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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1927 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1'

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

Publication in the Bulletin il constructive notice to all members of
the University. Copy received by the Assistant to the Prgsident until
3:30 p. M. (11:30 a. M. Saturday.)

N11imnr W

Vnlnmn 0

WV! NVQTIA V O-rIflRFU 19!_ 11191

L vomme , r ,; r ir V, Uwn.; I, ju u mpier--i
To the Deans:
There will be no conference of the President and the Deans Wednesday,
Oct. 12.
Frank E. Robbins.

For Sale by Buldings and Grounds Department:
Monroe furnace in excellent condition. Suitable for 6 or 7 room house.
Price $50. Phone 9512, Buildings and Grounds dept.
E. C. Pardon, Superintendent.
Faculty of tEa College of Pharmacy:
Faculty of the College of Pharmacy will meet Friday, Oct. 14, at 4:10 p.m.,
in Room 212 Chemistry building.

I

C. C. Glover, Secretary.

Men Students in Physical Education:
All men students enrolled in the four-year curriculum in Physical Educa-
tion are expected to be present at a meeting to be held on Wednesday evening,
October 12th at 8 p,.m., room 20 Waterman Gymnasium. Mr. Elroy Guckert,
former "athletic director at Hillsdale college will speak on the topic, "Recre-
ational Activities in Edrope." Refreshments will be served.
E. D. Mitchell.
Students Planning to Teach Rhetoric:
Students who plan to teach Rhetoric and English Composition should cor-
relate their fields of work early in their college course. Such students are
requested to see Professor R. W. Cowden for information and advice. His
office hours are from 3 to 5 Wednesdays, in Room 3228 Angell Hall.
T. E. Rankin.
Seniors:
Please make appointments with the photographers as soon as possible.
Order slips may be obtained from the business office of the Michiganensian
any afternoon from one until five o'clock. The order costs five dollars, two
dollars of which will be allowed by the photographers on any private order
which may be given before Christmas. The four official studios are Dey,
Randall-Maedel, Rentschler, and Spedding. Please act now and avoid a rush
at the expiration of the time limiti
Economics Club:
'Meets Friday, October 14, at 7:45 p.m., in Room 302 of the Union. Dean
Edmund E.-Day will speak. Members of staffs and graduate students in Econ-
omics and Business Administration are invited.,
Z. C. Dickinson.
Student Mathematical Society:
The Student Mathematical Society will meet Thursday, October 13, at 7:30
in Room 3017 Angell Hall. Two papers will be given. All interested in Mathe-
matics are invited to attend.
Madelyn C. Kingsley, Secretary.
Romance Club Meeting:
The first meeting of the Romance Club will be held .this evening at 8:00
o'clock at the Michigan Union. All graduate students in the Department of
Romance Languages are cordially invited to be present.
Julio Del Toro.
lluummers Dramatic Society Tryouts:
Tryouts for Mummers Dramatic Society, this afternoon at Newberry Audi-
torium, from 3:00 to 5:00.
Ithmer Coffman, President.
Cercle Francais:
There will be, a meeting of Cercle Francais Wednesday, October 12 at
7:15 p.m., in room 202 South Wing, for the purpose of organizing and forming
plans for the coming year. All last year's members ai e earnestly requested
to be present.'
Milo S. Ryan, President.
Chi Delta Phi:
There will be a meeting tonight at 7:30 in 204 South Wing. $'
Kathryn Francis, President.
Tryout Manuscripts for Ci Delta iPhi:
All tryout manuscriptts are to be in box in Barbour Gymnasium by Fri-
day, October 21.
Kathryn Francis, President.
A.S.C.E.:
Important meeting tonight, Wednesday, October 12, at 7:30 at the
Union.
. M. Salmond, President.
Tryouts for Adelphi:
All candidates for admission whose applications already have been filed I
with the clerk and whose names are from N to Z inclusive, are requested to
report in the Adelphi Room, 4th floor Angell Hall, Saturday morning, October
15, at 10:00 a.m. They must come prepared to give a five minute speeeh on
any subject of their own choice. Robert J. Gessner, Speaker.
Scabbard and Blade:
There will be a regular meeting tonight at the Union promptly at 7:15
p.m. It is requested that all members be present for the meeting without fail.
P. E. Slayton.

