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December 06, 1927 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-12-06

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ESTABLISHED
1890

AV Ar
Ida, A*-
dgdmfte
'Roo6w
Itil r

all

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII, No. 66. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1927

EIGHT1 PAGES

UNIVERSITY LAYS PL ANS FO TWO

FOOTBALL

TEAMS

BEGIN SESIONT
gas lAftal0 EMMiL1 P 3~ VII
RAI"'
AN TI (1 [AT'~El EIlI;CT ION
LONGWORTLI RE-ELECTED
PreOdent Coolidge To Deth er A ialI
Message ho oiinihiiiIed Session
Of Rouses _ T orrow
(By Associaed lPre-;)
WASHINGTON, Dec. 5 - The 70111
Congress began work on Capita l JIM
today with a political tumult in the
Senate that promises to echo through-
out the session and far into next sund-
mer's presidential campaig.
Hardly had the bangs of the gaveis
called both houses to order befoen'
the long-impending Smith-Vare elec-
tion battle broke in the Senate and
shoved into the background the con-
sideration of a host of legislative
tasks that the new Congress will be'
called upon to tackle.
Even in the House, where/ stricter
rules call for more regular procedure,
came an indication of discord and po-
litical confusion ahead. After some
debate a resolution was adopted t
investigate the eligibility of one of 11s
new members, James M. Beck, of
Pennsylvania, a Republican, elected lo
fill William S. Vare's seat, and chi(t
fn, arnin i Sne orm

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MICHIGN GLEECLUB U PNDMITE NNA UNION OPERA MEMBERS OF IG TEN ADOPT N E W SYSTEMGLE
HILL F[xTRE eiXTt y =h s'HAS LOCAL PREMI[RE' INVOLVING TW0 COMPLETE SQUADS EACH OF
Dsccpline committee for the remain-
UNIVERSITY PROlRAM iaAT WHITNEY THEATER WHICH WILL PLAY EIGHT GAMES NEXT YEAR
U E Ttomo ereguiations of the University.
MLUi thL .x- dZ, ' u i i baJIII'J il he- b +-

.Iicholas Longworth
Of Ohio, who was re-elected speak-
er of the house as the 70th Congress
^onvened in Washington yesterday.
CLASS~-LECTIONS TO
BECNLDE OA

counsel tor Vare in is ena e cony
test.
Message Is Today
Despite the first minute eligibility
disputes, Congress got its machinery
into shape to receive President Cool-
idge's annual message at noon to-
morrow. After that has been read by
the clerks of the two houses, t~l
House will make a start at its huge
legislative tasks. The Senate will bn
plunged into the S'mith-Vare ,*ht,
which may occupy its attention for
days and perhaps weeks.
After establishing that 417 of its
435 members were present, the House
reelected Nicholas Longworth, r'
Ohio, as speaker; William Tyler Page
as its clerk, and all of the other offi--
cers nominated by the Repuiblican ma-
jority, thus reaffirming that party's,
control in that body.
Reorganization of the Senate was
deferred until later in the week by an
agreement between the Rl(publicma
and Democratic leaders, but c hap
lain was elected, the Rev. C. Z. Phil-
lips, rector of Epiphany Episcopal
c:hurch here, lcing selected to suc-
ceed the late Rev. J. J. Muir.
Former Solicitor-General Beck wos
given the oath after the motion
prevent him from doing so had le)en
rejected by a vote of 213 to 157. Sub-
sequently, without a roll-call, I
House referred to an elect ims e -.
mittee the question of whether he was
a legal resident of Pennsylvania at
the time he was elected to the I loue
in a special election last month.
After a first session listing on v a
little more than two and half lor-.
the Iouse adjournedA with theG ap-
pointment of the Rerublican a iid
Democratic leaders, Chilson of Con-
necticut, and Garrett, of T1nimsse --
as a committee to act with a siniirir
one from the Senate. Curtis, of Kau-
sas, majority leader, and Robinson, ol
Arkansas, the minority leader, in
notifying President Coolidge that the
New Congress was ready to repcei;°c
his message.
This form of notification was gi'y'r
in mid-afternoon and the expectation
is that Mr. Coolidge will send his an-
iual message to Capital hill by ni
senger so that its reading may begin
immediately upon the convening o
the two houses tomorrow..
Roll tCaiGi en
Then came the roll call of the sen
atirs-elect. A hush descended both
upon the members of the Senate and

