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December 08, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-08

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THTURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1927

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY '

PAGE THR2EE

RUS 'STURGIS WI MAY BE CHOSEN
CYRS TUGI WLLNEW AMBASSADORLETRRODICS
SPEAK TO SAN IEO 'BIBLE IN TALK TODAY
D T NX MH Alexander Souter Js One Of Greatest
1M UScriptural Scholars In England,

TAKES TRIP UNDER AUSPICES
OF SCRIPPS CLINIC
LECTURE
WILL TALKIN DETROIT
University Inistitute Direcetor Given
Honor; Will Be Third Speaker
Chosen By Group
Dr. Cyrus Sturgis, director of the
Simpson Memorial institute. will leave
early in January for San Diego, Cal.,
where he will speak before "a group of
physicians under the auspices of the
third annual Scripp's Clinic lecture
of the San Diego County Medical so-
ciety.
Men who have had the honor of
being invited to lecture before are:
Dr. Elliott P. Joslin of Boston, pro-
fessor of medicine at the Harvard
Medical school; and Dr. William Mc-
Kim Marriott, dean and professor of
pediatrics, Washington university, St.
Louis, Missouri.
Has Several Engagements
Dr. Sturgis has several engagements
to speak before representative physi-
'cians here prior to his departure for
California. This coming Friday evening
he will speak on the regular Michigan
Night radio program to be broadcast
from station WWJ. On Dec. 13 he
will speak before the Wayne County
Medical society at Detroit concerning
the recent developments of pernicious
anemia, and on Dec. 16, Doctor Sturgis
will speak before the Toledo Academy
of Medicine on "Pernicious Anemia."
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA.-
Students at this university, by pur-
chasing student activity tickets, may
attend 53 events, including all ath-
letic contests, musical programs, plays-
and lectures for only $;T,

Says Professor Sanders
COMES FROM ABERDEEN
Dr. Alexander Souter, well-known
Bible scholar, will deliver a lecture on
"The Latin Bible' at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in the Natural Science
auditorium.
Dr. Souter, according to Prof. Hen-
ry A. Sanders, of the Latin depart-
ment, is one of the two or three, out-
standing Bible scholars in England at
the present time. Since 1911 Profes-
sor Souter has been Regius professor
of Humanity at the University of
Aberdeen. Previous to holding this
position, he held the position of pro-
fessor of New Testament Greek and
Exegesis in Mansfield college of Ox-
ford university.
Doctor Souter has come over to
this country to deliver a special ser-
ies of lectures on the Bible at the
Princeton theological seminary. While
in the United S'tates he is also giving
about a dozen lectures in the other
notable universities. He is only able
to spend one month in this country
and according to Professor Sanders,
he will be in Ann Arbor for three
days., While here Doctor Souter will
be the guest of Professor Sanders.
There are 116 towns in New Hamp-
shire. without a resident physician..

Forests Are Important For Regulation
Of Streamflow, Says Zon To Foresters
That the forest plays an important of the forests upon air and soil
part in the regulation of streamflow : temperature, relative humidity, effec-
has been brought out by scientific in- tive precipitation, evaporation, wind,
vestigation over many years and in and runoff of the water, all of which
many parts of the world, according to control streamflow. A comparison of
Raphael Zon, director of the Lake many streams having forested and
States Exepriment station of the nonforested watersheds support the
Forest service, United States depart- conclusions reached by Zon.
ment of agriculture.
The forests are not only an import- Forest covers is most beneficial on
ant factor in regulating streamfiow, steep slopes, at the higher elevations
but also aid in modifying climate and and on nonporous soils. The forests
ut asorai odfyth oilimtend i to- break the force of storms, absorb
thecharacter nt of the ato- some of the grater, and permit more
ward the improvement of the water water to seep down into the soil
storage of any water shed. These 1 where it is gradually released to feed
conclusions of Director Zon's regard- springs and larger streams. The
floods are of particular interest now maintenance of forest cover has been
floos ae o paricuar nterst ow hown to be the cheapest a 11(1!lc 5
when ways and means of preventingsont eteceps n e!
whenwaysand eansof peveni way of preventing erosion by its ten-
flood waters are being given such wide dnc to bind the soiin place
consideration. In his booklet entitled yte soil in place.
"Forests and Water in the Light of
Scientific Investigation," just publish- A million dollars, a gift from Rock-
ed by the United States department of efeller, will constitute the fund fo
agriculture, Zon points out that al- the development of a new medicl'
though floods which are produced by center at the American university at
exceptional rainfall cannot be pre- Beirut, Syria.
vented by forests, yet, without the
mitigrating influence of the forests,
floods are more severe and destruc- TER
tive.
National policies, he says, although
considering the direct value of forests
as a source of timber, fail to take$
full account of their influence upon
erosion and the flow of streams and r She was one of
climate. 'hundred-lie w as
The tendency of the forest is to the Four Th
equalize the flow throughout the year Truck Drivers.
of all streams having their origins in took her on a xN
treecovered mountain regions. This that made her
is explained by the combined effects there was anyb )o

