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December 15, 1927 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-15

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PAGE FOUr

TI--I MTCICAN DAlY

TJIUISDA. DCEMIEII 15.1927

...... . .....

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Copference Editorial
Association.
They Associated Press is exclusively en-
ctilted to the use for republication of all news
ispatches creditedrto it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entex'ed at the postoffice at ttip Arbor,
iehigan, assecond class matter. Special rate
4fpostage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mpster Qengral.
Suscri aLion by carrier, $4,oo; by mail,
Offices Ann Arbor Press .Building, May-
.tard Street.
Phones tEditorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF,
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
: tor... .......... ...Ellis B. Merry
itor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor............ ..Philip C. Brooks
City Iditor.............Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor...........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor............Ierbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music. Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
relegraph Editor...........Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Fditor... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
,,bert F. Irinch G. Thomas McKean
Stewart hooker lenneth G. Patrick
flaul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
esther Anderson John. 11. Maloney
Margaret Arthur Marion McDonald
Emmons A. -Bonfield Richard H. Milroy
Stratton Duck Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Church Harold L. Passman
William B. Davis Morris W. Quinn
Clarence N. Edelson Rita Rpsenthal
Margaret Gross Piered Rosenberg
Valborg Egelaiid Edward J. Ryan
Marjorie Follmer David Sheyer
James 1B. Freeman Eleanor Scribner
Robert J. Gessner Corinne Schwarz
Elaine E. Gruber Robert G Silbar
Alice Hagelshaw Howard F. Simnon
Joseph 1:. Howell George E. Simons
J. Wallace Hushen Rowena Stillman
Charles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby George Tillev
Lawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Donald J. Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Sally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Jack L. Lait, Jr. Josephf Zwerdling

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
Assistant Manager.... George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising.......:.......Richard A. Meyer
Advertising...............Arthur M. Hinkley
Advertising ............. Edward L. Hulse
Advertising ............John W. Ruswinckel
Accounts .............. Raymond Wachter
Circulation........... George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication..................Harvey Talcott
Assistants
Fred Babcock Hal A. Jaehn
George Bradley James Jordan
Marie Brumler Marion Kerr
James 0. Br'wn Dorothy Lyons
fames 11. Coopev Thales N. Lenington
Charles K. (orrell Catherine McKinven
Rarbarp Cromell W. A. Mahaffy
Helen Dancer Fran~cis' Patrick
Mary Diveq George M. Perrett
Bessie U. ,Egeland, Alex .1. Scherei
Oia Felker. a *Frank Schuler
Ben 1 ishiinin Bernice Schook
Katherine Frochne Mary Slate
Douglass Fuller George Seater
BeatriL Greenberg Wilbert Stephenson
H elen Gross Ruth Thompson
erbert Goldberg 'erb>ert k. v arnuin
E. J. Hammer Lawrence Walkley
Carl W. Hammer Hannah Wailer

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collegiate sports can hold that less
competition induces more interest, and
in the face of this fact the action of
the Syracuse board looks tremend-
ously like mere hypocrisy. If it is a
fact that Syracuse is unwilling to
maintain athletic teams which are not
self-supporting, a frank statement
would have been much more satisfac-
tory than their suspicious subterfuge;
and if it is true that Syracuse is
abolishing tennis, boxing, golf, hockey,
wrestling, soccer, fencing, and rifle
in order to release its students to in-
tramural competition, why aren't foot-
ball, basketball, baseball, and track
included in the reform?
OKLAHOMA
One of the most curious incidents
enacted In American parliamentary
annals in recent years is occurring in
Oklahoma, where the governor of the
state, Henry Johnson, has forbade the
state legislature to meet and has call-
ed the state militia to prevent such a
meeting. The situation that far is
unique, but it has approached the point
ludicrous when the legislature decid-
ed to meet clandestinely to impeach
the governor.
When the whole affair is over, the
iron-handed governor will undoubt-
edly find himself rather rudely de-
posited in the Oklahoma City railroad
station with his suitcase in his hand
and a one way ticket home in his
pocket. Governor Jack Walton, of the
same state, it will be remembered,
tried the same method only three
years ago with the result that he be-
came a "former-governor" as soon as
the legislature did meet.
Johnson is committing political
suicide by his strong arm tactics in
this case, just as surely as the im-
peached-governor Walton ended his
gubernatorial career by the similar act.
Any attempt to bully the duly elected
representatives of the people is bound
to be disastrous, and whether the Su-
preme Court of Oklahoma staves off
the impeachment until a regular ses-
sion or allows it to proceed at the
present session, and whether or not
Johnson is guilty of the charges of
corruption preferred, there is one
thing certain, and that is that the po-
litical career of Henry Johnson ended
when the state militia barred the
entrance of the state representatives
to their legislative chambers.
STABILITY
The communists have gained the
helm in Shanghai, and what promises
to be a thoroughly "red" government
has been set up in that city. American
gunboats and artillery have been hur-
ried to the scene, but curiously enough
the communists turned out to have
a perfect respect for foreigners and
their goods, and not a single Ameri-
can possession or subject has been
molested. This is truly a remarkable
record for a Chinese insurrection.
In spite of a natural and inborn
fear of communists and similar mani-
acs, even sane Americans may be
forced to admit that under the cir-
cumstances a power and stable com-
munist government is better for
Shanghai than the continual up-
heaval of the past months. There
seems to be very little cause for
alarm in the "red" control of Shang-
hai, and if they are able 'to bring
order from chaos, and government
from revolution, more power to them.
CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub
lished should not be construed as ex-