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Freshmen Of Arehitectural, Pharmaicy
Colleges Will Elect Officers
TI'bis Afternoon
ARE LAST OF THIS YEAR
Freshmen of the architectural cc'
lege and of the College of Pharmach
will hold their class elections this
afternoon, according to arrangements
completed by the Student council
elections committee yesterday. The
freshmen of the architectural college
will meet at 4 o'clock this afternoon
in room 348 of the Nest Engineering
building, while the freshmen of the
CLASS ELECTIONS TODAY j
Freshmenj
Architectural College ......4:00
Room 348 West Engineering
Building
College of liarmacy......5:00f
Room 303 Chemistry Building
College of Pharmnacy will iet an
hour later, at 5 o'clock, in room 301
of the Chenmis;try 1ililnr;.
These freshmen elect ion s are the
last class elections of the year to h
scheduled by the Student council
Selections conimmittee, under the chair-
mianship of Ellis Merry, '28, and will
be staged as the elections in the other
classes thus far have Been, with dif-
ferent colored ballots for each clas
: iid oi(Jers from the Student council
officiating.
iFollowing the fre:himen class elec-
tions tdaiy the freshmen of the en-
g',jwering college and of the College
of Lite oature, Science, and the Arts
S ill hbol their elections tomorrow,
The elect ion of the freshmen of ti
SCoi e-,e of Literature, Science, and the
Arts will ble the largest of the serie
of cl,i- eleclions, it is expected, an
t as a result the balloting will be hel
hin Hill auditorium.
The freshumen of the enginoerinp
l ic will meet at 11 o'clock to-
norrow morning in room 348 of the
WeAt Engineering building for th
c nice of their officers, while th4
reshneln of the literary college wil'
n(eet al 4 o'clock tomorrow afternooi
n lill auditorium. The elections o
he freslmen of the engineering cols
loge will be held at a regular clas.
assembly previously scheduled.
A 1 ny student, to be a candidate fo
1 office or to vote in any of these elec
d tions, must be a regularly enrollee

ORWANIZATJO N ILl~ PRESE NT A
(IRO OF COLLE' E A N0)
PORULAR N UMBERS
W. ABBOT WILL OFFICIATE
llr. Cross, Dr. Sturgis, Pro. O'Neill
Will Seak O The las ltadi
Broadcast Of Tear
Featured upon the sixthi Michligan
Night radio program to be broadclast
Iriday night between 7 and S o'clock
over station WWJ, the Detroit News.
will be the In versity of i'higan
Glee club. under the direction ci
Theodore Harrison, of the University
School of Music, according to ar-
rangements completed for this week's
broadcast.
The Glee club is said to be compos-
ed of the best singers in the Univer-
sity and, according to Waldo M. Ab-
bot, of the rhetoric department, pres-
ent program manager and announcer,
who also managed the 1926-27 series,
their programs in the past have met
with the enthusiastic approval of the
radio audiences. The Glee club, which
numbers about 50 young men, will
sing a program of college songs and
some popular numbers.
Will rakse Picture
At. the conclusion of the program
Friday night, Mr. Abbot announced
yesterday afternoon, a picture of the
campus broadcasting studio on the
fourth floor of University hall will be
taken, showing the Glee club as well
as one of the speakers before the
microphone, just as would be the
case during the regular broadcasting
hour.
This week's program will be
rounded out with addresses by three
University speakers. The first of these
will be one by Prof. Arthur Lyons
Cross, of the history department, wh
will take as the subject of his talk
"Truthful History." Dr. Cross l the
author of a "Short History of Eng-
land" in addition to a number of
other history books.
Dr. Cyrus R. Sturgis, director of
the Thomas Henry ~impon Memor
ial Institute for Medical Research,
in which research is being conducted
concerning the cause and cure of per-
nicious anemia, will be the second1
speaker on the program, confining his
address to a discussion of this disease
and its treatment. Recent figures have(
shown that the state of Michigan i
afflicted with pernicious aemia suf-
ferers more than any other one sta
in the country. 1Heretofore consider,
fatal, the use of liver diet as a crn?
for this ailment has prove to le a
cure' in some cases.
O'Neill Oni Prormtai
Prof. James L. O'Neill, new b d ll
Of the speech (department, who joined
the University faculty this year aftte
comning from) tile Universit y .of Wis-
coinsin, will be the third and con-
luding speaker on this Friday>
broadcast ."The Function of Speech'
iwii be the subject of Professo O
Neill's address.
This week's radio broadcast will ic
the last of the present year, the ser-
ies to be resumed early in January
after the Christmas holiday recess
according to Mr. Abbot. Over one-haf
of the period allotted to the Mihiga
Night program, Mr. Abbot says, wil
be given over this week to the vari
ous numbers by the Glee club.
LINDBERGH PLANE
AVERTS DISASTE
(By Associated Press)
HASBROUCK HEIGHTS, N. J., Dec
5-Col. Charles A. Lindbergh narrow
ly escaped injury today when one o
the wheels of his "Spirit of St. Louis'
struck a hole and tilted the plan
sufficiently to damage the propeller a
the Teeterboro airport, according t
information from the Gaes Flyin
Circus company.

