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February 10, 1928 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-02-10

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PAGE FOUR

THEIFMICHTG'AM fDATT Y

Tf'RTTT.AY_ PERRIT ARV 10. '1 W1 R

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Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatchcs credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
Aished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.oo; by mail,
$4.5g0.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
hard Street.
IPhones-Editorial, 4925; Business 2214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor.... ..... ......Ellis 13. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly. . Charles . Behymer
Staff Editor..............Philip C. Brooks
City Editor............Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor.......... Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor............Herbert E. Vedderl
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor............. Ross WV. Ross
Assistant City Editor.... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson Marion McDonald
Margaret Arthur Richard H. Milroy
Emmons A. Bonfield Charles S. Monroe
an Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Churceh Harold L. Passman
Clarence N. Edelson Morris W. Quinn
Margaret Gross Rita Rosenthal
Valborg Egeland Pierce Rosenberg
Marjorie Follmer Edward J. Ryan
James B. Freeman David Scheyer
Robert J. Gessner Eleanor Scribner
Elaine E. Gruber Corinne Schwarz
Alice Hagelshaw Robert G. Silbar
Joseph E. Howell IowardGF. Simon
J. Wallace Hushen Rowena Stillman
Charles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby George Tilley
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Tack I. Lait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling
Yohm. H. Maloney

'31 will have an opportunity to try its
mettle in the manifold fields of cam-
pus activity. Outstanding among these
enterprises which call for tryouts at
this time are the three campus publi-
cations-The Daily, the Gargoyle, and
the Michiganensian-offering experi-
ence in both editorial work and busi-
ness management.
The Gargoyle offers experience on
a monthly periodical. Tryouts will
be held on both the editorial and
business sides of this publication
where the work largely consists of
gaining a grasp of the style and na-
ture of the organization preparatory
to taking over more serious respon-
sibility next fall. The Michiganensian,
the second of the group, is one of the
very best of college annuals, offering
a far different type of experience
from either The Daily or the Gargoyle,
and requiring considerably less time
than The Daily. On the editorial side
the work consists of both artistic ex-
perience and organization work, much
as on the Gargoyle, with the exception
that the actual wrting of stories plays
a larger part in the humor magazine
than in the annual.
The Daily will naturally attract the
largest number, offering as it does the,
chance for students to receive prac-
tical newspaper experience under con-
ditions closely paralleling those of
the largest metropolitan dailies. A
member of the Associated Press and
a subscriber to a national feature
service, The Daily has stood out in
the past as a pioneer in the ranks of
college journalism.
All three of the publications offer
what is undoubtedly one of the most
valuable phases of experience in prac-

TED ROL
CARE FOR
FRESHMIEN
TitE BUTTERFIELD INTERESTS
are again cooperating with the Uni-
versity by displaying a picture which
gives the best sort of information to
our new freshmen. The picture is,
"Stark Lov' and is playing at the
Wuerth.
* * *
THE WUERTH ADVERTISES "Of%
all the pictures available, this one
was selected for Freshman Week."
No doubt they feel that freshmen in
particular and students in general)
need edueation in the art of keeping
a father from taking away their
sweethearts. ,
WHEN THEY MENTION "of all the!
pictures available," it occurs to us
that they probably had the choice oft
"Stark Love" or the big movie taken
on the campus a few months ago, and1
of course, being somewhat rational
they chose the better of the two.
* s *
I I
TRYOUTSt
Since all the other publica-
tions on the campus are calling
or tryouts, Rolls also enters
the field of competition. Valuable
Iexperience in writing humor,
news stories, advertising and
publicity may be had with work
on Rolls. Anyone is eligible
and all are requested to meet at
the Rolls office, at any time.

