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September 24, 1927 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATUR

'SITY TOURNAMENT QUALIFIERS

SCORE

UNDER

I

A n i TrvEDLIFF SLAUGH TER
R CHOSEN AS COACH
WAY TO FIELD li n i

r.'I

Loiw Scores Feature in Medal Play;
Cole And Waterbury Fail
To Qualify
CONNOR FINISHES THIRD
Although Dave Ward's 68 and Bill
Courtney's 70 remained first and sec-
ond low qualifying scores, the golf
played yesterday measured up to the
standard set by the exceptionally low
scores Thursday, and when all en-
trantsnwere init was found that a 75
was needed to qualify, while in all
previous years a 79 average was cer-'
tain to put one inside the first six-
teen. .
Perhaps more surprising than even
the low scores were the upsets when
Ralph Cole, '28, a veteran of two years
experience, finished two strokes out-
side the first sixteen with a 77, and
Waterbury, an AMA winner and count-
ed one of the lest of next year's pros-
pects., turned in an 80.
Ward's fine score made him medal-
list for the second successive year. He
has an enviable golf, record,-state
amateur champion last year, runner-
up this year, and qualifier in the Na-
tional Amateulr championship.
Courtney, second low qualifier, is
the Detroit Municipal champion and
has distinguished himself in other
tournaments this summer. Captain
Connor was third low with a 71, while
Vyse, a letter man, and Glover, an,
AMA winner, were tied for fourth
place with 72's.
D. Ward, '30,-68, plays C. Hall,
'28,-74. J. Glover '28,-72, plays R.
Livingstone, '31-74. A. Cohen, '30,-
75, plays H. Rhodes, '28,-73. A. Con-
nor, '28-71, plays N. Noble, '28-74.
A. Vyse, '28-72, plays J. Bergelin,
'29-74. J. Morse, '28,-75, plays D.
Mackenzie, '29,-74. W. Berger, '30,-
75, plays W. Wenzull, '29-73. W.
Courtney, '30,-70, plays G. White,
'29,-74.
All matches must be played off by
Wednesday, Sept. 28,bandno matches
will be allowed on the Ann Arbor
course Saturday or Sunday. The time
for matches must be arranged by the
contestants, and phone numbers of
all qualifiers are posted on the tourna-
nment card at the Ann Arbor Country
club.
The Athletic association has pro-
vided ten free fall memberships, and
the recipients of these awards are to
be determined by T. C. Trueblood and
Carlton Wells, directors of golf, on
the basis of the qualifying round, the
results of the match play, and several
other test rounds over the Ann Arbor
(Continued on Page Seven)

Edliff Slaughter
Steller Wolverine guard in 1922,
1923 *and 1924, who has been selected
'as head line coach at North Carolina
after serving for two years, 1925 and
1926, as assistant to George Little.
former Wisconsin mentor.
In 1924 he was honored by Walter
Camp, being placed at one of the guard
berths on his all-American team.
BOWLING LEAGUE'
TO BE ORGANIZED
Interfraternity bowling is to be put
on a more firm basis and systematized
more fully than ever before with the
announcement that an interfraternity
bowling league is to be formed this
winter on the alleys in the new.
Michigan Theater building with H. A
Girardin, '28D, in charge.
The league will be conducted the
same as any other bowling league and
every team in the organization will
play every other team three times dur-
ing the winter. Each fraternity team
is to consist of five men.
A large silver loving cup will be
awarded to the winning group which
will take possession of the trophy for
one year. Whenever the cup is won
twice by the same fraternity it- is to
become the permanent' possession of
that fraternity:

Many Strong Teams!
Aspire To. Big Ten
Grid Championship
That disputed 1927 Big Ten football
gonfalon, the halves of which any
enthusiastic grid fans may see waving
in Evanston and Ann Arbor town, ap-
pears to be in for some keen competi-
tion again this season, even Purdue
threatning along with th others who
promise to render the banner thread-
bare.
Far up North, Mlinnesota way, and
whatever the smart men assemble.
they say this will be a Copher year.
Granted a fair share ofthe breaks se
conspicosly lacking at the Spears
camp of recent years, the Norsemen
are sure to finish near the top.
Rave Good Backlield.
Two backfield men like the power-
'ful Joesting and the clever Barnlitart
are almost enough to strike fear
among college circles. Scrimmaging
at Mineapolis has shown that the All-.
American fullback has lost none of
the tremendous drive which won him
his laurels last year, and the Gophers
are confident that they will recapture
the Little Brown Jug.
Ohio lost a tough game last year be-
fore the immense crowd that thronged
the Memorial Stadium at the Michigan
contestand Dr. Wilce expects revenge
despite the loss of Karow, Hess, and
a few others.
Robert Zuppke compiled a pretty
tough schedule when he placed the
Wolverines and the Wildcats on the
Illinois program on successive Satur-
day's but 14 letter men, including
the redoubtable 'Frosty" Peters, Capt.
Reitsch, Jud Timm, and the rest ex-
pect to overcome the opposition in a
handy fashion.
Interest ii New Coaches.
Much interest surrounds the appear-
ance of new coaches at Northwestern
and Wisconsin. When George Little
retired from the active duties of head
coach to take care of his post as
athletic director at Madison, he land-
ed Glenn T'histlethwaite as Badger
coach.
Northwestern did not bemoan the
loss of the mentor who had piloted
the Purple to their highest pinnacle
since the days of "Paddy" Driscoll
and signed Richard Hanley who prom-
ises a good team will play at the new
Dyche stadium in Evanston every
week.
Part of the training of the terrible
Wildcats this season is the imbibing
of one full quart of ice-cold egg nogg,
and the sensational Capt. Gustafson
and his men already appear to be in
fine mettle for the opening gong.