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T C EIJY TO BE GIY[N foA review of last night'sper-
f ance of T he Same 'oY ,
22nd Annual Union Opera, will
be oun inthe Tlheater, Books,
and Music column on page 4.s
:'The Romantic Young Lady" ,1By presentation last night culminated
Sierra Will Have Three Per seven months' work on the part of
formiances Early Next Week the members of the cast, choruses,
and committees, during which time
F1EICHIMAN WILL DIRECT "The Same To You" has been evolved
from the book and routine stage into
its present form under the direction
tickets will he placed on sale on
Thursday at the box office in Mime T of E. Mortimer Shuter.
theater for thio three performances of The books and lyrics for the show
The Romantic oting Lady" by Mar- were written by Vincent C. Wall, Jr.,
te Sirra.Tis wil dy"teMlast - '28, and Thomas J. Dougall, '28, and
tiez Sierra. This will be the of all of the music was written by Wil--
the legitimate productions for the in- liam M. Lewis, Jr., '29. The book was
terval before the Christmas holidays, selected in the customary competition
and will he given Tuesday, Wednes- e.held last spring, and since that time
lay anl Thursday of next eek. rhe has undergone thorough rewriting.
pl~ay wvii be given iby Play Produc- The settings for the production were
tion, and will be directed by Earle constructed in the Mimes theater un-
Fleisehman, of the speech depart- der the supervision of Otto Schiller
ment. and the Mimes scenic staff.. The cos-
"'The Romantic Young Lady" is a tumes were created specially by Les-
light comedy, translated from the ter of Chicago, who has costumed
original Spanish of Sierra by Harley most of the Operas of the past.u
Granville-Barker and his wife. It is Authors Have Roles
one of the few examples extant of th' Lewis, Wall, and Dougall were all
work of mnodernsSpanishpdramatists. members of the cast of "Front Page
he comedy was first presepted in Stuff" last year, and all have roles in
1918 in Madrid, and later in 1920 in the 1927 Opera in addition to their
London. It's New York premiere was work in producing it. Prominent in
given in 1925. It is in three acts and the cast of "The Same To You" are
two scenes. C. Lyman Crane, '29, Watson D. Har-
Set.s for the production are being baugh, '28, George Randall, '29, Rob-
built by the classes in stagecraft as ert Wetzel, '28, Charles D. Living-
a part of their academic work, and stons, '28L, Richard C. Kurvink, '29,
under the direction of Richard Woel- and Paul Samson, '31M. Robert Gra-
haf, scenic director and graduate as- ham, '28, sings the principal songs of
sistant in the department. The lead- the show, "Indigo Strain," and "Rus-
ing role, of Felipe de Cordoba, the ap- sian Rose."
piarition, will be filled by Charles Lester has been in Ann Arbor for
Green, a graduate assistant, who the last few days preceding last
came to the University from Wiscon- night's performance giving his atten-
sin with Prof. James M. O'Neill. Green tions to the costumes which he de-
is a graduate of Oklahoma uni- ~ signed earlier in the year. These were
:ersity. late in arrival, and this fact necessi-
Others in the cast of "The Roman tated considerable last minute fitting
tic Young Lady" are Helen Workman, and altering.
'30, Mlarie Boss, '29Ed, and Samuel The orchestra that is playing in the
IO~cinell, '28. pit at the Whitney has been recruited
Tickets for the production will als from the Mimes theater group and
be obtainable in the lower corrido from Sid Byrant's dance orchestra at
of University hall. They are reserved the Union. Both of these have been
and are priced at 75 cents. "The Ito- augmented as to numbers,,and are
nantic Young Lady" was scheduled ! (under the direction of Kemp Keena of
to he presented earlier in the year, Detroit. This orchestra is larger than
imt had to be cancelled because of any that has accompanied the Opera
coimlica tions in dates with the plays on tour before-.
of the Aimes Players and Comedy Settings for "The Same To You,"
club. including the two acts and four
-----~--~---scenes, were built entirely by the
GILBERT IS LOST Mimes organization and on a large
TO OPERA CAST scale because of the greater size of
some of the theaters where the Opera
will play. The first act set is laid in
Louis Gilbert, '28, football star, who a garden of a palatial Long Island
has been cast in the role of a butler 1 home, while the three in the secomI
in the 22nd Union opera "The Same act are centered about the Indigo Isle
To You," which opened last night at Night club, a notorious underworld
the Whitney theater, has been decler- rendezvous.
ad ineligible by Dean John Effinger Cocerns Stolen Bonds
of the College of Literature, Science, The plot of "The Same To You"
and the Arts, according to an an- deals with stolen bonds and an indis-
nouneement made yesterday by offi- creet financier. The latter is involved
cials of the Union. in a plot woven by a blues singer, the
Charles Iivingstone, '28L, who has cafe proprietor, and a "hoofer," but
had the leading part in every Mimes is extricated with the aid of his office
play for two years and who will make bo and two daughters The whole
his debut with Jessie nseur on the production has been worked up in
professional stage in February, has (modern musical comedy style.
been cast in GilberUs part. He played Performances of "The Same To

