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June 02, 1927 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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STATE GAM LODGEIN BLACK HILLS OF SOUTH DAKOTA
WHICH COOLIDGE WILL MAKE A SUMMER WHITE HOUSE'
1EIghth Science Summer Sessio Under 1
University Direction Will Be .
- Held T In K lentuky 1

WILL LASTSIX WEEKS
Enrollment for the geography andj
geology fsummer d a m p conducted
every year by the University is ex-
pected to exceed that of previous sea-
sons, according to Prof. G. M. Ealers
director of the camp. This yeairmarks
the eighth session of the summer
camp, which is regarded as a prac-
tical opportunity for field research:
under natural geographic conditions..
To date 12 students have enrolled inI
the geography courses and 17 in thel
geology field courses offered by the
camp faculty staff, which also includes
Prof. I. D. Scott of the geology de-
partment sand Prof. Preston E. James
of the geography department.
Located at Mill Springs, ten miles]
from Burnside, the nearest point of
railway connection, the camp is sit-
uated in the heart of the upper Cum-
berlAnd valley region, and presents
unlimited opportunities for the study
of physigraphical and geological for-
iations through actual experience.
According to present plans, the
members of the party will visit one of
the largest coal mines in the moun-
tainous- part of the state before break-
ing up the session. After the camp is
officially closed on July 30, the? work,
of the students will consist in mak-
ing .a rapid reconaissance mapping
survey eastward across the Cumber-j
land plateau, the great valley of thel
eastern Tennessee river, the Great
Smoky mountai s, the Piedmont pla-
teau, and thwe tlantic Coastal plain..
During the latter part of the sum-
mer Professor James will continue his
land economic survey of the Black-
stone vallew near Worcester, Mass.,.
upon which he has spent the past,
few summers classifying and map-
ping lands and vegetation areas ac-
cording td their present and potential
arses.

COURT CO0NSIDA.,RS
SANITATION CASE
(Ily Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, June .-Litigation
arising from diversion of the waters'
of Lake Michigan by the Chicago San-
itary district proceeded here yester-
day in two directions.
While hearings were resumed before
Charles Evans Hughes, as a special
master in chancery, in the suit by the
states of Wisconsin, Ohio, and Penn-
sylvania, seeking to restrain this
water diversion, the Supreme court
granted Illinois a practical victory in
one angle of tht case.
It ordered that the state of New
York abandoned its contention that
diversion into the Illionis was affect-
ing the waters of'the Niagara and St.
Lawrence rivers. Illinois and the
sanitary district held that New York
had no right in these two rivers, in-
asmuch as they are boundary waters.
Before Aiir. Hughes, R. T. Jackson.
special assistant attorney general of
Wisconsin, representing the compain-
ants, opened formal oral argument.
and presented a brief 'containing 106
findings of fact: "He asked that the
defendants be ordered to 'cease "from
extractig any of the waters of the
St. Lawrence-Great Lakes systems
and be obliged to pay costs."

OUR TRU$T DEPARTMENT
IS READY TO $ERVE YOU.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
ANN ARBOR
OLDEST NATIONAL BANK IN MICHIGAN
I'mm

25c
1lac

Th~e ter

NOW $HOWING

This official lodge in Custer Park, 14 nIles from Rapid City, South D akota, in the Black Hills, has been
tentatively selected by the President as the location for the summer Whit e House, where he will spend his two
months' vacation.

DR. KRUYT TO BE PRINCIPAL SPEAKERI
AT FIFTH U. S. CHEMICAL SYMPOSIUM,
Dr. H. R. Kruyt, professor of physi- I tion to Dr. Kruyt's paper there will
cal chemistry at the University of be 23 others extending over the period
Utrecht, will be the principal speak- of three days. About 500 delegates
er at the fifth national colloid sym- from all parts of the United States
posium to be held in Ann Arbor June are expected. The members will come
22, 23, and 24. Dr. Kruyt gave a ser- from university faculties as well as
ies of three lectures here May 23 24, from business firms.
and 25 on "The Trend of Thought in Headquarters will be established
Modern Colloid Chemistry." i:e has
done much to put the science of col-
loids on a firm foundation.
The symposium is being held under >S4Wapie
the auspices of the colloid division of
the American Chemistry society. Dr. Under
Kruyt's paper will be entitled"Unity
j in the Theory of Colloids." In this
paper he will bring together the diver- en's No-iRi
gent views regarding colloid chem-Mo
stry. DrthCla eCkLittlewUnion S

at the.Union, and all meetings will be
h'eld in Natural Science auditorium.
Registration will be from 8 till 10:30
o'clock Wednesday, June 22, at the
Union. Last year the symposium was
held at the Massachussetts Institute
of Technology at Cambridge, and the
> year before at Minnesota.
Since his lectures here, Dr. Kruyt
has been attending meetings in var-
ious other cities. He attended the
regional meeting of the American
Chemistry society at Chicago and this

week is in Cleveland where a meet-
ing of the Chemistry Engineering so-
ciety is being held. After a visit to
several Canadian cities, he will re-
turn to Ann Arbor about June 12, and
remain here until the end of the Sum-
mier session. Dr. Kruyt, in conjunc-
tion with Dr. V. E. Bartell, will of-
fer several courses dealing with col-
loid chemistry this summer. Dr.
Bartell's courses will deal with the
fundamental principles of colloids.
such as surface chemistry, capillary,
and adsorption.
ANNOUNCE FINAL DISPLAY
An exhibition for the chemistry con-
vention which will be held in Ann Ar-
bor for a week starting June 20th
will be the 'last of the main library
displays for the year. It-will consist
mainly of books dealing with chem-
istry and its history.

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DIOUGLAS~
r'. .YURANK
114 THEt
PIRATE
This Picuetn IllI
{ Be Itere Two.
Today and
Tomorrow.

ce Athletic
Tear
Athletic
uits

COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN
eri ir the vicinity of State and Packard, will find the
PACKARD RESTAURANT, American cooking, a good place
to eat. Under new management, and everything else new.
703 PACKARD

'it

50c0
88CR
$1.15
i
C .rwu r. s

Photographed in Technicolor-A Most Gorgeous
and beautiful Effect

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Being the Love Story of TBold, BadlBuccaneer

Men's

Genuine B. V. D.
Union Suits

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4-PERFORMANCES DAILY-4

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316 South Main St.

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We're Not Saying a Word
But Our Local Critic
Seems to Have 'Consider-
able to Talk About. ~ -
RE AD- *
Clipping That I .tj
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Tin e d
inTMonday'she P eayrs
Times-News iar .aies, ial y, ,
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And Oayer Notables
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