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October 04, 1927 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-10-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TVIESDAY OOl03t 4. V

T

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BL~ S XIIION
DISPLAY INCLVTI)E' ORIGINAL1
LEITTfRS AND PAPERS
OF G ENRAL
SURRENDER EXPLAM3D
Lett4rs Anrid Retporb Rs eveaI In fill~te
Story ofTBattles, And ArgamninP
Excha nged II th f8e
Commemnorating the 150th. annivers-
ary of the surrender of General Bur-
goyne, the Clements library has on dis-
play original letters an(I plans of the
campaign of Burgoyne. The material
has been obtained from the Clinton
papers, pat of the collection of the
British Headquarter papers which M.
Clements purchased two years ago.
In the exhibit is Burgoyn~es letter
to General Howe explaining his sr-
render, and letters to General Clinton
relating the facts of the surrender o1
40 Saratoga.
During the Revolution Lord George
Germain was the governor of the
colonies and it was to hrim that the
general took the suggestionl that Gen-
eral Howe should travel from New
York and meet General Burgoyne and
his troops who were to make n expe-
dition down the St. Lawrence..1Had
this proved successful Ameorica's
struggle for independence might have
been another British colonial upri sing.
Vern~ahi Fails Promise
Lord Germain who agreed to the
plan had his secretary draw up order;
to General Howe, left for a week-end
trip without signing them. When hie
reurned hie had forgotten them and
beneraP Hiowe Proceeded to Philadel
phla as he had been instructed. Bur-
goyne, With 6,000 men, instead of 12,-
000 as he had asked, began his expedi-
tion. The troops were inadequately
supplied and unable to work with full
S ,e f ieiency.
To add to the troubles the Canadian
governor refused to give the general
assistanlce in keeping the forts e had
capt'ured. 'This necessitated 'leaving
detachments behind to hold the cap-
tured 'territory:
He continued south until he met
NGeneral Gates of the Colonial troops
Gates had 16,000 men who, accordin,
to Burgoyne, were wiling to figh
while his army numbered .,500 o
which less than -2,000 were British.
)Beaten By Siperpr Numbers
In the letters and reports of the
general it was a close fight, but su-
perior u~imbers and inferior suppliete
caused his downfall. When surrender
seemed imminent he sued for a treaty
tpon the advice of the sarmy cabinet.
The original terms seemed insulting
to him and were rejected. However
he wrote to General Clinton that a
the seconid meeting he dictated th
terms and was highly pleased with th
r'esult,
General Washington gave him per-
mission to return to England, where
he went to clear his name. He wrote
a letter vindicating himself and hi
cause was so popular that it went to
six editions and was translated to
Germlan. He was given what wa
practically an informal court martial
but the case he ?presented exonerated
him. almost completely.
Beside being a great general Bur
goyne had quite a talent as a writer.
One play, "The Heiress," had ten
editions the first yeear, and was fam-
ous on the stage. He aligned himself
with a political party and his writings
were effective in thei bitter irony.

i

Prominent Libaria
Of Oberlin College'
Passes Away Supday,
News of the dleath of A. S. hoot-, li-
brarian of Oberlin college, «wc:-,re-
ceived yesterday fr onm Mr. XV. W. Bis-
hop, University librarian.
Mr. Boot, who was torn in 13G~2 dieud
Sunday at his home, Oberlin, Ohio.
lHe was a former priesident of the 1;ibl-'
iographical society of America and of
the American Libxarian's association.
and a fellow of the American Librar-
ian's institute. H-e held A.B3. and A.Mv.
degrees received at Oberliii college.
"Mr. Root was undloubtedlly the fore-
most librarian in America," said Mtr.
Bfsiop, "andl a very extratordiniary
man. He was especially in trs di
early lrinting aall was an expert its
that line. Mr. IAhot was th1., most
scholarly librartn of' my accua.int-
anice a:-ad onie of' m"y wairnmesl friends.
At Oberlin colle o he performen'd an
e ioimou's of work with little hell, and
several times he was nm<?'ade atingf
president of the, college. i e taugh ltI
here at Michigan for four summlers,j
andrc gave elemnentary courses for Ii-
lirarians. He also gave a course ati
Columbia university for colloee1l-1
brarians. As an expert of early print-
ing, he sp3ent some time in Holland3
andl discovered many interesthinpg sub-
pects, but he had not written anything 1
on the subject upl to the time of his
dleath."
P ATERNlALISMIS
TOPIC OFf'DbEBATE
Alpha Nui, the only national
rorensic socity'on the campus, will
lebate the question: Resolved, that
oaternalismn in college is beneficial to,
.tudents, at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the1j
society's room on the fourth floor ofj
- Angell hall. i
Lyle E. Eiserman, '30L, president: ofI
Alpha Nut, announced the following
members as debators for this evening:
Toseph Howell, '30 and Howard Si-
'non, '30, affirmative; Jack Webster,
30P, and John Laffgdon, '29, negative.I
r'he student body has expressed very
lefiite opinions on many phases of
this* subject, and this debate is in-
:nddto cover all1 the elements of
)aternalism which confront the aver-
:1ge student. At the close of the (10-
')ate the question will be thrown open
:o the society for a general disciis

' PIM A T% N-q th Ar r-V M Ar W-W -

1- U lk

IEMBER
J3?YPD PARTY

NF1)
outhyPole.

Hinsdale Publishes
Small Volume About
Washtenaxv Indians!
Ind ians of \Wja lit eia w County''
is t ii ( tIitle of a small, volumelc recently
p)u iliSlie( by Dr. XV. 11. IHinsdale of the
archeological (d 'iartmnmt 0ofthe U ni-j
Vceiy iyMseum1.
This volume, although of only (68
pages, is fiite comp~let e. The various
rihes which held sway over thisf
re'gion n: ififerent periods a'Ie ('1111-
eara trcd, ant1 the history and in ig ration
of e a ", insol'ar as t hey airc known,
are g vei The habits and customs. of.
these tribes are (detailedl and the
proba ble sites of their villages in
Washtenaw count are piilt ed out. The
names *1 mi~any of the townis and see-,
Lin. in the county are derived di-
recetly hocrn t he Indian names. In the
latter part of the brochure, enti tied.
'"DO We OWe t he Ind ian Anything-?"
Drm. Hinsdale e(inaerat es 0the various
proseont day comi modlit ies uwhichiare
our hierit age from IndianIi (ays.
'Ina add it ion to the text, there arej
Smany pages of ill ustrat ions of im Ie-1
njols 0 (of oestic u.;ongid warlik~eI
nainme. In the back of thme volume is a
liia1) at' the countrmy shiowing the I ndian
trails, villages, burying mounds acid
s ilt spring s.

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