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June 03, 1927 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

__._

ISOCIATIO N
STITUTION

Lindbergh May Return To United States
On American Liner "George Washington"

Made In Method Of Elections;
Ifcatlons For lMembership
Are Also Alatred.
STEE BOARD IS CUT
general meeting of the mem-
he Student Christian associa-
ad recently at Lane hall,
ents to the charter were
usly passed providing for a
hod of electing the president
alteration of the necessary
ions for membership which
e determined in the by-laws.
rd of trustees was reduced
members to 7, five of which
e elected. The other two are
president and vice-president
ssociation, one of whom must
nan. Contrary to general be-
.en are as eligible to member-

EDUCATOR VISITS
AT COOLEY HOME
Dr. Ira N. Hollis, for twenty years
Professor of Engineering at Harvard
University, and for ten yeal's president'
of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute,
is a guest at the home of Dean Morti-
mer E. Cooley. He and Dean Cooley
were classmates at the Naval Acad-
emy. Dr. Hollis is now retired from
active professional work and makes1
his home in Cambridge.,

Plans Are Made For
Oratorical Program
Plans to provide a suitable program
for next-year's Oratorical association
are now under way, according to Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister, head of the public
speaking department. Definite an-
nouncement of the speakers and com-
plete arrangements will not be made,
however, until early in the summer, it
is expected.

Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke

CORNWELL COAL --COKE

The SECOND S. S. RYNDAM
?OLLEGE CRUISE.
ROUND THE WORLD
SEPTEMBER'TO MAY
Why stay within four walls when
The World and all the Countries
Of the Seven Seas are calling You?
THE WORLD "IS OUR CLASSROOM
A University for Men. College Courses studied dur-
ing a school year around the World. Enrollment
a° p limited to 375 young- mein, 17 or more years of. age.
Visit 27 countries. Study under competent
professors and instructors, aboard ship, in
foreign lands.
Professor Lionel Crocker
Representative

This business has boen growing ever
since it was established.' The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction to our
customers," We believe it pays todo
basiskcss in s firiendly way. If 'youi
think so to, lot's get together.

ship as men.
The five members of the board of
trustees for the coming year were
elected at this time. They are: Mrs.
J. W. Bradshaw, President Clarence'
Cook Little, Eugene S. Clarkson, Ira
lM. Smith, registrar of the University,
and Frank E. Royce. This board of
trustees will have complete control of
the finances, property and policies of
the Association.
To take care of the general activ -
ties of the association a cabinet con-
sisting of 12 members has been pro-
vided. At least seven of this number
must be students. The president,
vice-president and the chairman of the
board of trustees' are automatically to
be members while the other nine are
to be elected. Women are also to be
members of this cab net.
DEBS AW PRJE
SUPPORTEDf BY UNIONS

CORNWELL COAL - COKE
OFFICE, CORNWELL BLOCK
Phones,Office : 4551-45 Yard Office: 5152
Read The Daily "Classified" Column

College Cruise Students at
KamakuraJapan

University Travel Association, Inc.
285 Madison Ave., New York City n

United State Liner "George Wash ington" on which the, presidential suite
has been reserved for Captain Charl es A. Lindbergh's return to the United
States. It is the suite which Preside nt Wilson ocoupied when he went to
the peace conference.
LAS' PRACTICE HOLDS DIFFICULTIES
FOR WOMAN GRADUA T E, SAYS DEAN

I

Local labor unions in 30 states, as
well as mnany international unions,
have already responded with financial
support to the efforts of the Debs
Memorial Radio Fund, 31 Union
Square, New York City, to establish a
high-power radio broadcasting station
in honor of the late Eugene V. Debs,
noted labor leader, from which pro-,
gram.3 of interest to the progressive
and labor elements of the country will-
be featured, 'According, to Norman
Thomas, chairman of the fund, money
is pouring in from unions of every
shade,,'from extreme conservatism to
the im'ost progressive, to complete the
$250,000 fund.
The campaign received renewed
stimulus with announcement by the
fund's trustees that an already estab-
lished' station in the East is on the
point of being- purchased and that
labor programs on the air will become
a, speedy reality. Plumbers, boiler-
makers, needle workers, carpenters,
molders, bakers, railway men, mach-
inists, seamen and other craftsmen
are sending 4in contributions from
all over the land, Mr. Thomas declar-
ed yesterday. The Workmen's Circle,
with a national membership, has re-
sponded from many lqcalities, Mr.
Thomas added:
"Station WDEBS, as it will be called
when it changes hands," Mr. Thomas
said, "will not be'a cold and pompous
structure, but 'a living instrument of
social service, a high-power radio
station, to be operated in the interests
of all progressive movements and
ideas and in the aid of all struggles
for social justice in the tolerant and
broad minded spirit of Gene Debs."
While every- shade of liberal and
labor opinion is represented on the
Board of Trustees' to insure a non-
sectarian presentation of opinion over
WDEBS, labor leaders of national
reputation are prominent among ther.
They include James H. Maurer, presi-
dent of the Pennsylvania State Fede-
ration of Labor;- William Mitch, sec-
retary-treasurer, 'District No. 11,'
United Mine workers; Albert F. Coyle,
editor, Brotherhood of Locomotive En-
gineers' journal; Sidney Hillman,
president, Amalgamated Clothing
Workers' of America; Abraham Baroff,
secretary - treasurer, International
Ladies' Garment Workers' union:
Joseph Baskin, Workmen's circle, and
A. Philip Randolph, Pullman Porters'
union.
It is expected that Station WDEBS
will tie up with Station WCFL of
Chicago, owned by the Chicago Fede-
ration of Labor, and become part of
a nationwide circuit of proposed
broadcasting stations. Labor on the
Pacific coast is contemplating such a
station, while one is being planned for
the national capital.
CHANGE DATES FOR GOLF
TOURNEY TO JUNE 9, 141

