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May 28, 1927 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATUIIDA i , MAY 28,

11 f - 00 -1

DEAN Of NEW SCHOOL
OF FORELSTRY ARRIVES
TO TAKE OVER DUTIES'

TH ICIA DIY AUDAMA_8

i

IS TIE FIRST SCHOOL OF
KIND ESTABLISIEID IN
UNITED STATES

ITS

DETAILS ARE INCOMPLETE
Wil lPlace School.On A Professional
Bipsis; Two Year Preparation
Will Be Required
Samuel T. Dana, who has recently
been appointed the Dean of the new
school of forestry and conservation,
arrived in Ann Arbor yesterday to
form plans for the organization of the
schol, the first of its kind to be es-
tablished in the United States.
The need for research in diseases of
trees and plants led to the establish-
ment of the new school. Mr. Dana,
the deap-elect, in an article in the
Alumnus, has outlined the hopes and
aims of the new school. As part of
the plans to place the school on a
strictly professional basis students
will be admitted only after two years
of collegiate preparation. Instruction
in the simpler sciences will be given
in the College of Literature, Sciences,
and the Arts; while courses in den-
drology will be given in the new
school.
Will Stress Graduate Work
The school hopes to contribute to
the management and conservation of
forests, Mr. Dana says in his article,
and will aim to cover the entire field
of forestry land management more
than is now possible. Graduate work
will be stressed in an effort to turn
out forestry leaders.
Details of the curriculum have not
been worked out yet, but it is planned
to arrange the courses so that two
years of professional work in the
school will lead to a bachelor's degree
and three years of professional work
to a master's degree. The aim', as
Mr. Dana states them, are: to handle
instruction, research an cooperation
in an effort to conserve the forests; '
to offer a sound education in forest
silvics; and to turn out trained men
of high quality who will be able to
take their places as leaders in ,the
development of forest land.
Is Experienced Wrkeer
Mr. Dana is a graduate of Bowdoin
College. He is a member of Phi Beta
Kappa and Sigma Xi. Shortly before
his graduation he entered the United
States Forestry Service, and for sev-
eral years was chief of the Office of
Silvics at Washington. During the
war he was a captain on the general
staff doing special work connected
with the lumber supply of the army.
He reentered the forestry service
after the war and was interested for
some time In research problems. In
1921 he was appointed as commission-
er of forestry to the state of Maine.
He was later persuaded to take up
research work again and was mode di-
rector of the Northeastern forest ex-
periment station at Amherst; Mass.
This is one of the 10 experimental
stations maintginpd in the United
States. Research in forestry problems
of the New England region is car-
ried on at the station. 'Important
among these are protection of forests
from fire, insects and disease, and ex-
periments in the adapability of trees
to the New England district.
The forestry school at Michigan was
first organized by the late Professor
Filbert Roth. He worked single hand-
ed for a time, but eventually the
school was developed althougf it has
been limited because bf being only
a department in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts. Prof.
Roth served as head of the school
from 1903 to 1923, after which fail-
ing health caused him to resign after
20 years of service. He was made a
professor-emeritus in 1923 by order of
the Board of Regents. Following Mr.
Roth's retirement President Burton
attempted to build Michigan forestry
on a new and stronger basis. The
untimely death of the president pre-
vented the maturing of these plans.
President Little realized the situation
and has attempted to change it. The
new school has now made it possible
for specialization in forestry.
DENVER - Students of the short

story class of the University of Den-
ver school of commerce have hold
over 300 manuscripts during the past
school year.
PROFITABLE SUMER WORK
With opportunity of getting
sound business and sales expe-
rience, is available with reliable
national manufacturing concern.
Liberal compensation. Write the
Fuller Brush Co., 411 Wood-
brook Bldg., 5059 Joy Road, De-
troit, or phone students Frans
,Kuensel, 6636, or Max Shadley,
8565.
ArT THE DETROIT THEATERS !
The Night Club Classic
"BROADWAY"
GARRICK-NOW
Eves. 0c-$2.50
- Wed. Mat. 5Oc41.5y0
Sait. 5k.$12.00