pressing the editorial Opinion of-The
Daily.
COMPARING DECISIONS
To the Editor:
Not to question the wisdom or folly
of the Automobile Ruling in the least,
we do wonder why one young man
was expelled from the University and
another suspended for the remainder
of the year for breaking the automo-
bile ruling while two other young men
were merely placed on probation for
having been guilty of breaking the
Volstead Act. We question the fairness
of placing so much more severe penal-
ty on the breaking of a University
ruling than on the breaking of a State
and Federal law.
We also wonder if there were as
much interest, energy, and money
spent in the enforcement of the Vol-
stead Act on this campus as there is
spent in the enforcement of the auto-
mobile ruling if the fraternity parties
would not lose some of their un-
healthy publicity throughout the State
and the morals of the University stu-
dents be improved.
--Mike and Ike.

//E
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FROSH BOLT FRUS J.IA N1Wf k
-WRA-
* * *
TILLOTSON GREETS PARENTS
AT STADIUM DEDICATION
SALP'
HOBBS BACK FROM GREENLAND
* *i *
PRESIDENT LITTLE ASKS
STUDENT COOPERATION TO
ENFORCE AUTOMOBLE BAN
UJSE 'OL P
owa Jus7e 6)T
d
COACH EMERY IS JLIRE)
AS ASSISTANT-TO-'I'IE-1) EA N

TON [GlT: Play Production pre-
sent.,; the final performance of "The
j ~ n rtten nt~rnistlv " ~ a 1in a'

Ray Hotelich

THEATER
B OOK S
M USIC

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OFFICE. n
IN CAMPUS 11OIE
-* *1,

IS4IOW

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER

15, 1927

Romlantic Young 1Lay to the ximes
theater at S:30 o'clock.
THE GLEE CLUB AND BAND
CONCERT
A review, by Harold May
The band, the Glee club, and Pres-
ident Little- In these three we had,
last night, our college days all before
us: On the one hand, in the band, we
had our football days, with the chal-
lenging note ringing down to us
through a long series of sentimental
and reminiscing years; on the other,
in the Glee club our skylarking days,
in which we tried, by the use of
boistrousness and song, to convince
ourselves that we were gay and
dashing fellows over all, ordering all,
a nd with no uncertain hand, chasten-
ing the foolish ardour of our songs,
systemizing our daily lives so that we
should not go astray, we had, in Pres-
ident Little, our every days. The con-
cert, of which I am speaking, was
good, but it was long-too long. Lives
there a man who has not hear the
overture to Rienzi at least ten times,
by as many different military bands,
and where is the person who has not
been present an equal number of
times at the "levee" of the Southern
and delectable "Miss Lindy."
Marshall L. Byrn gave a cornet
solo "Commodore Polka" in which he,
demonstrated the usual ability to
finger dextrously and, likewise, to tri-
ple tongue; his lip, however, showed I
painfully the effects of the strenuous
football season, and prevented him
from reaching any very high notes
or from getting a very clear tone. The
band presented two other soloists, H.
IK. Becker, flutist, who played the
flute admirably-for an engineer, and
Franck Mercier, who played "Polka
Euphonios" on his doubled barreled
lbaritone.
The Glee club sang their usual num-
bers in their usual, really very fine,
manner. They attained a very drama-
tic effect by singing "Silent Night"
with the lights out. (They could have
attained the same effect by singing it
standing on their heads, such is the
power of our Sunday-School days.)
President Little exposed his worried
self long enough to wish us a Merry
Christmas, and to inspire us on our
way to becoming leaders.
* * *
"THE ROMANTIC YOUNG LADY"
A review, by Dave Scheyer
In our sophmoric experience as a
Mimes play-goer we have seen poorer
plays and poorercasts than this, but
never such an unparallel combination
of the two as was displayed in "The
Romantic Young Lady" made known
by Play Production last night.
We don't know who translated Sier-
ra's work, but we"suspect it to be the
work of some member of the Spanish
department. Only loyalty to the dear
old Alma Mater could account for the
choice of this show as Play Produc-
tion's first public idramatic effort of
the year.u
The play concerns a young Spanish
girl's hopes for freedom and equality
with her brothers (three gentlemen
who are, incidentally, uniformly ter-
rible). The romantic novelist Felipe
de Cordoba falls in love with her and
she with him and after two acts of the
usual misunderstandings, almost fun-
ny scenes and epigrammatic dialogues,
the affair ends in the usual clinch.
The first act was by far the worst;
so bad in fact that Professor Jack,
arbiter of campus culture, got up and
walked out. 'If he had stayed for
the next two, his opinion of Play Pro-
ductions might have risen about two
per cent, but we doubt it.
. Helen Workmen as the Spanish
flapper was, to use the time-honored