PLEDGE CO-OPERATION
FOR FRESHMAN V(EEK
I nf terfraternity Council Resolves To
lrrment Inter erenice 1'ith
Eirsl ieeIk Activities

competing on either of the intercolleg-
iate teams next fall will have to be
scholastically eligible and in the upper
three classes of the University under
r the Western Conference rules.
There may be some change in the
reserve squad, according to Professor
Yost, since it is possible that this
second team will cut into their num-
bers so greatly as to force some alter-
ations. Things will be worked out,
however, Professor Yost said, as seems

iem n was cr vi ng an autoimoli e -
longing to Hugh Kitchen, '29E, and IPRESENTATION OF "THE SAME PRESIDENT LITTLE WAS ORIGINATOR OF INNOVATION
was returning from Detroit when the TO YOU" CULMINATES_ _

n ovy, 7+ most convenient when the teamrs begin
S UHR i;ar JGHV1S' Ktt'I I working next fall and when the coach-
I ing staff sees more clearly how they

Cooperation f the fraternities and
the University during the activities of
Freshman week was assured by a
resolution passed at the meeting of
the Interfraternity council yesterday
afternoon.
The resolution, drawn up by a
special committee appointed for this
purpose, and presented by Ellis Mer- I
ry, '28, read as follows:
"Whereas, the Interfraternity coun-
cil recognizes the University Fresh-
man week as an activity deserving
their cooperation.
"Be it resolved, that the members
of the council so regulate their rush-
ing activities as not to interfere with
the University Freshman week; that
the fraternities observe the time
schedules which may be announced
by the University officials; that viola-
tions of the rule brought to the at-
tention of the council by the Univer-
sity authorities shall be dealt with
by the Judiciary committee; that the
fraternities be advised to cooperate
with Freshman week by encouraging,
and personally conducting the fresh-
men to attend the scheduled meet-
ings.
"The committee also wishes to point
out the possible punishments which
may be used by the Judiciary com-
mittee, as social probation, delay of
initiation and delay of pledging."
In briefly stating the conside.tions
which had influenced the committee
in its decision, Merry stated that the
th-*oretical advantages of deferred
rushing were more than offset by the
practical difficulties confronting N.
The committee decided against de-
ferred rushing, preferring a plan .o
cooperation, since it felt that in a
school as large as Michigan, the en-
forcement of delayed rushing would
be impossible, inasmuch as detection
o infractions could not be success-
ful.
Wayne Schroeder, '28, gave a re,
sumo of the meetings of the under-
graduate section of the national Inter-
fraternity conference, held in New
York on Nov. 25 and 26, which he
and Edward Wachs, '29. attended as
representatives of Michigan. Sevej
problems affecting fraternit ,s we W
discussed: fraternity scholarship, the
iincorporation of fraternity councils,
collective buying, control and en-
forcement of council rulings, fune-
tions of local interfraternity councils,
whether or not freshmen should live
in fraternity houses and deferred
rushing.
A committee, consisting of Orville
L. Dowzer, '29, chairman, Rueben 1).
Wax, '29, and William C. Campbell,
'28, was appointed to consider wa
and means of encouraging larger re-
