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November 11, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

40

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

II A GE T'lIREM

REGENTS TO PROTEST
FLYING OVER STADIUM
AT GAMES IN FUTURE,
RFROLU'T'ION PASSED TO MAKE
IN VESTIGATION OF STATE
AND FEDERAli LAWS
PLANE OWNERS NOTIFIED
Universiy Lawyers C'laim Legislative
Act Limits Height At Which
Aeroplanes May Fly
Steps have been taken, by the Board
of Regents, to halt aeroplanes in their
practice of flying over the stadium
during the football games.
At the last meeting of the Regents,
a resolution was passed, as follows:
"Resolved, that the counsel of the
University be instructed to make an
investigation of Federal and State
laws to ascertain what legal or other
proceedings can be taen to prevent
tl~e flyii*'of aeroplanes over the sta-
dium and other University property."
Air Laws Investigated
In response to this request, Cavan-
augh an Burke, lawyers for the Uni-
versity, inveetigated the laws govern-
idg this po'int. The results of their
research is contained in a letter, re-
cived at the office of Shirley Smith,
secretary of the University, yesterday.
Their opinion runs, in part, as fol-
lows: ,s
"You are advised that the legisla-
ture of this state passed in 1926 an Act
regulating the height at which aero-
planes and other flying machines may
be operated over open air assemblies,
and providing a penalty for the vio-
lation thereof. The Act provides:
'No person shall operate an aero-
plane or other flying machine over
open air assemblies or people at a
heighth of less than 1,500 feet from
the ground, provided that this act
shall not apply to people gathered for
the purpose of witnessing aeroplane
exhibitions and stunt flying nor to
groups asSembled at a flying field.' "
"The penalty for violation of this act
is a fine of not less than $10 nor more
than a $100 or imprisonment not to
exceed 90 days or both fine and im-
prisonment."
May Enforce Laws.
The lawyer's letter gave further
laws passed for aerial navigation and
concluded by stating:
"You are therefore advised that it is
the duty of the executive officer of
the qounty and of the State police to
enforce the Michigan law by making
a complaint against the flyers who
violate the above statutes."
The University authorities have no-
tified the- owners of the aeroplanes
which were ,observed flying over the
stadium during the Ohio State game
and they express a hope that those
aeroplanes and others will observe the
law so as to insure beyond question
the safety of the spectators at the foot-
ball games.
ELECT OFFICERS
OF ITALIAN CLUB
ilection of officers and a discussion
o1 th plans for the coming year were
the main activities at the first meet-
ing of ]I1 Circulo Italiano, Wednesday
afternoon. The officers elected were:
president, Armando V. Giulio, '30, vice-
president, Raymond Richards, '28,
secretary, Helen Cranford, 29, trea-
surer Katherine Peterson,_'30.

LABOR DELEGATES RETURN FROM INVESTIGATION

O'NEILL
DEBATE
FINEST

DECLARES MEMBERS OF SOCIOLOGY
MATERIAL FACULTY WILL PUBLISH
IN YEARS FOUR NEW BOOKS SOON

-', -11---1-- -- r . . .. .........

