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May 25, 1927 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-25

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 25, 1927

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THEPMCHIGA DAIL

CARTE L SKS PRES
STAND ON THIRD
John Came',"Yale man and journ-
alist of wide experience, is the author
of an open letter to President Calvin
Coolidge which appears in the "Our
Rostrum" department of the June
number of The Forum'. The letter
questions President Coolidge upon his
attitude toward a third term and asks
that an open reply be given to those
who are interested in the presidential
election for 1928. Mr. Carter is a
writer and the author of "Man Is
War."
The letter is opened by a statement
of the facts which relate to the elec-
tion and President Coolidge's position
In regard to it. Mr. Carter asks
"May not the electorate expect an
equal grace from you (that, is, the
same as from Gov. Alfred E. Smith,
of New York) in the form of a state-
inent which neay clarify your personal
appraisal of your eligibility for the
Republican nomination in 1928?"
Mr. Carter then.states the objection
which is held toward the president's
nomination next year. "The obstacle
to such eligibility is single: it rests)
on the assumption that your re-elec-
tion would constitute a third term as
President. No constitutional prohi-
bition,,no statute, forbids your re-S
election; yet the record of 140 years'
of American government stands un-
broken-no president, no matter how
called to the Presidency, has held the,
office for more than eight years." He
also cites instances of attenpts in
the past for third terms, all of which
turned out unsuccessfully.
As a result of these, he questions,
the President: "Do you consider,
that this record by former leaders of
your party has any application to
your eligibility to the nomination it
will bonfer next year? Do you be-
lieve that the attitude of the Republi-f
can party has been adequately ex-
pressed in the Convention which de-I
feated Grant and nominated Garfield,
and that which ignored Roosevelt
and nominated Taft?. Do you believe

IDENT TO TAKE CIRCUS TO ARRIVE
TERM CANDIDACY: IN TOWN TUESDA Y
Aside from the usual attractions
that McKinley's declarations in 1901 vhhacru holds for people of allI
and Roosevelt's self-denying state- I
ments in 1904 represent Republican ages, John Robinson's Circus which is
doctrine or are applicable to you scheduled to appear in Ann ArborI
dotrine oraeapplthabletrdYou *ITuesday, May 31. 110(1d another in-1
Do you believe that the trafdition I tfrclc~ ~ ido ~i i

I

of American politics is hostile to a
substantive third term in the presi-
dency?"
Mr. Carter believes that: the tradi-?
tion which has surrounded the Presi-
dency has become inore than a tradi-
tion, it has become an unwritten law.
He addresses President Coolidge "As
a student of American history, no"
less than as a member of the Mas-
sachusetts bar, you fully appreciate:
the part which custom plays both in
our jurisprudence and our politi-;
cal life. In a democratic Republic!
such as ours, custom must inevitably
share the burden of governneit and
be the substitute for statute. It not
the 'wise custom' governing the of-
fective term of Presidential office an
integral part of the common law as
it affects our.Constitution?"
Mr. Carter says that the attitude
of silence which the President is, tak-
ing at the present time "both con-
fuses and embarrasses the Presiden-
tial aspirants within your (the Presi-
dent's) party." It gives them no
chance to go into their own campaign
as actively as they might with definite
information .on the stand of President
Coolidge, according to 'Mr. Carter.
Therefore he asks the President these
questions: "Do you feel that you
need not weigh against a personal
and partizan expediency the consid-
eration of political principle? Your
decision to conceal your Course con-
forms admirably to the requirements
of +personal and party strategy. Do
you believe that you are at liberty to
use a basic practice of American gov-
ernment as a vehicle for political
mechanics? Do you consider that
your silence in no way infringes the
dignity of the Presidential office?"
In closing his letter Mr. Carter
makes a final appeal. "Under the
practice of the Constitution, the elec-
torate will decide upon the issue.
Among them may be that of a third
term. The electorate is a great one,
as your own majority will testify,
and of complex conposition. Public
opinion is slow to form and, if un-
instructed, may not realize the issue
which it will determine by its action
at the polls. Do you feel that you
are under no obligation to enlighten
a friendly and sympathetic public in
such wise as to permit it to consider
the issues of 1928, cooly and in ad-
vance of the partizan turmoil of a
deliberately confusing campaign?
Will you accordthe electorate the
leisure to consider Whether it may1
be called upon to break with the tra-
dition of 140 years of the Presidential
office?"