presentations for the meetings of the
council. The most probable solution
suggested was that each fraternity
missing two or more meetings be
fined. This committee will report at
the next meeting to be held Jan.
9.
WAHR WILL SPEAK
TO HILLEL GROUP
Fred B. Wahr, assistant dean of stu-
dents, will speak at the headquarters
_P +4.- Lrr,111 r.nr~n *,.. + -.L4. .,.

can be worked out.
There will be no change in tile
coaching staff, Professor Yost stated,
except the possible addition of one
more man.
Begin Plans For Schedule.
The of ice of the Athletic association
has made advances to a number of
smaller colleges in Ohio and Michigan
for games next fall, and squad P. will
undoubtedly play most of its gaines
next year with these teams. Since the
arrangements made involve plans to
have one team play at home and one
away each Saturday durimg the fall
session, and since the plans have
already been made to have one team
play six games here and two away, tho
other team will of necessity play six
games out of town and one in the new
stadium, according to arrangements.
It is planned that in future years,
when the two teams have been devel-
oped to nearly equal strength, the Con-
ference universities will play two
games on the same day with each oth-
er, thus when one Michigan team plays
Ohio here the other will play another
Ohio team at Columbus.
The original plan as presented by
President Clarence Cook Little to the
Big Ten meeting last winter involved
the developing o' two teams of equal
strength to play one game at home
and one away from home each Satur-
day. The plan, as presented, was
supported by the points that it would
practically do away with out-of-town
exoduses to games on the part of the
student body, that it would provide
athletic training for all and thus more
nearly approach the real idea of col-
legiate athletics, and by the the fact
that the arrangement would greatly
relieve congestion in the great stadia
of the universities, in order that ad-
ditional building would not have to be
undertaken for many years.
Plan Previously Approved.
Last spring at the May-meeting of
the Big Ten representatives the plan
was approved in principle by the
faculty men present, and it is pre-
sumed that since that time the various
Faculties of the Conference univer-
sities have approved to the extent that
the adoption was possible at the meet-
ing held last week-end in Chicago.
The arrangement carries through to
all of the major corts, with the re-
sult that two Varsity teams will event-
ually be chosen in track, baseball, and
basketball as well as in football, thus
providing opportunities for twice as
many students to participate in inter-
collegiate competition.
DR. BYRON BIGGS,
HOSPITAL HEAD,
TAKEN BY DEA TH

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automobile swerved into a ditch and
turned ovr the night of Nov. 26.
Miethe's case was not brought up
before the discipline committee until
esterdtav owim to the fact that lie
jxvas only recently released fm'omitUmni-
versi ty hospital where lie was taken
folow1 ing the accident.. Evidence in-
troduced before the committee showed
that he has driven the same car on
several previous occasions in Ann Ar-
bor. Although be has a permit to
drive his own ca', the permit is re-j
stricted to use of the car for business
purposes only.