NEW EVIDENCE ON FALL BRIBING
TO BE GIVEN IN OIL LEASE TRIAL
With the government's conspiracy interviewed these men, both of whom
trial against Albert 13 Fall, tormer have been abr oad for two years evad-
secretary of the interior, and Harry ing government summons.
F. Sinclair, oil producer, opening on The Supreme Court (-esterday
Oct. 17, government counsel Atlee handed dowvn a decision in the case
Pemerene, former senator from Ohio, of the Teapot Dome in which it is
hopes to obtain valuable information asserted that the lease arranged be-
from Harry M. Blackmer and James tween Secretary Fall and Sinclair
E. O'Neill concerning the allegedl "was made fraudulently bye means of
bribing of Fall. Senator Pomerene collusion and conspiracy between
went to Europe recently where he them.'
Corr ptio Chaged business and professional life after
- college. H-i declares that the pre-
In Glass Elections valent belief that high scholarship in
-' college does not presage success later
OJn Indiana Campus is mistaken. As a result of an investi-
it tngation he proved that 14 out of 15
(tyo Associted Press)g n
BLOOMINGTON, mnd., Oct. 11--"Po- honor students attained success while
litical corruption" if charges are true, but 1 in 46 of the other graduates were
has found its way into campus a ucc- as successful as the honor students.
tions at Indiana university.
- Student politicians have been aros
bd over revelations by the Indiana
Daily Swtunt, camp cnewspaert lAmnd So the
"Corrupt"in onn withrte usnssad rfesonllieafe
elections of class officers last week
The "corruption" has been confin-
ed to under class elections, accor isng i
to information appearing in the Stu- YOU HAveN'T Ao
dent which outlined the situation s)his WORLD *S rOU STA
way: I$EE TME BEST TEA1l4
Nine of 12 signatures on a nominat- hn sd st AS e HAS HAl
ing petition filed in the sophomore .oe rUa YOUR AN
election were forgeries.-I
The nominee for sophomore presi- /
dent was expelled from school two
days before the election, while the
nominee for treasurer never enterede nd S otheA /
chek u f i niversity credits of hh
candidates revealed that a nomjinee
for senior treasurer was not a mem-
for junior nresident was not a jun-
everalunerclssetons, avng obtain12
ioi and a nominee for sophoSAre
president was not a sophomore.I
'ie12signatures oapoosed omslat-of '111111 H S A
ing spet son sl d n th o ph o m re w P E UF120 R
freshman officers, iroceeded to erase
the names of nominees and sustitute SO
da differe t slate without consulting
the signers ot the petition.
DEBA TE TR YOUTS .SowNBFOE TE
TO DISCUSS NEW WTA
CRIME PRINCIPLE A
Chek f nivrstycrdit oAP1'