_R-AE -

THEATER
BOOKS
MUSIC

Iii

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"TA XI-TfA X"
MARIAN NIXON
"Sta nCl" at ihe l iano
Soon--TlE d"M13
This "Ad" with t0c w I admit
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Your Valentine Is "Different"
Not the ordinary gift for her-you know that she would love:
ACap Boutonniere,
A Delicate Hanlie
A Pair of Pendant Earings
A Brillian Braceiet
You will chose the Winning Valentine in
THE RUBLEY SHOPPE
Nickels Arcade

mn *rfV 7rrit_ Fitt,.,

E

BUSINESS STAFF tica lines that a University studen
Telephone 21214 can gain. As is only requisite in re
BUSINESS MANAGER taining their high standard, all thre
WILLIAM C. PUSCH are operated on the mrit system, of
Assistant Manager... George H. Annable, Jr. fering junior positions which pay sal
aries and senior positions of high r
-Advertising...............Richard A. Meyer sponsibility and considerable mon
Advertising ..Atur M.LHinkle tary reward. To the student wh
Advertising................Edward L. Hulsetayrwd. T thsuen wh
Advertising............John W. Ruswinckel wishes to add to his college educatio
Accounts................Raymond Wachter
Circulation..............George B. Ahn, Jr. an extremely practical side either i
Publication.................Harvey Talcott business management or editoria
Assistants bsns aaeeto dtra
George Bradley Ray lofelich work, there are few finer opportuni
1Mlarie Brunneler hal A. Jaehn
James Carpenter James Jordan ties than those offered by the thre
Charles K. Correll M\Iarion Kerr publications of the University.
Barbara Cromell Thales N. Lenington __
Mary Dively Catherine M\lcKinven
Bessie V.eEgeland Dorothy Lyons
Ona Kn Felker Alex K. Scherer
Katherine rohne eog r rCAMPUS OPINION
Douglass Fuller Rath ThompsonN N
Beatricer Greenberg Herbert \. Varnum i Annonymous communications will be
Helen Gross Lawrence Walkley disregarded. The names of communi-
;. J.. Hammer Hannah Wallen cants will, however, be regarded as
Carl W. Hammer confidential upon request. Letters pub-
ished should not be construed as ex-
'FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1928 pressing the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
Night Editor - PAUL J. KERN DORMITORY ADVANTAGES
--_ITo the Editor:
The viewpoint taken in yesterday'
PLAYING DOWN paper on "Rooming Houses Versu
Two and three years ago the dra- Dormitories" by an unjustly indignan
rnatic situation on te campus was "Student's Mother" can meet nothin
little developed but full of promise. but opposition. This is just the chanc
Various organizations had arisen I have been seeking or two years.
from the genuine need of any group
to dabble in dramatics, and their
bents were gradually being turned to in a league house, a typical one
projects that were more and more Now as a junior, privileged to live i
worthy of their attention and that of a dormitory, I look back on that yea
their audiences. The audiences them-
selves increased, the frequency of the as a nightmare, two semesters o
productions were enlarged, and the hoor the full effects of which I
scope of the works attempted grew could not realize in my innocent an
likewise. Occasional productions at verdant gullibility. However, to g
the regular theaters in the city were into the fuller details would tak
few enough to justify this interest.
The applause was shared by actors yards of print.
and patrons alike. In yesterday's article the rooming
Tshouse mother asked Dr. Little for
The last two years have seen a re- proof of overcharge for rooms.I
markable and unworthy change in all
. .~ paid one hundred ten dollars formy
this, with the result that universitys frm
share fadberomwhiad
entertainment seekers are assailed on quateaclotpeoawsilem
evey sdewit oporunt.e . quate closet space, a single smal
every side with opportunities of wobbly study table, and a bit o
spending their money. The frequency furniture for a dresser which dated
of the productions has been multiplied back nearly fifty years. There was
many times and even the price has
never hot water. T'rho landlady's
been boosted.
young son and daughter kept us
There is one factor, however, that awake during the day, and her year
seems to have been overlooked by the old son kept us up at night. My room
sponsors of campus dramatics, which in one of the well known dormitories
is no less than their original purpose. now is a single room, the acme of
The exceeding length of time that plays comfort and costs thirty dollars less.
run, coupled with the type of enter- Material inconveniences would not
tainments that are being offered, have mean a great deal, however, providing
given rise to the plaint on the part of that the associations and companions
students and faculty alike that the produced the proper atmosphere
venture has assumed a brilliant com- necessary for a freshman. I can not
mercial hue. say that conditions were such as to
No greater, evil, or one more pre- strengthen high standards or ideals,
judicial to the future of dramatic so- as the environment of college life
cieties at Michigan can be fou~nd than should do.
this. Its growth is being viewed with The opportunity of living first in
alarm in some quarters but little else, a league house and then in a dormi-
There is little justification for a tory is not a common one. As a mem-
campus stock company, giving itself ber of the privileged few, I feel that I
almost entirely to the common run of have had a decided advantage in hav-
stock drama, such as is seen in any ing viewed these two sides of college
mid-western town with all the flour- life. I can but say that the dormitory
ishes of bargain matinees and amateur is the superior type.
nights. The cry of the backers has It has been argued that "keeping
been that nothing else will appeal to league houses is the only way to de-
,he audiences, thus slapping the in- rive financial support" for some who
tellectual interests of the University wish a college education. All stu-
squarely in the face. dents are in sympathy with this, I am
If students are not interested in sure. However, a system which al-
better plays and dramatic experi- lows such extreme conditions to go
ments it is time to dissolve the agen- unchanged and unnoticed should be
cies themselves. If commercial gain accorded some discussion.
is the only end the societies would do Only my sincerest support can fol-
better to hold bazaars or sell maa- low the request which President Lit-