3MONTHS' WORK
mUSIC WRITTEN BY LEWIS
Wall And Dougall Are Co-Authors Of
E Book Aud Lyrics For Mimes'
- ~2nd PIroduc'tionu
Inaugurating their 22nd successive
season in the college opera field,
Mimes of the Michigan Union last
night in the Whitney theater gave the
first performance of their 1927 pro-
duction, "The Same To You." The

Corming as an outgrowth of the plan presented by 'resident
Clarence Cook little to the Big Ten meeting last December, the uni-
Versities of the \estern Conference have adopted the plan of hav-
ing two football teams each for the season of 1928, it was announcd
by Prof. Hielding 11. Yost, (lirector of intercollegiate athletics, yester-
lay. Vach team will play one complete schedule of eight gaines, ac-
cording to I rocesso)r Yost, alid during next yeai-, at least, the teams
tvil int be of equal strength.
\\ hile arrangements for the change had not been completed by the
Athletic association officials last night, Professor Yost stated that it
is probable that both squads will be kept together next year, and
that the men will be group)edi into A and B divisions, with easy trans-
fer from one group to the other. Neither squad will in any way be
connccteoi with the reserve squad as constituted at present, since in-
eliqible imen are noxw allowed on tle reserve squad while all them nien

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e,#~rin~t ir, !-hc cniinni nr >r lioo c i nr

the crowds in the galleries and on the sutelnt in the snuom or curege ur

floor. The senators-elect were called
up in groups of four and five such
groups had taken the oath before
Smith's name was reached.
Vare was halted before lie even
made a start, as there was no move
on his part to leave his seat. Thus
he escaped the trying moments Smith
had as he stood in the aisle during
the reading of the indictment which
the Nebraska independent leveled
against him.
Both senators-elect were directed to

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whose officers he votes. He must also

have entered the University either

i the tole last night after 24 hours
notice.

ibis fall or last February with no ad -
vae r'dits, or must possess less VARIED COLDORED LIGH 'TING EFFECTS
ie n-4 hours of University credit at TO BE USED AT SOPHOMORE PROM
t present ime. .
An opportunity will be given at all
of the elections for the challenging Subdued and colored lighting effects fair, has been engaged to provide the
of votes which are not cast by mem- will be employed Friday night in tie D music for the eveniig.
)bens of the class! ball room of the Union for the Peren- Decorations indicative of Christmas
nial Sophomore Prom, the first for- atmosphere have been planned and
FIGHT BRUSH FIRE mal all-acinpus party of the year. will be hung by the Goodhew Floral
' VI A huge crystal ball has been oh- shop. Favors in the form of desk
I oA P A r irIC Cf A .S T tainedl by the committee in charge ofI clocks wiii be distributed betwveen 3

You" will be given every night this
week at the Whitney beginning at 8:15
o'clock. There will be a matinee on
Saturday afteroonm. Most of the seats
for the Ann Arbor performances have
been sold, but a few are still avail-
able.
ThekOpera will entrain for Chicago
a week from Friday, the day that va-
cation begins in all schoolsand col-
leges of the University. where the
first out-of-towvn performances will be
given at the Auditorium theater. The

Dr. Byron E. Biggs, aged 46, assis-
tant director of the University hos-
pital, died Sunday evening at the
hospital of heart trouble after a two
months' illness.
Dr. Harley Haynes, director of the
hospital said "Doctor Biggs was a very
efficient man and had all the qualities
required for a person in the position
he held. He was a fine man and will
be missed by all who knew him here."

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