expense o e a ? . va' .s, 1 o s an~c st a are1s, ".h )t'r'C 011nt and
course, with the individual and with general expenses 2.8 per cent.
the kind of course he takes. The total income cliargeal)le to the
Of the total about three-fourths is business of education was $4,356-
personal expense to the student, or 194.27. The total expense, accounta-
his parents. The remaining thousand ble in the same way, was $4,379,098.-
(Icilars or so is the investment the 68. The (lifterence was carriedl over
aeieu lmuioao lezapalI o1p puhe alt from the previous year as part of the
in him as evidence of their faith in current assets.
the value of higher education. Students this year will pay a larg-
Pased on the annual financial re- er share of the cost of eperating Ohio
port of the University for the year State University, since fees in all but
ending June 30 last, it cost, on an the Colleges of Medicine, Dlentistry,
average, $3:36 per student to operate and Law, where they already weie
Ohio State University during the last much higher, have been advanced $5
academic session. There were 13,023 per quarter to $20.
students. The University estimates the ex-
This amount, it is worth noticing, pense of the average student coming
showed a marked decline over two here from out of the city at $658 a
years ago and was also smaller than year, including fees, laboratory de-
lie figure for four years ago. In posits, books, board, room, and gen-
1925 the cost of maintaining Ohio eral expenses.
1tate University was computed at -
$432 per student. Two years earlier eT th
it was estimated at $352. The shrink- DeanDay TO Return
age lies chiefly in the fact that the
building and other capital equipment . ursday Forisit,
program last year was comparatively -
small. New buildings, additions to Edmund E. Day, dean of the school
buildings, and purchases of land, of business administration now on
however are regarded as permanent
investment rather than ordinary ex- of absence for one year, for the
pense, purpose of research work, will re-
Of thQ total expense of operating turn to Ann Arbor for a visit Thurs-
the University the state and the Fed- day, to sthy until Saturday night.,
cral government bear about seven- Dean Day will hold a conferance
Seighths of the cost, while the stu- resident Clarence co
dent (or his parents) meet the re- t se Cookittl
mainder. That is tow say, the fees during his stay here, and will also
received from studentp last year to- address the Econdmics club at its
taled $556,159.31, but averaged only meeting Friday night at the Union.
about forty-three dollars per student
or 12.7 per cent of the cost.-
Of the amount expended for edu- Detroit Alumni Will
cation there last year 79.4 per cent
came from state appropriations, 12.7 H ve pecial Trains
per cent from students, 4.7 per cent
from department earnings, 2.2 per Special trains to all out of town
cent from the Federal Government, football games have been arranged
half of 1 per cent from the endow- for Detroit alumni by the U. of M.
ment, and only three-tenths of 1 per Club of Detroit. These will include
cent from gifts to the University.. trips to Madison October 15, Urbana
On. the side of expenditures, in- October 29, and Chicago November 5.

COST OF COLLEGE E
$4,000 PER YE
It costs, on the average, about $4,-
000 to put a student through a four-
year university course, figures re-
ently compiled at Ohio State Univer-
sity shew. This sum includes the
Z personal cost to the student and the
vflnlu, to-n thin' cflt t it rflria f

DUCATION IS
:AR, FIGURES SHOW
struction cost the greatest share, 63.
per cent. Buildings and other capi- j
tal betterments cost 13.4 per cent.
upkeep and operation of the physical
pllnt 12.4 per cent, administration
3.8 cr cent, the Library, including1
b k~r n1d - In iC ':f e ., 1r

In honor of thiree student editors
of the l'dichigain Law Review who
a re from Toledo, Ohio, the University
of Michigan Club of Toledo held a
.pecial meeting yesterday at which
Dean I enry M. Bates of the La\v
shchol delivered the principal address.
This is the first time since the found-
img of the Michigan Law Review in
1902 that three of the twenty stu-
dent editors are from Toledo. Those
who were thus honored are Leslie
Henry '28L, Julius Jacobs, '28L, and
Oscar Sattinger, '28L.
In aldditioln to being elected to the
Law Review editorial board, Henry
was awa-ded the class of 1908 memor-
ial scholarship, awarded annually to
that member of the senior class who
has attained the highest scholastic
record on the work of the preceding
year. Dean Bates presented the
award in the absence of its donor,
Attorney Guy B. Findley of Elyria,
Ohio.
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, Prof. Ho-
hart R. Coffey, Prof. Joseph H. Drake,
Prof. Grover C. Grismore, Prof. Vic-
or 11. ].aiie, Prof. Paul A. Leidy, and
Prof. l orace L. Wilgus, all of the
Law school and former Ohioans, ac-
corn-panied Dean Bates to the gather-
ing as guests of the alumni associa-
tion. In addition, more than twenty
fortier student editors of the Law
Review, now practicing law in Tole-
do, were present as guests of the
association.
NORTHWESTERN- Contemporary
thought lectures are being broadcast
from WNMAQ, The Chicago Iiaily News
station under the direction of Baker
Brownwell, professor of the course
and director of the department of
contemporary thought, Northwestern
university.