t ua..a ..: t. ". a./A i+v a.tVb G' fJ 4tA.to C: 114i.J III Lllclu Lllt.:
t .. ... 1

manager, Sam . Dill is believed to
be t le only college man to head a cir-
cus in this country. Mr. Dill is a for-
mer student of the University of In-
diana having been in attendance at
the Law school there.
Robinson's Circus is one of thed old-
est in the United States, having been
in continuous existence for over 104I
years. There will be a special ticket
rate of 50 cents for the matinee. Tick-
ets for the show may be obtained at
the show grounds or at Dawson Broth-
ers' drug store.
CHICAGO-Twice as many men as
co-eds are put on, probation annual-
ly.

London Paper Opens;
New Tourist Bureau
LONDON, Eng., May 23.-"The Daily
Telegraph," a London newspaper, has
recently instituted a tourist bureau,
in order that American visitors may
see England and London in a better
way than by the usual haphazard
method. The bureau is based on the
idea that London's attractions, its life,
and its doings are best known to the
directors of a large metropolitan
newspaper.
The bureau is located in the world-
famous and central-Picadilly, and
here the visitor will find a large fund
of detailed information in timetables,
guides, and other tourist literature.
It is hoped that eventually the place
will become the central place of call
for all foreign visitors.
CORNELL - Organized rooting at
the baseball games has been banned.

ANNOUNCE DATE FOR SECOND ANNUAL FLOWER SHOW

Hius c lowiPr hcok has
life, SAltt !]AQrrent
and crxjlcsvaiey

An exultant spirit of
youth and fteedom

KS .Z1 'u -.. vaJs Ys tsintj L eLL1E
pages.
hove s in the Offin , --" -Chicago Post
ICHARD HALLIBURTON
writcs a new book - another- reckless,
gay, sppntaneous account of youth on a
holiday, rwngeach moment with life.
The Glorious Adventure
From abundanmt new experience
in the "otte of Ulysses
this irrepressible young man
to his scnsationa1 best seller,
QE
,a Royaii Road to omance
Ile,
)Eb .. Iwlusa ned. . -ohes rekDOBBs MERRILL
. e orou'dentures
monaudiC)nweprec
illth ioottc sof lyse

HOPE TO RECALL U, S,
FORCES IN. NICARAGUA
Stimson, Sent As American Arbitrator,
Reports Marines Must Remain
Until After Elections
IS AIDED BY REBEL ARMY
WASHINGTON, May 24. - C o 1.
Henry L. Stimson,' who was sent to
Nicaragua by President Coolidge to
bring about peace there, returned
and reported to the President that his
mission was so successful that it may
soon be possible to recall a large
number of American marines from
the army of occupation.
.He made it clear, however, that a
force of some proportions would have
to remain there indefinitely, certainly
u til after the elections of 1928, which
the United States has consented to
supervise. It was the promise to do
so, he said, which caused the revo-
lutionists to lay down their arms.
Until'he was able to establish peace
between the warring factions the
fighting had been extremely fierce and
casualties in proportions to the num-
ber engaged were as high as in the
World War, he declared.
Colonel Stimson said that General
Moncada, leader of the rebel or liberal
army, had helped restore peace in-
stead of obstructing it.
Place Fire Warnings
In University Woods
The Forestry department is placing
signs warning of fire danger in all
the woods under the supervision of
the University. The signs were au-
thorized by the Board of Regents to
warn against the careless disposal of
matches in the woods and of the dan-
gers of forest fires. The signs are
being put up by the foresters.
AT THE DETROIT THEATERS

NOW SHOWING
WUERTE

1'

s
-
_
.
... ,
; 1
r
__
__ __ _ fi

She believed that elope-
anent with a married man
would be a thrilling ad-
venture And-it was !-a
superb comedy packed
with laughs and excite-
ment.

III

I'

-j .

The Night Club Classic
"BROADWAY"
GARRICK-NOW
Eves. 50c-$2.50
Wed. Mat. 50c-$1.50
Sat. Mat. 50c-$2.00
Bonstelle Playhouse
1Woodwr,1 at Eliot
The
DONOVAN AFFAIR
The Biggest Mystery Hit in
Five Years
C A S H
FOR YOUR
OD SUITS

10HN G. S I NNJ PRE$WTS}
{0
*ri
J~eI~it "

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