British Leaders May Change Places Again
As Fight Over Trade Union Bill Increases
I :
Prime Minister Stanley IBaldwi n, and Ramsey MacDonald, former
labor premier, may change places agaun. New British elections are fore-
cast because of the fight in Parliame nt over the Trade Union bill. Baldwin
h1as declared that the conservatives ask nothing better than an appeal to
the country on the issue, but the La bor party sees in this a chance to
Place MacDonald at the rejins of gavernment in England. Baldwin, in de-
bate, has saidl that the bill declares a general strike, that involuntary
political subscriptions are unjust, an d tpat party politics in the civil ser-
vice is improper.

BAT TERED REMNANTS OF STATUAR Y Jness in an age of efficiency lie heaped smiling ironically into a pit where
FILLh CEeL"" ' "andtheoervhas to guanrdone ran a Uivesity heatng lnes
FILL CELLAR OF UNIVERSITY HALL' himself against weltering in sentimen- Isaac" leans agaiiis the wall next

By John Cornell hardly he imaginedIndians, Civil
John Adams lying with his face in war soldiers, Greeks, biblical figures,
the dirt, the (lust covered feet of Ab- and colonials stand or lie side by side
raham Lincoln, headless children in -or more correctly what is left of
an attitude of play, sooty Indian lov- them, for few are complete. What is
ers minus arms, noseless scholars in more pathetic than that, ome ironic
bas relief, Greek wohien peering into! individual with a sense of the grot es-
a holier flue, a Civil war soldier que has placed a Greek head on an In-
leaning on the space where his gun dian body and a musket in the arms
once was-these are a few of the pa- of the Grecian "Victory". The effect
thetic figures of plaster and marble contemplated under the yellow light
stored beneath University hall, wait- from the single window is depressing
ing for someone to put them out of to say the least. Ieroic figures which
their misery. once graced th . walls of the old Uni-
Covered with dirt. bricks, newspa- versity library and University hall
pers, and soot, a stranger group could and which have lost their appropriat(-
Pet your -~ ~ ~-

t:lity and speculating on tIre futility to a colonial figure sitting on what
(6 things in general. is left of a cannon. Piled high against
There are about 30 figures in all. the wall are bas reliefs, marked by
including the fragments of complete nicks and grooves and scratches be-
figures which have been destroyed or yo:d easy recognition, symbolic of the
lie elsewhere. The plaster figures whole group of statuary gathering
which once graced the oflice of the dust and awaiting destruction.
_president show especially the marks"--__-
of time. Noseless and headless, two READ THE WANT ADS
figure, of a trio lie face downward,
L-
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Served in a
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ANN ARBOR RESTAURANT
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ARTISTS'
OIL COLORS
Canvas Boards
Artists' Brushes
Academy Boards
Artists' Canvas
Drawipg Inks
Enamellt

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BIGGER, AND BETTER
MENAGERIE
GREATLY IM PROVED
VASTLYDIFERENT
PERFORMANCEs 2&8AM.

This advertisement and 50c
will admit any student to the
matinee performance.
Regular price, 75c
ANN ARBOR
TUES AY
MAY
- South Packard St.
Show Grounds

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DEVOE
ARTISTS'
O11S and VARINISHES
Academic
Water Colors
Sehool Water Color Boxes
Show Card Colors
Pastel Boards

WENZEL'S
207 East Liberty ANN ARBOR

ENGRAVING and PRINTING II

WEDDING
INVITATIONS
ANNOUNCEMENTS"
and CARDS
should be ordered at once by

June brides.

Our connections

with the largest engraving
douses in the country assure

Hundreds of Styles
for Your Selection
10% discount on all cash
orders received before June
1. This offer is made to
avoid the last minute rush
and give you the best avail-
able sgrvice.
CALLING CARDS
Plate and 100 cards
$2.75 and Up.
Plate printing
$1.75 per hundred.
24-hour service on Printing
and Relief Printing orders.