AT ALUMgNIFUNCTION
Tlhi'e IAIW Studenits FeIC4I at Spceial
3leetlng hld Tuesdmay; Seveni
Profesors Also Attend
TOLEDO EDITORS iONORE,')

ii

)

y Was Utterly Ruined aBysBRIOGS

?i N T-HE
RTi OUT 1T4
7 THAT DEAR~
V? IN YEARfS
joENT RIVAL.
A 1OUH

AND -IbU HAVE A CTRAND GA FEsr
WITH AL-L- THEi OLD GANG You
HAVE'T -,E.E SINE LA

AA ~'M1$kE'KEND7ALL GIVES YOU OPZ5
OF3 TcI,AND Irr5 (31AN.DLARCENY
To-TAK~r MC'S aN
- aO'RE ON FOR
ANA 5So THE -PAY: )5
UJTTERLY( RVIN.

I

_ GAMsE is

Entertainment of Speakers on Oratorical Lecture Course:
Will individuals or organizations wishing to entertain speakers on
Oratorical Association Course, kindly communicate with me.
It. D. Hollister.
University Club Members:
First Club Night is on Friday the 14th at 8:15 p.m. This is a good
portunity to bring new faculty nmbers as guests.
Program Committee.

the
op-

Garden Section, Faculty Womei's Club:
The first regular meeting of the Garden Section willI
Cctober 12, at 3 p.m., at thq home of Mrs. A. B. Moehlman,
Dora L.

be held Wednesday,
Barton Hills.
Dice, Secretary.

Speeches on either side of the
question-resolved: "That the prin-
ciples of the Baume's law of - New
York should be enacted into law by
the other states," will constitute the
tryout speeches of the candidates for
the debating team squad, according to
Prof. James M. O'Neill, of the depart-
ment of speech.
The speeches are to be limited to
five minutes, and all men wishing to
try out should register in the de-
partment of speech office, in Angell
hall, before October 25.
The tryouts will be held Tuesday,
Nov. 1, in the afternoon and evening,I
in room 4203 Angell hall. The con-!,
tests are 'to he limited Ito under-
graduate students, as the Central
League debates are likewise limited.
The University will debate North-
western and Ohio State universities,
meeting Northwestern here, and Ohio l
State at Columbus, on January 20,J
1928.
HONOR STUDENTS
ARE SUCCESSFUL
According to Prof. Hugh Allison of
the University of Wisconsin men and
women who have been successful in f
college workare usually successful in

SIWVAS-\-
74 16

ANP THEN YO U :5UDENLY
1>15COVER YcU'VL SMOK<ED YOV
LAST OLD L~"LD At.)i2, CAT-
GET AI'1NY Oa nLt.. YOUj. $ET
13AC K rTo 'AN..

r

r

-PH1IS 15"TE R0 T'Tr4ST
TERM THEY IvER HADT'HE'
SETTER GET A 'NEW COACH
OR F'LAYAJASSAf

--1

i

,

.....

iPhi Eta Sigma:
All members are urged to attend the initiation and banquet to be held
October 18th in Room 302, Michigan Union. Please call at the office of the
Dean of Students, Room 2, University Hall, and pay the $1.25 banquet fee.
Leonard A. Scheele, President.
Sophoniores and Second Semester Fre $hmen:
An initiation and banquet for all those eligible to membership in Phi Eta
Eigma (Freshman Honorary Fraternity)' will be held in Room 302, Michigan
Union, Tuesday, October 18, 1927, at 5:30 p.m.. All candidates are expected to
report at the office of the Dean of Students, Room 2, University Hall, and pay
the $7.50 initiation and banquet fee before that date.
Leonard Schlee, President.

O L , InOLD
Tke Smoother and Better Cigrett&
.:.~.not a cough in a carload

- rihee
sl t t F r r 4

*1W, ._ l -14

15f

©1927, P. Lorillard Co., Est.1760

A

SENIORS!

Make your Ensian appointment NOW

38 YEARS OF SENIOR EXPERIENCE AT YOUR COMMAND

Gr? _o

B Al Z.lir.~ ~ ia. 4. .a I-1~ *1e

C-1 w ' s

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