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December 10, 1927 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE STX

THE MTCHIGAN DAY Y

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10. 1927

............. - . ..... . .. ...... . . . . . . ........ . ... . ........

CAPPON

CHOSEN TO

S UC, E D

HA RRY KIPKE

HERE

S

ATHLETIC COMMITTEE
HAS NOT SANCT10ED
AP IPO1INTET AS YET
FORhMER COACH OF JAYIAWKS
ItETURNS T7o MIIIC10(AN
AFTER TWO YEARS
ASSISTED YOST IN 1925
Disagreement With Athletic Board
CausIed Resignation As Grid
Mentor At Kansas
Franklin C. Cappon, former Michi-
gan football and basketball star and
grid coach at Kansas University for
the past two years, has been appointed
assistant Wolverine coach to succeed
Harry Kipke, who resigned recently
to accept the post of head football
coach at Michigan State.
The return of "Cappy" after two
y'ears absence awaits only the sanc-
tion of the executive committee of the
Board in Control of Athletics before
it can become official, however.
Yost Conduets Negotiations.
Immediately after the footbrall sea-
son ended this fall, Cappon tendered
his resignation as head coach to the
Kansas athletic authorities with his
contract still having a year to run.
It was understood at the time that
there was a rather definite disagree-
ment between Cappon and the Jay-
hawker athletic director, F. C. Allen,
over coaching. Cappon was supported
in his views, the others on the foot-
bal coaching staff resigning along
with him.
Negotiations between Director Field-
ing H. Yost and Cappy were begun
soon after the "Kansas break" and
arrangements were practically com-
pleted at Chicago last Saturday.
lPlayed On Teams Here.
Cappon's last year at Michigan was
in 1925 when the Wolverines had what
Yost called the "greatest team he had
ever seen in action." This team was
noted for its great blocking, credit
for which was divided between- Cap-
pon and Wieman..
Because of his participation on
Michigan teams for three years and a
year's service as assistant, Cappon is
thoroughly acquainted with the Michi-
gan system of football coaching.
While in school, Cappon was recog-
nized as one of the most versatile per-
formers that ever played at Michigan.
After playing at end in his sopho-
more year, he was shifted to a tackle
position in his junior year, playing
brilliantly in both positions. In his
last year he was placed at the full-
back post, and his consistently fine
playing throughout the season earned
him a position on both the all-Confer-
ence, and all-Western mythical
elevens.
Following his graduation in 1923,
he accepted the head football coach
post at Luther college, Luther, Iowa,
where he remained for two Peasons,
returning to Michigan again in 1925
as line coach.
Cappon also starred as a basketball
player during his scholastic days here,
and is expected to aid Coach Edwin J.
WIather with Michigan's court teams.
WASHINGTON-Clyde Milan has
been signed as coach by the Wash-
ington Senators for next year.

_ . _ .._. __
- -

_

{!{
I

Veterans Composea
Big Ten Wrestling
Teams This Season
Pre-season information seems to in-
dipate that this year's Conference
wrestling schedule will result in a
closely contested battle for first hon-
ors in both divisions, as at least four
of the teams in the eastern as well as
the western groups will start the Big
Ten season with veteran aggregations.
In the eastern division, which in-
cludes Michigan, Ohio State, Purdue
Indiana, and Northwestern, the Wol-
verines, who captured first place in
the sectional race last year, the Buck-
eyes, the Wildcats, and the Hoosiers
all, loom as possible contenders for
first honors.
Buckeyes IHve Strong Team
Ohio State is reputed to have even
a stronger outfit than in 1925, when
the Scarlet and Grey matmen finished
the season in a tie for first place.
According to Coach Keen, the Duch
eyes will be the most formidable op-
ponent on the Wolverine slate.
Indiana will start the season under
a new mentor. Coach Toms, who will
direct the veteran hoosier matmen
formerly starred on the Iowa team.
He was also wrestling coach at Wa-
bash college before his appointment
to the Indiana coaching staff.
Reinforced by the addition of two
promising sophomores, Lupton and
Kent, Northwestern tflreatens to make
a strong bid for first honors. Lupton
who holds the national 115-pound
title, Kent a capable 175-pounder from
Oklahoma, and Captain Schuler, one
of the best heavyweights in Confer-
ence circles, form the nucleus of the
1927-28 Purple squad.
Litle Known About Purdte
Purdue is the single doubtful entry
in the race for honors in the eastern
division. The Boilermakers have sev-
eral veteran performers back this sea-
son, including Johnson, heavyweight
star, but comparatively little is known
concerning the new material.
The western group, composed of
Illinois, Iowa, Chicago, Minnesotaand
Wisconsin, looms as the scene of an
equally intereshg race for first hon-
ors, with Illinois, Iowa, and Wisgon-
sin ranking as the strongest title
aspirants.
Illionis, last year's Big Ten cham-
pion, is slightly favored over the other
two leaders, because of its strong re-
serve squad from last season. Al-
though the Illini lost several veterans
through graduation, the freshman ma-
terial and the reserves will more than
offset the losses.
The Hawkeyes will be close on the
heels of the Indians, however, as they
boast a veteranhperformer in nearly
every one of the seven weight di-
visions. Last season Iowa finished a
close second to the Illini for first place
in the western division, losing by a
single match.
Wisconsin promises to finish much
higher in the Big Ten standings this
year than it did last. No less than six
lettermen are numbered among the
Cardinal mat candidates. including
Smith, Big Ten 115-pound champion.
Although Minnesota lost a valuable
performer in Capt. Steve Easter, 135-
pound star, the Gophers are reputed
to have a more formidable team this
season than last, when they finished
in third position in their division of
the Big Ten. Chicago, like Purdue,
looms' as a "dark horse," and the
Maroons' final standing in the Con-
ference will depend largely on their
new material.
According to the present arrange-
ment, each Conference team meets
every other team in- the same division,
and when the regular schedule is com-
pleted the teams will meet those hol.'-
ing a similar position in the standings
of the other group to determine the
final Conference- standings. This sea-
son the eastern teams will entertai'-

their western rivals in these champi-
onship meets.
ST. LOUIS-Frnest Orsatti, out-
fielder, has been released to Minne-
apolis by the Cardinals.

