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December 14, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-14

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PA" FoUR

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S11. ~ f~urAM fiT " L VVAJ'.1-1'J~1 U L/I V 1 L.1I VYIDU NIJ

DAY. TlTCT\iBFU 14, 1 ^_;

7

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of, Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
ttiled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches creditedrto it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished' herein.
Entered at the postoffice at tnn Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate1
of postage granted; by Third Assistant Post-
mnster General.
Suscril.tion by carrier, $4,oo; by mail,
04. 50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 492 5
MANAGING EDITOR
JO H. CHAMBERLIN
Editor......................Ellis B. Merry
Editor Michigan Weekly.. Charles E. Behymer
Staff Editor..............,Philip C. Brooks
City Editor.. ...........Courtland C. Smith
Women's Editor..........Marian L. Welles
Sports Editor.............Herbert E. Vedder
Theater, Books and Music.Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Telegraph Editor... ..........Ross W. Ross
Assistant City Fditor... Richard C. Kurvink
Night Editors
Robert E. Finch G. Thomas McKean
J. Stewart Hooker Kenneth G. Patrick
Paul J. Kern Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Milton Kirshbaum
Reporters
Esther Anderson John ti. Maloney
Margaret Arthur Marion McDonald
Emmons A.Bonfield Richard H. Milroy
Stratton Luck Charles S. Monroe
Jean Campbell Catherine Price
Jessie Church Harrod L. Passman
William B. Davis Morris W. Quinn
'larence N. Edelson Rita Rosenthal
Margaret Gross Pierce Rosenberg
Valborg FEgeland Edward J. Ryan
%arjorie Follmer )avid Scheyer
fames 13. Freeman Eleanor Scribner
Robert J. Gessner Corinne Schwarz
Elaine E. Gruber Robert G. Silbar
Alice Hagelshaw oward F. Simon
f oseph IF- Howell George E. Simoons
J. Wallace Ilushen Rowena Stillman
,harles R. Kaufman Sylvia Stone
William F. Kerby George Tilley
Sawrence R. Klein Edward L. Warner. Jr.
)ormald' J Kline Benjamin S. Washer
Tally Knox Leo J. Yoedicke
Jack L. bait, Jr. Joseph Zwerdling

gram of song and musical numbers in
keeping with the spirit of Christmas
With the audience joining in with
the musicians in the various numbers,
a spirit should prevail that will make
the suggested plans for a similar con-
cert to be held before the Easter holi-
days, a certainty.
OIL
In the rapid progress of present day
civlization it is seldom that we realize
the tremendous responsibility which
humanity places in a single commod-
ity-oil. Without oil the United States
navy would be useless in its harbor;
aviation would cease; automotive
travel would be out of the question;
defensive warfare would be impossi-
ble; and the whole structure of hu-
man events would come toppling upon
us. Oil runs our ships, our trucks,
our airplanes, and is coming more and
more to heat our buildings. Though
little or nothing is indespensible, oil
closely approaches that description.
It is rather odd, in the face of this
situation, that though forest conser-
vation commissions have long been in
existence, and that though influential
men and organizations have long la-
bored for the preservation of other
natural resources, the question of oil
conservation has never, before the
present time, been brought into the
public eye. This condition has existed
in spite of the most shameful and
flagrant waste of our oil resources.
It should be with no small measure
of gratification, then, that the nation
views the recently appointed "Commit-
tee of Nine," chosen by Hubert Work,
secretary of the interior, which will
investigate the possibility of petrole-
um conservation. It is with double
satisfaction that the University should
view those selections, since Dean
Henry Bates of the Law school has
been chosen by Secretary Work as a
member of the "Committee of Nine,"
and the "Committee of Nine," includ-
ing four cabinet members, has chosen
Dean Bates as its chairman.
Truly the committee has an inspir-
ing opportunity to accomplish some-
thing really vital toward the preser-
vation of what is perhaps our most
important single resource. The whole
nation owes the body its best wishes
for the development of a plan which
will conserve a hitherto unconserved
resource.

