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December 15, 1927 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-15

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rTUnRDAY., DECEMBE1R 15,1921

"I HE MICIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

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HAll TALKS tN WEST VIEW SHOWING DAMAGE DONE BY J H~jinsdale Traces Paths Of Early Indians
IJLL ~ STRM CCURNG DUIY OnMa ps Of Original Michigan Surveyors
INDIN ANHROOLOG j ONVOERSINCRAS Trailing the paths hreon the ab- on the site of Scio, Dr. Hinsdale has
INDIN AN HRO OLOG .,oiinees of Michigan unleashed their discovered an important Indian center
IRE I {tsr Nonvoers are miceased by 3 oper ontirofequtprpst w e four trails converged at a con-
BEFORELCLCU huhuad ftcvtn ouain~i f~,~*,~~~
32 per hu nti gro u tnr an ofattle, D r.i ve n e e tof o e lra ing suro

GEOGRAPHY PROFESSOR SAYS
ISLANDS ARE EXCELLENT
FIELD FOR STUDY
HAS TRAVELED IN INDIES
Declares Cultures' Of African Peoples
From Gambia Tb Mozambique Are
Fused To Those Of Europe
An address was given last night be-
fore the Anthropology club by Prof.
Hall of the geography department on
certain population groups in the West
Indies. Dr. Hall has made two trips$
in recent years to the West Indian
islands of Gonaue, Vache, Haitai, the
Virgin Islands, and Porto Rico. He
made studies on those occasions of
these different peoples and secured
first hand information" together with
many excellent photographs.
Professor Hall declared that the
West Indies offer a most interesting
study to the student of anthropology
because of the highly complex racial
and cultural background. The cul-
tures of the people of Africa from
Gambia to Mozambique are fused with
those of the different groups of west-
ern Europe.
Islands Changed Hands.
The history of the West Indies dates
from the discovery of America when
the commercial nations of the world
entered into the fight for possession
of these areas. Different plans of oc-
cupations were attempted and the in-
troduction of African slaves followed.
In places, the Indians were abolished
whiledin other places, they were ab-
sorbed. Most islands changed hands
a number of times, and as a result,
many racial and cultural combin-
ations are to be seen today in the peo-
ple and their customs.
The island of Gonaue is an isolated
and little known island of some 300
square miles and 10,000 people. To it,
the Iidians from Hispanola and the
"maroon" negroes fled. Due to isola-
tion, they have developed their own
culture to a large extent. The most
unique feature here is the develop-
ment of highly organized and strong-
ly centralized labor societies. These
organizations are ruled by empresses
and emperors. They have their own
histories, music, and flags. The sys-
tem is called the Societe' Congo.
EngllshI s Language.
In the St. Thomas Islands, English
has remained the language of the
negro groups, in spite of 300 years of
Danish occupation. A smal.l group of
French are found here who have kept
themselves apart for three centuries.
Professor Hall illustrated his lec-
ture with steroptican slides of the
photographs he obtained while in the
islands.
rinting. Engraving

every presidential election, according
to a remarkable study of voting be-
havior in the state of California made
by Prof. Charles H. Titus of the Uni-
versity of Southern California.
This study, conducted in 22 of the
most representative cities of the State,
shows an amazing decline in the rel-
ative number of ballots cast at each
election, with the largest cities of the
! state listed as by far the worst offend-
ers.
The study made by Professor Titus,
who is a member of the political
science department of the University
of Southern California, covers the
period from 1900 to 1924. In compil-
ing his statistics he was aided by the
communities in checking up the vote
from one election to another. The
outstanding fact indicated by the study
is that the larger the city the smaller
i the relative vote cast in each election.
As the cities grow in size, mounting
from class "E" to class "A," the rel-
ative voting strength drops steadily as
the population rises. In the 1900 elec-
tion for president, the class A cities
showed a voting strength of 618 per
thousand of voting population, while
the class E cities showed a turnout of
693 of each thousand voters. In 1912
class "A" cities showed a vote of 383
I per thousand and "E" cities 493 per
thousand of voting population. In
1920 the vote stood at 430 for every
1,000 voters in class "A" cities, and
521 for the class "E" cities.