"Although women may be equal or
even superior to men students in
scholarship, there is a question as .to
the desirability of a law training for
a woman," said Henry M. Bates, dean
of the law school, in an interview yes-
terday. Dean Bates went on to say
that the law training was not partic-I
ularly distasteful to the young woman
but that the actual law practice in
after life was too rough and unpleas-j
ant to be desirable.#
"Law firms, as a rule, do not want
to employ women members because
the duties of the younger members of
the law firms are often hazardous and
rough, and no man in charge cares to
send a woman on a mission that heI
knows will be unpleasant as well as
dangerous," said Doan Bates in~.ex-
plaining the difficulties of a woman's
law practice.
Dean Bates pointed out the fact that
the few women who have graduated
HISTORICAL LETTERS

Purchase Of Historical Paintings. ByI
Texas Legislatuie Enables School
To Obtain Documents
AWARD IS CONDITIONAL:
AUSTIN, Tex., June 2.-If a recent
actioni of the state senate is taken as
favorable, the University of Texas
may soon become the owner of- a large
number of historical letters and docu-
ments pertaining to the history of the
state -from the time of the first set-
tlement by Americans to its entty into k
the Union.
The finance committee of the upper
legislative body recently voted itself
to be in favor of appropriating $25,000
to buy two famous paintings of Texan!
historical interest. These paintings
are now hanging upon the walls, of!
the senate chamber' and were hungI
there by the artist, Harry Arthur Mc-
Ardle, in 1895. If these paintings are
purchased, the collection of docu-
ments will be given gratis.
The letters were collected by thej
artist and give unusually accurate ac-
counts of the state's early history,
most of which is in connection with
the battle of San Jacinto, as no sur-!
vivors were left after the fall of the
Alamo. These two battles are the
subjects of the paintings, which are
said to be quite exact in their histor-
ical reproductions.

from the law school have found it ex-
tremely difficult to obtain positions, as
the only openings to be had are with
firms that deal with women clients and
have a need for a woman employee.
Very few women make good as prac-
ticing lawyers, because the strain of
the battles in court is too great, the
dean said.
In reference to his recent talk to
prospective women law students, the
dean stated that his intention in giv-
ing the talk was not to discourage the
women, but merely to point out the
'difficulties and discouragements of law
practice.
FRESHMAN GROUP
WILL NOT DISBAND
Instead of disbanding at the close
of the first year, Waldo Abbot's fresh-
man advisory group of this year is
planning to keep together during the
remainder of its four years at col-
liege.
Mr. Abbot plans to utilize the mem-
'hers of this years' group in this way
as his assistants with the groups' of
later years, thus aiding in carrying
out to its greatest extent President
Clarence Cook Little's plan for hu-
manization of the incoming classes.
The first expression of these plans.
'was made at a recent banquet given
at the Union to the group, as a result
of is scoring the highest number of
points in contests with each of the
other faculty groups 'in basketball,
bowling, swimming, bridge, and spell
ing.
Minnesota Business
School Is Criticized
Declaring that the Minnesota school
of Business Administration gave him
no really valuable knowledge or train-
ing but instead a "sad sick empty feel-
ing" George Jacobson a senior has
written an article in the Minnesota
Business News severely criticising
the present methods in training for
the business world.
He states that the choice and organ-
ization of material under the present
system is both confusing and monoto-
nous to the average undergraduate
and asks for a revision that will im-
part a more scientific and humane at-
titude to the prospective business man.
Few ideals can survive under the
present method is his contention.
Students at Stanford university who
are working their way through school
receive their textbooks free.

r
,. .. ,

4

HEN the first frost is in the
thousands .of students
return to Ann Arbor. They

must at that time select the organ-
izations with which they wish to
do business during the coming

The Annual Fall Elction

college year.

In order to select

a Laundry which will give you
the utmost in satisfying service

Je

;,

U

U I

SPECIAL SALE

On

ELECT

FIRESTONE TIR ES

THE FOLLOWING SIZES
,r, ,rrseerrer1, r,.rorrsr.rcr

(By Associated Press)
ANN ARBOR, Mich., June 2.-West-
ern Conference golfers will meet at
the Tam O'Shanter club, Chicago, June
9 and 10, Michigan authorities have
been informed.
The original date for the tournament
was June 10 and 11. By the change,,

f

31x4 Firestone ..............
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...... $15.30
. . . ....8.00
,. ...... 7.35
......... 17.55
... 14.20

the

TROJAN LAUNDRY

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