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WILLIAM C. PUSCH
4ssrant Manager.... George H. Annable, Jr.
%dvertising .............ichard A. Meyer
kdvertising ...............Arthur M. Hinkley
Xdvertising............Edward L. Hulse
dvertisiag...... ....John W. Ruswinckel
Xccounts.................Raymond Wachter
Circulation.... ........George B. Ahn, Jr.
Publication..............Harvey Talcott
Assistants
Fred Babcock Hal A. Jaehn
George Bradley ames Jordan
Marie Brumler Marion Kerr
James v. Brown Dorothy Lyons
Janes B. Coope Thales N. Leningto
Charles K. (orrell Catherine McKinven
Barbara Cromell W. A. Mahaffy
Helen Dancer Francis Patrick
Mary Divery George M. Perrett
Bessie vI. gelanA Alex K. Scherer
Orna Felker Frank Schuler
Ben 1'islnnan Beicinee Schook
Katherine Frochne Mary Slate
Douglass Fuller George Spater
Beatrice Greenberg Wilbert Stephenson
Helen Gross Ruth Thompson'
Herbert Goldberg Herbert E, Varnum
E. . Hammer Lawrence Walkley
CarW. Hammer Hannah Waller
Ray Ho elich
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1927
Night Editor-PAUL J. KERN
0H1, MY
If never before, John Marshall was
given good reason to turn over in his
grave by the recent Free Press ed-
itorial appropriately entitled "Second
Thoughts on Senate Exclusions."
After consideration longer than
usual, it seems, this metropolitan or-
gan of opinion charged the Senate
with "figuratively kicking the consti-
tution out of the window" by refusing
to seat Messrs. Vare and Smith when
they recently appeared with their cer-
tificates of election.
.By taking such a step "without first
giving them a chance to be heard,
the upper house did violence to the
fundamental theory of American
justice that a peron under charges
is innocent until -he is proved guilty;
and so the body placed itself on an
ethical level with a gang of midnights
lynchers-"
In general, we are told, that the
Senate has directly attacked the prin-
ciple of representativ4 free govern-
ment by establishing ,such a "lawless
and vicious precedent."
It is certainly unfotunate that the
Free Press editorial writer did not
get an opportunity to see the constitu-
tion before the Senate kicked it out
of the window figuratively or other-
wise. Of course, anystudent of ele-
mentary political science could have;
told him that the Senate is the sole
'judge of the clections returns, and
qualifications of its own members.";
(U. S. (onst., Art L Sec. V.);
The mere fact that the upper house
have previously allowed members to
be seated before immediately there-
after expelling them for some un-
desirability changes the situation not
at all. Under the constitution, the
Senate has absolute authority to de-
termine the membership right of the
persons accredited to it.
While the comment coming from the
Nearby metropolis probably will not
be taken seriously, it may assist thet
gentlemen of the political science de- t
partment in brightening up their
classes, now apparently handicapped
S41--- rnt..r Ay,, c JhinV