TDescribing the cen! rol theme of
Jacob Wasrman's novels a the
"!''lessiah Mot'if," ail utte' subjet ion
of self for the good o C uanty,
Freled D. Wahr, assistant dean o. stu-
(ents, presepjted a sympathetic int -
pretation of the famous German nov-
elist Tuesday night before the Ilillel
foundation.
That the problems which arise ont
ci a lack of si:h-iua diet o
the great mlnteri l a ad nd ri ,
xv orl (of ost w. Lune. have ben
m'st a dieately 'u the im-
pr'essionist ic school of Cermon t'o -
elists domi-ted ine main by Jews
anl especially by a-asserman, i -
counted for by Deani 1\hr in the
dreamy and courageous ilensity with
which the Jewish. race through the
ages has faced the problems of mal-
adjustment to the material world..

A ibition Of Books
Have First Editions
A SSRM NO Featured In Display

Fidst editions of modern authors
are on display in the main library ex,
hihit, and include the works of
Preiser, Morley, Galsworthy, and
iany of the more famous present day
witers,
According to the Congressional li-
brary classification, a modern author
is one born after 1869 whose best
works have been written and flourish-
ed after 1900. Besides the writers al-
ready mentioned Amy Lowell's copy
of "Tst Wind," "Suspense" by Joseph
Conrad, "Tragedy of Nan" by Mase-
field, and "Jurgen" by Cabell are all
shown in first editions.
These editions are bought up so
aliblly by the public that after the
'st reprint the prices increase to
many times their original value. Many
Icollectors of first editions purchase
ihe new copies. Many amateur col,
lectors are greatly interested in mod-
ern first editions and have quite ex-
tensive libraries buying the publish-
er's first printing.

i

Colonel Noble Brandon Judah
Chicago millionaire, being consider-
ed according to reports, as the new
United States ambassador to Cuba.
He would succeed Gen. Enoch Crow-
der, whose resignation became effec-
tive Sept. 1.
LUMBERMEN WILL
HOLD CONFERENCE
Timber land owners and lumber
manufacturers of the state will meet
in Ann Arbor tomorrow for a con- .
vention. The meeting has been calledI
by President Clarence Cook Little and
will include members of two com-
mittees appointed by him last spring
on the inauguration of the new School
of Forestry and Conservation.
When the foresters assembled here
last spring two committees were ap-
pointed to aid in the establishment of
the forestry school here. This will
be the first time that the committees
have assembled since then.

: Ii

the IvlVe1Cworld

STARTING TODAY
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til 1"o r 1)dEi a girl powder and paint
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at or y01he "Man Crazy."
y else in
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you know?
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MEN'S SILK SOX, FANCY
25c Pair
MEN'S BROADCLOTH SHIRTS-98c
MEN'S PURE LINEN
HANDKERCHIEFS-15c
Ann Arbor Dry Goods Co.
316 SOUTH MAIN STREET
Between Liberty and Williams

DOROTHY MACKAILL and JACK MULHALL
From the Saturday Evening Post slory "CLARISSA AND THE POST ROAD,"
by Grace Saa- .well I itson-

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