Can these tests be used in any _________________
iaay to aid in the process of selec-

I

ItRRILL,
&t coror Tyj)e write Fs, Inc.; also
dcv w Otii jt"ta]es.
of al i,- m21'es a .Spccale

THURSDAY-ONE DAY ONLY

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Y@UTH! SPEED! LOVE!

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ORPUEUM..
TEATREM
TODAY ONLY

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Fsj ! t& i
C- _Y
~,~Jld C7~Ie

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PROGRAM

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OCDAY' KAR L WIEiIROL I)S e_ 1( Xr llS~
FLOYD ItOF-IIAN VT THlE GOI)EIN VAOl':EI) O1I1 ,:
°TH COLLEGE GLEE -CLUB

4

N ~iLIClly
MA I i NF ES
l 0M, 5lie

STAGE PRESENTATION
WIEST' & STAN "ON

A. LITPTLEI

AN1D C0~
I IN
RHYME &REASON

LiES S

ON 'THE SCREEN

WO WASH?
THIS rMAN THAT
LAUGHED-?

A

LISTEN!

EGINALD

PO.LICY
1:30
x :30
67:00
S:i4K

0cThe nearest thing v
.0c to greased lightning 30c
IAML;(you've ever seen!

V

TOPICS

HE'S HERE
Again

NEWS

COMEDY]

Like the jungle (childi
she wvas, she knew no
l aws - her shiameless
0 love is a genuine
il~ uniting (Of societ y's
' nral code. It i~s
j strangt, unusual, t he
C most (dramLatic love'
st4ory ever unfolded.
AND TONITE
Is
Country Store Nite
LETS'SGo(

TOMORROW

Did you see Esther ~
Ralston in "Figures & r
Don't Lie?" Wasn't -
It Great?
SPECIAL ATTRACTION ~ ~~
ROY SMECK "Wizard of the Strinlg e
F"ortner Soloist with PAUL SPFCVI' ORIIIESI RA

f
i

I

~WLUAK fOX presents 77jZ Wl dy Greaoest )!o 0ion Picwtt
u

m

.

'

.. .r; . thi: 7 7 77

®

ORGANISATIO

. 7GAPHS

__ _ A -

11

Lamgest Camera Room

38 Years' Service

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