. CATED ROLL
I ~I
_ i AIIGRAIONS
XIST E\1
The great student migration over
the Christmas holidays must be pre-
vented. The ultimatum was issued by
the Rolls Executive board after a spe-
cial session late yesterday afternoon.
"The Christmas migration makes
too great a break in student activ-
ities," declared Dawn, a recent ac-
quisition of the board. "College ro-
mances are shattered. Studies are in-
I terfered with. Everything is disrupt-
ed. To prevent these ills, we have de-
termined to stop such migrations."
* * *
"There is no god reason why stu-
dents should want to leave town dur.
ing the vacation," remarked Chairim
Smutz. "Simce we have thus far
escaped the full benefit of the Home
nd lone plan they can get all the
traveling they need during the foot-
hall season."
S* 'I *
"Students who go home will prob-
ably drive cars," said Kernel. "Even
though the auto rules will be relaxed
during the vacatioi,, those students
will certainly be breaking the spirit
of the regulations."
* * *
"Besides," he continued, "this will
create a bad morale among the stu-
dents. We may have great difficulty
in taming then down again to the true
present Michigan spirit."
* * *
"Keeping the students in Ann Arbor
during Christmas vacation is a great
constructive measure," declared Aris-
tide. "It will give the University a
wonderful opportunity to practice on
taking care of their spare time."
* * *
EFFECTIVE MEASURES ARE
TAKEN TO ENFORCE RULES
A fleet of two special Rolls officers
will begin at once to enforce the reg-
ulations set down by the Rolls board.
They will partol all railroad stations,
bus depots, interurban lines and auto
roads, and any students attempting to
leave Ann Arbor will be subjected to
severe discipline. The officers will
carry large revolvers, after the man-
ner set by the University cops.
* * r
Although only two officers have
been engaged, Rolls executives are
confidentthere will be little difficulty
in enforcing their designs upon the
10,000 Michigan students.
* * *
The heartiest cooperation has been
promised by various University offi-
cials. Since the auto regulations will
be relaxed during the vacation, the
Rolls board is petitioning that Assist-
ant-to-the-Dean Emery be placed at
their disposal.
* * *
WHY BRING THAT UP~
Ever since their meeting the Rolls
executives have been besieged by in-
dignant students, demanding to know
by what rights they had passed such
restrictive measures. "What's that
got to do with it?" snarled Black Teak
as he dismissed a student delegation.
* * *
"This measure is for the good of the
students, even if-they don't know it,"
he continued. "I hope no one will be
guilty of violating even the spirit of
our regulations."
* * *
TODAY'S WORST CONTRIBUTION
Only ten more classes to go.
Only ten more classes to go.
We slept awhile;

We snoozed awhile-
Only nine more classes to go.
Herbie.
* * *.
ALBION SPURNS MICHIGAN OFFER
The proud and mighty Athletic as-
sociation of the University of Michi-
gan, grown haughty after years of
turning down requests for football
games by every school from the great-
est down to the Fighting Irish, has at
last got a dose of its own medicine in
its search for games for Michigan's
brain-child team during the next sea-
son.
* * .*
Already Albion has indicated that
she probably yill not be on the list.
Ypsi and the Lapeer Reform school
have yet to be heard from.
* * *
"I wish the person who thought of
this scheme had to schedule thej
games," a member of the association
is said to have remarked.

..._.......
1

1THEATER.
BOOKS :
MUSIC
I
TONIGH': Play Production and Di-
rection presents "The Romantic Young
Lady" at 8:15 o'clock in the Mimes
theater.
TONI61IT: The Glee Club and the
Varsity Band will present a concert
at g o'clock in Hill auditoriuiU.
* * *

CAS S THEATRE
Second and Last Week
Presents a' New 3 c
Romance of Aiistocrat e
England andtin e Old West
"WHIE EAGLE"
w Prices: Nights, $1.00 to $3.50.
Matinees, $1.04) to $2.50, plus tax
Shubert
LAFAYETTE DETROIT
NOW SHOWING!
Twice Daily-2:15 and 8:15
UNCLE TO1S CABIN
Presented by Carl Laeumle
Prices-N ights, 50c, 75e, $1.00,
$1.50. 3latinees, 50c, 75c, $1.00.
All Seats Reserved
Woodward, at Eliot
BON SITELLE
PLAYHOUSE
Week Beginning Mon., Dec. 12
Sir Forbes-Robertson's Greatest
Success
IE 1)ASSING
of the
3RD FIOOR BACK

FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
We have recently installed new equipment and are now in a
better position to serve you in all your -
PRINTING NEEDS-
- -
k wn ..I-
}6our&Jbfr 6etter in press ions"
711IN. Univ. Ave. Phone 8805 Over Geo. Moe