ology at the University, has been con-
ducting researches during the past
month on the original surveyor's
maps of this state, on file at Lansing.
The federal surveyors sent to this
state in the first half of the 19th cen-
tury carried instructions to note on
their maps all important features of
the terrain, including Indian trails.
Dr. Hinsdale has traced the trails, as
noted by the surveyors, on the maps of
each township, in order to discover
missing pieces, and to connect up theI
trails about which it is already known.
These tractings he has brought backI
to Ann Arbor for study and coordin-;
ation.I
Dr. ilinsdale has already mapped
the trunk lines which the red men
used in their more extended travels.
They had a well-marked turnpike be-
tween Detroit and Chicago, none
other than U.S. 23, via Ypsilanti and
Saline, which was a spur of the
"Great Trail" coming from the coun-
try of the Delawares around Chesa-
peake Day. The "Grand River Trail"
proved to be the most popular route
for Indians commuting under their
own power between Detroit and hunt-
ing grounds around Grand Rapids, and
it has remained so to the present time,
being designated in up-to-date termin-
ology as UT.S. 16. Three major trails
lcd to the summer resort country
about Traverse City, Charlevoix, Mack-
inaw, and Cheboygan, where the red
men doubtless found relaxation in pur-
suing prospective meals through the
summery north woods.
To the north and west of Ann Arbor,

have led him to believe there existed
a community of some size. He has
also found that Packard avenue is on
the site of an older route between
Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti, while a
second lay between Packard and what
is now Washtenaw avenue, coming in-
to town where Washtenaw now does.
The Washtenaw fraternities, so-called,
line a memorial Indian right of way.j
Historical Indian sentiment has
come into conflict with twentieth cen-
tury practicality to the northeast of
Ann Arbor, where the old Potowatomie
trail parallels the Huron for several
miles. Dr. Hinsdale, in an effort to
revive the Indian name, secured per-
mission from the country road commis-
sioner to place signs along the road,
bearing the inscription "Potowatomie
Trail." Subsequently avowing that no
one could remember such a name, the
commissioner removed the signs from
the public right of way °

LISTS REVEAL TOTAL OF
CHINESE STUDENT THESESt
Publication of the list of theses and
Sdmissertations of the Chinese students
'in American colleges and auniversities;
by the Chinese Institute of America,
reveals that from the year 1902 until
the present time 568 theses have been
composed by Chinese students in this
country. Fully one-fifth of these deal
with problems directly relative to
China, while the remaining cover an
extensive field ranging from a survey
of national politics to aviation.
Four Michigan men are included i
the booklet. Under the 1919 category,
W. S. Chang, PhD., is listed with his
thesis on "The Significance and So
Limitations of Hegel's Ethics"; Ding-
Sai Chen, M.A., is in the 1922 group
and has written on "The Principles
of State Succession as Revealed by
the Versailles Treaty"; and Finchen
Sang Ni, SeD., is also listed in 1922,
with his paper "The Active Response
of Frogs, Tadpoles, Fish, Bats, and
Men to Various Forms of Excite-
ment"; 1926 includes Ju-Mel Yang,
PhD., who wrote "Good Will and Other
Intangibles: Their Significance and
Treatment in Accounts."

Here are the first pictures of a damage done by a gale that wrecked
buildings at Wineville, Cal., and covered the community with a heavy drift
of sand. Above, a roof, intact, but lacking a house, deposited in one man's
back yard. Below, a resident digging two feet down to find his front lawn.

FACULTY MEN TO immediately after Christmas.
AT TEND A lE tNG Among those planning to go to the
Al TTEE IN meetingare Prof. Harrison M. Ran-
dall, director of the physics laboratory,
Several members of the faculty of Prof. Ralph H. Curtiss, director of the
the University will attend the joint observatory, Prof. Ernest F. Baker,
sessions of the American Phy'sical of the physics department and G. F.
Society and Section B of the American Brett, attending the University on a
Association for the Advancement of fellowship from the University of
Science to be held in Nashille, Tenn., Leeds in England.

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OFFICE, CORNWELL BLOCK
Phoncs, Office : 4551-4552 Yard Office : 5152

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Bring your laundry to us and leave it. It will be all ready
you on your return to school on Jan. 3rd.

THE MAIN STREET CASH GROCERY
215 North Main St. Phone 8111

Trout ..............30c

Halibut .......
Pickerel... ..
Whitefish......
Salmon .......

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Fresh Fillets ......... 30c
Herring, 2 lbs. ......25c
Perch ............25c
Also--All kinds smoked
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Cash "id Carry
White Swan Laundry Co.
Branch Office, Press Building, Opp. Maj Theatre
Open 7 a. m. t S p. m
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PARTY PROGRAMS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
INVITATIONS
STATIONERY
FOLDERS
NEWSLETTERS
PLACARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
CALLING CARDS
ETC., ETC.

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Phone 3231
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Second and Last Week
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Presents a New Musical
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England and the Old West
"WJUTE EAGLE"
Prices: Nights, $1.00 to $.50.
Matinees, $1.00 to $2.50, plus tax

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We put them up in pretty Christmas boxes or folders and
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All Seats Reserved

Box of
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Week Beginning Mon., Dec. 12
Sir Forbes-Robertson's Greatest
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