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* * *
IT SEEMS THAT MOST of the pro-
fessors in this institution are in
league with the bookstores. We don't
mind buying a few books now and1
then, but when we have to buy five
or six for a course and the professor
tells us that each student must have
his own copies of the books, we be-
gin to wonder just what the prof's
royalty is.
* * *
THEN THERE ARE THOSE other
profs. who assign a new book every
semester and thus eliminate the pos-
sibility of second hand texts. They
also are a menace to the poor strug-
gling student.
* * *
THERE IS ONE TYPE of professor
whom we excuse. He is the one who
assigns the book that he, himself, hasj
written. It is a well known fact that
men must eat, and also that this is
the only way professors' books can
be sold. Accordingly, we excuse sev-
eral members of the faculty.
* * *
FROM THE DAILY WANT A)S
FOUNTAIN PEN SERVICE
Better have your Fountain Pen lookedI
over now at Rider's Pen shop. You
will want them in good shape for
exams.
-Yesterday's Daily
* * *
YES, AS THE BOY Scouts say, "Be
Prepared." There is nothing like be-
ing prepared well in advance.
* * *
FOR RENT
Large front suite, suitable for two or
three boys well lighted. 735 Haven,
corner of Hill.
- * * * '
IF THEY MEAN WHAT we think
they mean the correct word it is not
"lighted" but "lit."
* * s
THERE CAME TO OUR notice
some time ago a book called "The
College Cut-Up," written by DeWitt
C. Millen. He requested that we re-
view it. We suppose that he expects
to stimulate the sale of the book
through our comment.
* * *
THE AUTHOR SAYS THAT he isS
a war veteran, and therefore nothing
that we say can penetrate far enough
to hurt his feelings.
* * *
THE BOOK CONSISTS of a series of
letters written by a boy at college toi
his father, that is he has copied the
style of "Daddy Long Legs."
* * *
IT SEEMS THAT THE author has
hit the college style rather well. The