OOSTERBAAN IS UNANIMOUS L - CAN CHOICERS Intramural Office
C R PSASO WT ITAppoints Trainers
x{ k: To Help AthletesT

Due to an increase in the numberE- Tr
of men :'. ~~~igh t$ i igTeni Basketball 'Teams n Wilt
tf men participating in intramural M eet Initial OlPonents In
activities, it was found necessary to ("age Season lmuiugurail
appoint two- trainers instead of the
one who has acted in that capacity PURPLE TO MEET WABASH
until the present time. In palce of
Ted Sullivan, former intramural train-
er, two medical students have been squads will pry open the lid of the
appointed to render first aid and any 1927-28 cage campaign tonight, only
other assistance which is Iowa and Purdue failing to swing into

necessary in their capacities as train-
ers.
Paul Williams and Ted Williamson1
have been appointed as the new train-
ers. One or both men will be at
Waterman gym during all games and;
meets held there, and will be prepared
to render all assistance relative to
their positions as trainers.
Practice for all teams registered at
the intramural office for the various
campus championship matches, will
take place next week on Monday,{
Tuesday, and Wednesday. There will
be no practice session on Thursday
night due to the fact that a Varsity
game is scheduled at the field house.
The intramural office has issued a

Iowa has already played in the sea-
son's inaugural, defeating Knox col-
lege of Illinois, 30-21, while Purdue,
tied with the Hawks and Indiana for
second place last yeah, is still prepar-
ing for the initial tilt with State
Normal on Tuesday.
.-New Couches Make Debut
Wabash will invade Northwestern;
Monmouth, Chicago; Knox, Illinois;
Franklin, Indiana; Coe, Wisconsin;
Cornell (Iowa), Minnesota; Ohio Wes-
leyan, Ohio; and, of course, Michigan
State will oppose Michigan.
Three new pilots will also render
their respective premieres. Coaches
Lonborg, Olsen, and MacMillan, of
Northwestern, Ohio, and Minnesota, in
the order named.

4

f

C

statement that all members of basket- Coach Lonborg, of the Wildcat quin-
ball teams must report for practice or tet, faces the task of placing a team
take a physical examination before on the floor that will raise itself from
they will be allowed to compete in the the cellar berth to which it was
tournament games. (Continued on Page Seven)

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_ _ _
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1 _
/YoTPED4M rIS -WCK YA/.Er .EN AW WR~
Benny Oosterbaan, Michigan's star end, was the1naninlous hoic of t e sports wi-itrs who selected the Cen-
tral Press assication all-American team, and was honored by l) m selecied captain of the mythical eleven. Herb
Joesting of Minnesota was the only oth-r Big Ten player chosen, ing placed at fullback.
Two other Wolverine* grid stars were honored when Ray ,1 e ; ad Luis Cilbert were picked for the second team
at guard and halfback respectively. Hanson of Minnesota, ansIther Conference player, was given the other guard

berth on the second eleven.
Yale, Notre Dame, and Southern
California men predominated the Cen-
tral Press all-American. Charles-
worth, Webster, and Fishwick were
the sons of Old Eli selected. Flana-
gan and Smith were the Irish choices,
while Hibbs and Drury represented
the Trojan;.
The Central Press second team was
composed of Shiver of Georgia and 1
Philips of California, ends; Hake of
Penn., and Pickard of Alabama,
tackles; Hanson and Baer, guards;
Bettincourt of St.. Mary's, center; and
Spears of Vanderbilt, Gilbert, Caldwell
of Yale, and Briante of New York U in
the backfield.
QUEBEC-Quebec's annual dog der-
by will be held on Feb. 20.

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Edgeworth
is what the
well-dressed
pipe
w-ill wear

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VARSITY COURT ROSTER.

Harrigan (Capt.) ....18
Oosterbaan.........17
Slagle..............16
Cushing ............15
Chapman ...........14
Raber ..............12
Gawne.............11
Schroeder..........10
Nyland .............9
Lovell .............. 8
McCoy .............. 7
Bowerman ...........6'
Balsamo ............ 5
Rose...............4
Kanitz..............3
Daniels.............19
Whittle .............21
McDonald ..........22

Gor F
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'I

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Whitehouse &, Hardy Models
On Display At
GUY WOOLFOLK
336 South State Street
ixclusive Lasts and Patterns Designed and Sold Only by
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.r UP-MOP. ® w-
Hand kechefs.
as a
GIFT
are most acceptable
in-
Imported Fancy and Plain Linens
--
I-
We are showing the largest assortment of any house in
Michigan-
Priced very reasonab- .
3:-
1Oc to $2.50 each
$1.00 the doz. to $24.00 the doz.
TinkerV4"Company
jam. n N )r. . T4X"\" . ..

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4

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- WINTER IS HERE TO STAY
Here is your Overcoat
at Great Savings
-I-
S$40 Coats $30.00 ~
45 Coats 33.75
50 Coats 37.50~
other Coats 27.50_
$45, $50, $55 and $60 2-pants suits -
$38.50

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A-

for Christmas Seals today

;I

HAS your local tubercu-
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some Christmas Seals to you?
Why should you keep them?

'Em
FF-- cr r-.f;
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more than half. Every seal
you buy works directly for the
health of your community,
your friends, your family-

i

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