ALONG THE SIDELINES

By Herbert
With the opening game in the new!
stadium but a week off, no sign hair
yet been given by the coaches as to
which men will be in the lineup when
Michigan meets the Ohio Wesleyan
football team. To the hundreds of
students who have watched the squad
in its workouts and who are speculat-
ing without agreement on who will
be the regulars for 1927 a slight ray
of light may be forthcoming this
afternoon.
At 3 o'clock today, the third
scrimmage of the year is promised,
and although definite announcemei/i
has been withheld, the teams that trota
out on the regular Ferry Field grid-
iron will probably resemble rather
closely a first and second team be-
tween them.
Yesterday's limbering up !frolic
found the entire squad, with the ex-
ception of a couple of cripples, going
through long group workouts acord-
ing to positions. Bovard, center can-
didate was not in uniform, but Puck-
elwartz, Thisted, Gilbert and others
who have been taking only light work
the last few days, were in the thick
of affairs.
Capt. Bennie Oosterbaan is fast
developing into a quadruple threat
man. In addigton to receiving
and throwing passes and running
wiith the ball, the former Maske.
gon star is trying his foot at
booting field goals.
With Hoffman holding the ball and
Thisted as center, Oosterbaan took a
long workout at sending the ball over,
the bar. Later Koffman took a turfs
at place and drop kicking. Hoffman
does not seem to be bothered greatly
by his boils now and may soon see
action. He also worked at passing
with Oosterbaan and also with Tay-
lor.

E. Tedder
more end prospec, also as-
pires to be a triple or quadruple
threat man. Ie seems adept at
the receiving end of passes and in
rl7lursda3-',, scriimmage his punting
was outstanding in the workout,
though scarcely up to Big Ten
calibre. Taylor also took a hand
at tossing passes yesterday..
Although the line came in for mosp,
of the blocking drill, the backfield
and ends were not exemkt from this
form of diversion. Thursday's scrim-
mage showed a great weakness at'
taking out the defensive end, and yes-
terday's work was designed to remedy
this fault. The backs took 'turns ax
blocking and running with apparent
success in a "shadow' scrimmage.
Pekelwartz, who appears to be
one of the best passers on the
squad, .was .given, a thorough
workout at this with the entire
staff of backs and ends on the re-
ceiving end. Oosterbaan clearfy
showed he has lost none of his
skill at iandling the ball. Others
catching passes often included
)onihoff, Nyland, and Hoffman.
The past two days have, among
other things served to bring another
end candidate to the front in Clare
Carter, a sophomore. Thursday's
scrimmage found him almost an in-
surmountable barrier at end, yester-
day he showed to advantage as a re-
ceiver.
If the present crop of ends con-
tinues to show up well it seems as
if the coaches will be drafting
one or two of them for tackle
berths and moving a tackle or so
to guard.
Whether he be head coach or "mere-
ly Director of Intercollegiate ath-
letics, one thing is certain, as long
as Fielding H. Yost is at Michigan, he
will be around the Ferry Field prac-
tices.Hse was an interested spectator
at Thursday's scrimage.

HEILMAN STRIVES
FOR 1927 HONORS,

ApproXintely 30,40 Inlited to
First Came of Year With
Ohlio Wesleyan

See

One week from today, when Michi-
gan plays her first game in the huge
new bowl against Ohio Wesleyan the
University will be host to the boys
from the various high schools of the
state ,and approximately 30,000 are
expected, according to Harry Tillot-
son, business manager of the Ath-
letic association.
Some 2,500 postalcards were sent
out a few days ago to the v'rlious
high schools in the state asking them
to send in applications for the seats
their groups will need. To date
about 50 schools have sent in replie,
requesting 5,000 seats and as yet non3
of the Detroit schools have bee I
heard from.
Indications are, with the 30,000
'guests, that the largest crowd ever to
witness a footlall game in Ann Arbor
will be present to greet Ohio Wes-
leyan and the Wolverines.

. Harry HelmanI
Hard-hitting right fielder of the De-
troit Tigers who is trying to add to
his records by gaining the American
League batting championship for the
'fourth time. Heilman held the honor
in 1921, 1923, and 1925 and now trails
Simmons of the Philadel'hia team by
a few points in the 1927 race.
INTRAMIIrURAL NOTICE
{ All sophomores and second
semester freshmen desiring to
tryout for the Intramural Man-
agerships are requested to re-
* port to the Intramural depart-
ment as soon as possible.

MI CHIOAN TO BE HOST
TO HIGH SCHOOL BOYS

SWIMMING CAN1DIDATES
Students wishing to try out
for the Varsity or freshman
swimming teams are asked to
meet at 4:30 o'clock Monday
afternoon at the Union.
_._, Cach Matt Mann.

t
l
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