-i

Pronouncing the 16c auididates for
the Varsity dlebating teamn as perhaps

The sa iO logy department yesterday
ann unc1a ed the p)ublicat ion in the near

the best material that he has ever future of four books by faculty men-
coached, Prof. James -1. O'Neill. of the hers of the departnient. Three of the
wepartment of speech, yesterdy works are in text form and will prob-
f. ~ably be, adopted for' sociology classesc
maintained that he was more than sat- at hi University.
at this 17ivrsty.
isfied with the results of the tryout The text books to be alOpt d are
system of selecting the members for "Community Problems" by Prof. A. E.
the intercollegiate debating team. Wood, "Proba}ion for .Juveniies and
The 16 debaters who remain on the Adults," by Fred R. Johnson, and W.
squad will start their first actual .. Norton's "Cooperative Movements
prepatory work on the question when in Social Work."
they meet this afternoon in the In January Prof. Robert C. Angell's
Adelphi room on the fourth floor of work on the sociological phases of
Angell hall. The meeting is set for contemporary student life will also be
5 o'clock. 1 published under the name of "The
The late start of the actual work on Campus." This book, which is to a
the debates leaves less than a month ,lage extent based on "Professor
before the University of Minnesota Angell's personal observation while at
will open the debating season with a stgent here at Michigan, is the first"
Pictured above are 'the four Chicago mnei, aI American Federation of practice debate, in Hill auditorium, on serious study of student life in rela-
Pcue abearth fotCiaomnalAmrcnFdrto ofDec. 8. Hnt oit vrt eatmtd
Labor delegates, who returned recently from the Hawaiian Islands where they
investigated labo . conditions in the insular possessions.rThey are from left
to right, Charles M. Paulsen, Morti'mer T. Enright, Frank E. Doyle, and
Daniel F. Cleary.
HARVARD HEAD DISCUSSES TREND OF Wear a
N EW H IG HE R EDUC A TION IN AM ERIC A
.u fProfessor Spaulding made very fav-
. (onmue fomPag Oi.viurn omrnt Corsagenierit
sider instructing a mixed group. He orabl ommesi n on the tniversity
recognizes some excellent features of School of Music, and on the treatment
coeducation, but thinks that the trend which is accorded all students. If
will be toward separate buildings for 'nything, he said, students are treated
men and women such as Ohio State is too well here, an if they cannot be- r
now considering. come stars at Mi higan, he said, they
Speaking specifically of Michigan, had better give up.
Corsages, $1.00 to $3.00
I Mums, yellow, 50-75-$1.00 each

THE MARILYN SHOPPE
527 E. Liberty St.
New Michigan Theatre Bldg.
Coat Headquarters
Offering oAly the finest coats at lowest prices. All luxurious
trimmings-Allbeautifl C silk linings-Exquisite styling.
Gorgeous Cloths:

fur

As a remembrance of the football game
buy her a box of
ar
Delicious ocolates
See the windowdisply at

Whlite, with purple N, $1.00 each
Phone for Flowers
Your Credit Is Always Good
THE ANN ARBOR FLORAL CO.

d -
~!
y %i

PRICES
$24.75
to
$59.50/

BROADCLOTHS!
VENICE!

Others From
$16.95 to $99.50

0

VELVONA!
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WOLF-

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BEAVER

AU

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Phone 6215

Drapes! Tailleurs!
'Flares! Shawls!
POPULAR- PRICES!
AL4WAYS !

SWIFT 'S

THE FLOWER SHOP
State at Liberty

Phone 6030

ID rug, Store

4K
M0

CAMPUS FLORIST

Across from Law Building

1 1 15 South University
We Telegraph

Phone 7434

JUST UNPACKED!
50 Charming Formal Frocks! Just in time for the Holiday Festivities.
Georgettes, Chiffons, Taffetas and Velvets, some elaborately leaded
and others styled in bouffants-(Detachable sleeves with most of
them). All the pastel shades and black.
Our Usual Popular Prices Prevail
$14.75 to $29.75

Flowers

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Sink The Navy---

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That's what the team is going
to do. Let us sink your food
troubles for you. If you are inx
doubt as to where you are going
to entertain your guests, dis-
miss it, for our service and food
can not be excelled in Ann
Arbor.
Music Private Booths
WOLVERINE CAFE
The Pride of Ann Arbor
Opp. Wuerth Theater

is

ichigan's fair Co-eds you are
nvited to make our new shoe
department your rendezvous,
C hoosing your footwear will
be a pleasure, the styles are
plIentiful-to

SPE IAL
for
Friday and Saturday
Calfskin Gloves
in the

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arm onize with apparel
every occasion

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for

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Po rP~p
4' UALITY.

k

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THINGS YOU MAY NEED FOR THE
HOME, SORORITY OR FRATERNITY
Chinaware, Dinner and Glassware, Water Glasses, Water Sets,
Tea Sets, Jardiniers, Vases, Book-ends, Cutlery, Alarm
Clocks, Electric Goods, Toys, Gift articles in many
different things. You are sure to find it here.

4QUALITY.T
A R1

Sndividualistic touches are
dominant keynote of our
modes that

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Sive sevice and comfort, com-
bined with a world of beauty;
they

X3.5O

Slip on Wrist

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nswer

the co-eds' prayer
for attractive

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'ovelties at most modei
prices-the values cannot
be equalled.

rate

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