word, "adequate." Charles Green, de-
picting the Spanish novelist, had at
times an easy air that fitted in well
with the part, but the fact that he is
a speech professor showed in his con-
tinual, sweeping, maddening gestures.
Dorothy Shore, as Irene the secretary,
was the most pleasing of all the act-
ors, being sophisticated and beautiful
-a combination to win any critic's
heart. As a general criticism of the
cast we can only say that they had a
general air of nervous expectancy,
sitting on the edges of their chairs as
though wondering, "Is my line next?"
If we are overly harsh with Play
Productions, it is because one can
really expect better things of them.
Even without talent, their direction
of professional calibre should have
done some good, and certainly con-
sidering the period during which "The
Romantic Young Lady" has been in
rehearsal, the cast should have known
their parts. Last night they very
obviously did not.

_____ ~Sere
F ~Ch~ris
Rider's "Masterpen," a complete
$6.oo to $30.oo each; Eversharps in sets
Pretty Christmas wrappir
Rider's P
315 Sti
g Y Seri

Merry Xmas and

a Prosperous New Year
Graham Book Stores
at both ends of the diagonals

:X

TaaIP ~~J.?J ?~~u~rJJ

t

.

The Mary Louise Shop
wishes a joyful Christmas
to all.
For the gift you've for-
gotten to buy, stop in on the
way to your train. Prompt
service'. A suitable gift for
every purse and person.
Mary Louise Shop
Nickels Arcade

Somewhere To Go
during the
Chri~stmasVacation
HARRIS HALL

vice
assortme
or singh
ng witho
Oen
ate St.
vice

11

nas
nt of Wahls Desk Sets from
e. Largest stock in the State.
ut extra charge.
Shop

Night Editor---ROBERT E. FINCH
SYRACUSE lN TERROR
Contrary to the general trend of
intercoliegiate athletics, the govern-
ing body, of Syracuse university has
decided to drop from the roster of
intercollegiate compeition eight minor
sports, giving as the reason the fact
that not enough men are enabled to
compete on these teans; In place of
the minor sports teams the governing
board proposes to introduce a system
of intramural athletics in which all
of the student body can participate.
Whether the governing board is de-
ceiving itself or whether it is attempt-
ing to deceive the general public is
somewhat beside the point; but one
thing is certain-that the idea of in-
creasing interest by reducing compe-
tition is false. The surest way to in-
hibit all interest in college athletics
is to remove it entirely from the
sphere of competition, and to remove
the goal of possible participation on a
Varsity team which stands as an in-
centive at 'rresent to the men who
otherwise couldn't find additional re-
'Ward in intramural sports.
In the Western Conference, at the
present time, the trend is decidedly
in the opposite direction-and the sys-
tem is showing results. Since the in-
auguration of hockey, wrestling, and
other phases of minor sports competi-
tion hundreds of men have tried out
for Varsity teams who could not
otherwise ha,e been reached. At the
present time we are about to try the
experiment .of increased competition
on a grand scale with games for our
reserve football team, and it is almost
a certainty that the number of men
reporting fo'r football next fall will be
larger than for years in the past.
It is neither our prerogative nor
our busi,eSs;, but if we were to ascribe
off-hand 'a416eive for the action of the
Syracuse -boar-d we should certainly
say that it looks mightily as though
they are trying to avoid the expense
of the minor sports without daring to
say as nici. If their object is to gain
a largcri participation in. sports, their
only h e is inIe'ased competition for
their teim--and experience proves
+ a Z, ,'r .ar v ls: .nrn a Cvr |

per manenLave
Clhe rno b
Up0 odb.~

(Cor. State and Huron)
Sunday, Dec. 18--6:15 P. M. Supper "and
Carols.
Tuesday, Dec. 20-7:00 P. M. Bridge Party
Wednesday, Dec. 21-4:00 P. M. Tea.
Christmas Day-6:00 P.M. Christmas arty
(Phone 8613 if you intend to come)
Tuesday Dec. 27-7:00 P. M. Bridge Party
Wednesday, Dec. 28-4:00 P. M. Afternoon
Tea.

.. ,..__ .r... -..w...

u2ra1"'cJZm.

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14

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COEDS TREAT AT PAN-HELLIC
WITHROW AINKES PERFECT FLOP
ROLLS ADVOCATES FOOLPROOF
LOCOMOTION FOR NEW COP
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Make an appointment today for
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"We Are Experts"
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MICHIGAN
BEAUTE SHOPPE
Michigan Theater Bldg.
Phone 3VS3

*

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INTERFRAT OFFICERS USE
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2S AD
e * *t

1.

.IIMES PRESENTS ANNUAL OPERA

I

American forces have landed in
Shanghai again. Evidently the boys
are preparing for a Christmas on land
this year.
Michigan it seems will soon have a

kl', w

I

OPERA CHORINE TALKS SHOP

III

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