CORNWELL COAL - COKE
Scranton, POcahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coal
Solvay and Gas Coke
This business has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret-
"giving absolute satisfaction to our
customers." We believe it pays to do
business in a friendly way. If you
think so too, let's get together.
CORNWELL COAL - COKE
OFFICE, CO1NWELL BLOCK
Phones, Office : 4551-4552 Yard Office: 5152

0

No more needs be said of Rusco Brake Lining. Ask the man
who has them -on his car. Our Laundry Service ranks 'us with the
best. Call us for appointments.
Jim's Brake Service and Auto Laundry!
4I7 EAST HURON ST. DIAL 9262
.,"...y."",.r. y. v. .+:!.~a ".!. 11. ",sl ~ "y J~'"V.O I"0"r~l1,: ", «/ . "1 1.. dI A

you of the

highest quality

workmanship and correctness
in every detail.
100 Sets
$14.50 UP

if

"

Y
r1.
,.... _ .

I

0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
The Stationery and Typewriter Store

MICHIGAN BE LL
TELEPHN O
Long Distance Keeps
All Branches In Close 'Iouch

7.

f

° ..

ROund Thoe World
In A -Collee Year!
FLOATING UNIVERSITY "AURANIA"
CO-EDUCATIONAL
0 PPORTUNITIES for special study and sight
seeing on shore in conjunctionwith
foreign.universities, governments and im-
portant institutions. Academic study while
at sea equal to work in an accredited univer-
sity ashore. Special emphasis on departments
of social sciences, political sciences, geogra-
phy, comparative religion, languages and art.
Executive head-Dr. Thomas W. Butcher,j
President of Faculty
Faculty of fifty from leading colleges and
universities of United States.
Careful supervision of students with home
atmospheres
Food and service of the well known Cunard
standard of excellence.
Sailing from New York September 21st, 1927 for
eight months visiting 26 foreign countries. Cost--
$2500 to $4150-fully inclusive. For full informa-

toCLAww..'-t

- --~wO ..

c
P_ s;

UVROM OFICE
;° 2tms, 1J2t,

Michigan Sell Telephone Coftpary,
1-65 Cass Avenue,
Detroit, Michigan,

. Attention: Mr.- -. L. Gilpin
Dear Wi. Gilpin-
We operate two complete factories. one in
Detroit and one in Chicago. We also have Branch Warehouos
facilities in Cleveland and rw Yare. City. The large
volume of correspondence between these points involves
our considerable use of the long distance telephono.
We would scarcely know how to operate without your
facilities. We encourage promt action by pgr'itting
our subordinates to -call -each other at will. The re-
sultant rapid turnover of inventory is alone worth
the telephone cost.
Our exclusive operating LicenseIn Can-
ada is in close touch with us byr telephone and within the
past few mnths,sino you changed your lower rates to
begin at 8:30 in-the even ng our time. I have talked
eve ralntimes. This serce has been surprisinglycearn )
,rompt and economical in every way.
in one of these conversations with our
Los Angeles connection, j young daughter taled to our
Ur. Rauen, just for tho experience. She bost expressed
my orn feelings - "Daddy its no different tan talking
right in Iowa

CARCELY any invention of
late years has given more
Summer comfort than the
Electric Fan, or is more in-
dispensable in the home.
The Electric Fan, by maintaining a
steady stream of fresh, cool air,
promotes both health and enjoyment.
Ip refreshing breezes arc produced
at a trifling cost-less than one-third
of a cent an hour.
This is the time to give the
matter your thought. Come in,
please, and look at our stcck.
0
04: V LI:

\

liesPeatf411-y Yours.
e eta
The C. G. SPRING aid BiJS4I'M Ccna'osny
(Delaware)
Fred A. Cornell.
DAW
F
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z

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Edison

Company

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