TUWaIGT: The Rockford Players
present "One of the Family" in the
Whitney theater at S:15 o'clock.
TONIGHT: Play Production present
Lulu Volliner's "Sun-Up" in the
Mimes theater at 8:30 o'clock.
* **
"hELL BENT FOR hEAVEN" ,
A review, by Vincent Wall
A second folk play of the South-.
ern Mountains-this time the Hatch-
er Hughes Pulitzer Prize Play, "Hell
Bent Fer Heaven"- was presented
last -night by Play Production. And
the resulting performance, although
very uneven in spots seemed to
please the rather small audience.
"Hell Bent Fer Heaven" is an in-
teresting study of religious fanati-
cism-which according to our drama-
tists seems to be a psychological in-
teger of the hill-billys' complex. It
is done without the sentimentality
and confusions of thought which
mark Miss Vollmer's work of the
evening before, and on the whole is
a better specimen of the drama.
There are three acts of semi-melo-
drama and in all of them the interest
is well sustained.
The cast as a whole seemed to pos-
sess an intelligent conception of the
play, and even mastered to some de-
gree of supposed accuracy the diffi-
cult dialect. Several of them could
and did act. The only fault to find
is that in several crucial instances
the action was allowed to falteP and
drag, when it was particularly vital
to the success of the play.
Truesdale Mayers in the role of
Rufe Pryor carried the show, and pre-
sented as good a bit of acting as
Mimes theater has seen in some time.j
Two scenes of religious hysteria were
given weil and his complete effect
varied yet consistent. Walter Power
as Andy Lowry would have been goodI
if he had known his part better. And
Marjorie Chavenelle presented an ex-
cellent bit in the drab and pathetic;
figure of Meg munt.
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
There will be few who will mourn
the departure of "One of the Family"
-that awful debacle of American
home life-from the Whitney theater.
It was just another of those unfor-
tunate affairs that occur in the life
of the most astute managers.
On the other hand there will be
many to rejoice at the advent of
"Great Catherine" and "The Old Lady
Shows Her Medals" tomorrow night.
It is a rather daring thing to attempt
-this mixing of the irony of Shaw
and the gientle whimsies of Barrie.
But there is sufficient merit for either
to stand alone; and if the peculiarly
static dramas of Barrie do become a
bit tiresome, the bluff and witty
horseplay of Shaw will prove an ex-
cellent foil.

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"FATHER AM) DADS"
A review, by J. Stewart Hooker
Gay MacLaren is more than a
dramatist, more than a mere play in-
terpreter: she is an artist. Possessing
a flexible charm that protuded far be-
yond the footlights, this "one woman
theatrical company" charmed her au-
dience in Hill auditorium last night
with the presentation of her own
play, "Father and Dad."
Adequately portraying the 10 char
acters - of her own creation with
obvious grace and understanding,
Miss M cLaren moved smoothly and
swiftly through her intensely human
play of modern youth. While, by her
own confession, the play lacks many
of the magnamious thrills which make
Broadway playgoers come back for
more, the artistry and sincerity of her
performance left little to be desired.
One wonders at the conclusion of
the xerformance if it was not the
homely philosophy of Aunt Elsie and
the caucous slang of 16-year-old
Stanley aiter all that captured the
fancy. At least, with a minimum
amount of effort, Miss MacLaren puts
herself in the background, after the
fashion o a true artist, and lets her
characters do the work.
Thoroughly modern, the play 1 as
to do both with the problens of pa-j
rents with live children to rear, as
well as with the tribulations of the
parents betwixt themselves. BothE
ideas are carried out with clear un-
standing and a gracious absence of
moralizing. It is so modern that even!
the set of pearls cost $25,000! But
one is willing to overlook the minorI
flaws in the play for its greater mer-
its. Incidentally, the distribution of
programs was an improvement.
*i -**

z
e hea
04U
of p1q

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jj
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an pair of heels 2
Tft he mi,

YEA lS ago, P. A, showed a ce
AY Y ' YiYN SkYin -e c 'L i

boy is always writing home for money
and relating interesting stories of
college life. The book should have a
wide sale among parents intending
to send their children to college.
* * *
THE ONLY DIFFICULTY is that if
the parents take the book seriously
and realized that it is close to the*
truth, the registration in our Ameri-
can universities will fall off con-
siderably.
* * *
ON THE OTHER HAND the book
will 7 h Iar vrI a ln a In "E

LO Ul iCC n. s main-
tained its lead ever since putting more distance
behnd it every year. There must be a reason
why P. A. is the world's largest-selling brand.
There IS! Open a tidy red tin and get a full
breath of that class-by-itself fragrance. Then
tamp a oad into the bowl of your pipe and
Eight up. The first pull tells you whymore men
smoke P.A. than any other brand. Cool and
smooth and mellow and mild-not for one
p-iepoad, but always. Try this long-burning
toba co, Fellows, You'll say so?

win nevern ave a wide safe among
college students because it is just
what they write home. Some of them

:I ,

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. 1:111IMMI -M M= 19,111 1116 ?h'fili (Tft 117 I

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