CAMPUS OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request. Letters pub-
lished should not aye construed as ex-
pressinig the editorial opinion of The
Daily.
IN MEMORIAM
BYRON EDWARD BIGGS, II3. D.
To the Editor:
It is doubtful whether the Univer-
sity as a whole realizes what a loss
it has suffered in the death of Byron
Edward Biggs, Assistant Director of
the University Hospital. Not the least
of his many valuable attributes was!
his habit of letting his work speak forI
itself.
Hospital Directors who can manage
an institution of the University Hos-
pital and avoid the many pitfalls of
such an operation are rare people and
we may well be thankful that we have
one; but rarer still are Assistant Hos-
pital Directors who can ably second
the work of their Chiefs and hold
nearly the balance of their position:
Such positions require great knowl-
edge of hospital management, great
knowledge of the care of the sick, great
loyalty, great tact, great integrity.
These qualities Biggs had to an un-
usual degree. His quiet manner and
grave face hardly prepared a stranger
for his quick grasp of a complicated
problem and' kindly comprehensions
of a difficult situation. His judgments
were arrived at slowly, after careful
study and weighing of evidence. He
kept steadily before him, as does his
Chief, the welfare of the patient, the
dignity of his profession and the im-
portance of the service to the State.
His complete loyalty to his Chief, to
his University and to his calling were
an inspiration to his colleagues and an
example to his subordinates. Of gos-
sip he would have none. He sought
and dealt in the truth. He spreadj
about him an atmosphere of steadi-
ness, consideration and thoroughness
that gave assurance of good service.
That he had before him a future of
great usefulness can not be doubted,
but he left behind him a record of
work well done and an example which
his successors will be put to it to
equal.
--Ilmgh Cabot. -

"TIlE R 03ANT1C YOUNG LADY"
A review, by Vincent Wall
The Mimes theater was given over
last night to Play Production's "The
Romantic Young Lady"-a rather
wordy and flaccid comedy by Martinez
Sierra, a contemporary Iberian
dramatist last represented on campus
by Masque's "The Cradle Song," some
two season's ago. If a comparison of
these two plays might be drawn, it
would seem that Sierra had become
surfeited with a continued positive
affirmation of the good, the true, and
the beautiful in the latter, and turned
for relief to parlor comedy. As an
epigram shaker the author seems to be
less successful than with the tender
poetry of "The Cradle Song."
The portrait of Rosario Castellanos
is supposed to be, I believe, of a flap-
per of Madrid, faced with youth's
problem of self expression. She is
surrounded with the continental con-
vention and stifled in her attempt to
lead a normal sex life which is the
privilege of her American sister and
her native brother. As a result a
chance meeting with a popular novel-
ist gives Sierra an opportunity to
create an amorphous and gentle satire
of feminine conception of romance.
The cast expended a great deal of
finesse, nuance and the like on this
languid and badly translated comedy,
but as a whole acquitted themselves
very capably. although a few were a
trifle ham in several instances. Sam-
uel Bonnell in the exceedingly small
bit of Guilermo presented the most
effective acting of the evening. Rich-
ard Wollhaf, the only other familiar
name on the program, appeared brief-
ly in one scene and did very well con-
sidering the fact that he had nothing
to do. I understand that he helped
Earle Fleischman with the direction,
and whoever is responsible, deserves
credit for the job. Charles Green, one
of the newcomers might have done
wonders with the role of the novelist
if he lrad knownhis lines better. As
it is lie has possibilities. Marie Boss
was quite good as Dona Barbarita,
Helen Workman not so bad as Ro-
sario, and the rest may improve with
time.
THE PROGRAM
The Band and Glee Club will pre-
sent the following program in their
joint recital in Hill auditorium:
March, "The Wolverines".......
...............Carl E. Gehring
Overture, "Rienzi". .......R. Wagner
Cornet Solo, "Commodore Polka"
...............W. P. Chambers
Marshall L. Byrn, Grad.
"Ol' Grey Robe.........F. H. Huntley
Wake Miss Lindy".....H. W. Warner
Selections from Faust.... C. Gounod
Flute Solo, "Du Liegst Mir in
Hlerzen Boehm"
R. K. Becker
Overture, "Radient"....W. H. Kieffer
Christmas Greetings
President Little
a. "Silent Night''......German Carol
b. "The Cossack"........ MacDowell
c. "The Musical Trust........ Hadley
Overture, "Norma" ........V. Bellini
Baritone Solo, "Polka Euphonios"
..H. C. Miller
Frank Mercier, '28
"In A Persian Market".A. W. Ketelbey
"The Yellow and Blue".. C. M. Gayley
"A TAILOR IIADE MAN"
A review, by J. Stewart Hooker.
It has been said-and not without
justification-that Edwin M. Whitney
is the greatest dramatic recitalist on
the American stage today; but one
cannot help but wonder that when a
play is called a comedy yet contains
but eight genuine laughs (two for
each a ct) if there is not something
wrong with the play or with the im-
personator. In justice to Mr. Whit-
ney's performance on three past oc-

casions, one should judge it were the
p lay.
Where last year its was "The For-
tune Hunter" that at once delighted
and charmed, last night it was "The
Tailor Made Man," a play that has
previously undergone the test of stage
and screen, that spasmodically amused
but more often entertained-owing
for the most part to Mr. Whitney's
excellent portrayal of no less than 18
different characters around which a
none too original plot revolved.
To appreciate Mr. Whitney's per-
formance to the fullest degree, one
would do well perhaps to remember
the aphorism, "Shut yotmr eyes and
open your mouth! adding, and what

GARRICK
Second Week, Beginning
Sunday, D)ec. 11-
0 ights, 0c to $. . ed. Mat
Oc to $1.50. Sat. at., 4)to$2.
=An Actor's Theatre Production
Maxwell Anderson's Comedy
..1AU I SClllRN

r
ry
=1
i
l

®

=2

SCHVLTZ

GROCERY

Gilberts

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For Christmas

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Fresh Salted Nuts

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11

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Kodaks

Soaas

N-

I

A Merry Christmas
May You All Enjoy
and
A Happy New Year.

MICHIGAN FOLKS

BN C. R. berry

THESE AA-. /1 YES I &o70T MOST
GIB 5 m ELK S,
LET Ec C)R1G co.

WONT TOM
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'7

Glad Things--gifts for Christmas! This is Headquarters for Holiday Hints
array! For Pa and Ma and all the "-in-Laws." For the Little Ones. Su
presents to lring that happy, breathless response-"Just what I wanted!"

FOR
HER

word to the weary-
\y

Imported
and
Domestic
Toilet
Articles
Whitman's
Candy
New
Dunhill
Vanity
Cases

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ng Our
C hristmas
list here
oU CAN sHop with
us easily, quickly!
And you'll be delighted
with our Christmas
gifts. Exquisite, dainty
feminine things. Sensi-
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cheerful thought !-the
prices are modestly low.
Let us show you our
selection-including
Colgate's Dona Flor Gift
Box.

! Such an
ich sensible
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Cigars
Cigarettes
Au tona tic
Ligllters,.
Shavog
Sets
Safety
P azors
Travding
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FIELD HOUSE . FIDS

1y, my," exclaimed the welt-
--- j dated coed as she watched thej
With Governor Johnson holding off I1basketball game, "it must be the
the legislature with armed forcesI boys from the Opera."
Oklahoma is reasserting their place
which seemed to have been partially
usurped by the political squabbles in AS WE SEE IT(

Spain sent inspiration for
this lovely box of DonaFlor,
with its delicate, languor.
ous odor. A beautiful gift
for $4.50.

I

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