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May 22, 1927 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-22

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THE MICHICAN DATI.Yf

OT A A? A V A '" "Cl 4 A affir

COMMWITTEE HEADED BY PROFSI
:111-DERSON GIVES1
REPORT
KEPPEL GIVES OPINION
Carnegie Report jPrepared By Experts I
Stimillates IneStigaltiont Of
.State Conditions

As a result of a report prepared
some tinme ago by the Carnegie cor-
poration, specific work has been un-
dertaken by the; University Senate re-
garding the fuxtherance of adult ed-
ucation in the state of Michigan. A
report relating to the exact conditionsj
in the state has been made up by a fac-
ulty committee appointed for the pur-
pose, headed by Prof. W. D. Hender-
~son of the Extension division. Thej
total findings of the committee were'
related at the last meeting of he Senl-
ae, and the motion made and carried
that the conmmitee be continued for
further investigation.
The Carnegie report was made more
than i. year ago by a corps of work-
ers who had been put in the field for
the express purpose of studying the
adult education all over the country.
Some of the more 'salient facts dis-
covered were (1) that there were five
times as many adults pursuing some
form of extramu~ral study as were
registered in all schools and colleges
combined; (2) that 90 per cent of this.
work had to do with vocational sub-
jects; and (3) that enormous sums of
money were paid out annually for
certain types= of adult education
courses, and that a great part of this
money was :being wasted as far as]
actual benefits received were con-'
cerned.
StJudy Is Of General Nature
Frederick W. Keppel, president of
the .Carnegie corporation, in a com-
ment uipon the report, said that such
a study as had been undertaken was
of a general nature only, and that
immense benefit might be derived"
fronm, separate studies carried on in
various parts of the country by. Ex-
tension departments and other organ-
ized bodies. He especially empha-
sized the importance of such a study
in a state si ilar to Michigan, where
t here are three geographical and four
economic sections.
The Senate committee was appoint-
ed by Presient Clarence Cook Little, j
and consisted of W. W. Bishop, lii-1
, rarian, Profs. J. W. Glover, T. W.
Rankin, and' Prof. I. L Sharfman, of

The development of commercial, in-
ED C TIONdustraa, d labor groups was founid
to be of comparatively recent elate-
T~to the increasing comnplexity and
11 Rom r% A% ecialization o prodluction and ad-
N iini't ra:tion needs. Foremost aui,{ng
I V OSIY ~ J[~Lebodies in :Michigan are thle Ford
- empoin ionof Flint, the Common-
the literary college. Prof. C. S. Berry llPwr opnyo acsn
of the School of Educat in, Pr'of' E. s:and(1!the Piston Ring company of Mu,.--
I). lDickinson, of the Law schroolj kegon, excluding several others of
Prof. A. I;. Whit'e, of the enrgir jeerintg equal rating. In particular the FordI
collae, D. S. ari~un ofthe rade school and technology instituter
Meia cllel, '.AnS. PrtfhiW. of he dhave worked out syst*,ns Xwher'eby the
Mers icaloschooltni Pof. c .i)i. i n d-studlent. is paid at the regular wage
rIhCobjects set forth lby this cony-whlheilarngTesopmt
fl ;ite for its study were ( 1) to de- j elspoue yteesuet r
termne wat aencis ar 1'in turn surtrcienrt to complensate the
termne hat genies 1'no1w i1 t he IFordI con,-p.'ary for tte expense in-
fieldl of adult education in the state; ovdi cnutn tewrkad
(2) to inrvestigate the ,cope oaiel char- I velesultcoucisngsyteorkdult C
acter of their work; (3) to find out t~rsl sa ytmo dl cu
cation which is stricly self-support-
what need there was for enlarging thein
extesio sevic inregad t t is ng.Summrarized, the total number
extnsin srvie i reardto hisof rdults benefitinig from t hese organ-
l~rl~cnI; n~l(~ ) o etemie Ilh iz iat ions amounts to more than 8,000c
sporxsibilities of Ith( 1 .1 ~siy in reII ts.
g ard to this matter. u
"D~efine Adidt Edujcajinrl',1 i s ssume 1Proinence
mhe coflca ittee especially noted the
In defining the terma'"adult edurca- ; ' nr~dexrcy in late years for libraries to
tion" in his report, .Presidlent Kejap elassume a considerable interest in the
said that it included all the supriple- encouragement of adult education,
mentary work that was b~eing done id cited the instance of the special
by a large group in addition to itsr nat ionai commission which was a p-
regular vocational activities. Th'is( pointed to work out the problem. MNr.
wa taken to include b)th cultural Bishop, of the University library, was'
and vocational types of study, and was, a mnemrber of this comimission.
so adopted b~y the comirxittee. t was noted thatt exceptional co-op.-
Three plans of p~rocedure were; eration had been mianifested on the
worked out by the comeIvittee in go- 1lpart of libraries in he different parts
ing about its work. The first was a° of thra state to supply books for the. I
study of the edlucational activities as
classified under formal, semi- formal,
and informal studies; the second a- AM 1-T1,A1T TG
classification accordling to vocational,I AnU
informational, and cultural studies; C LEA .NING
and1 the third a study in the 1terms of!..O K
the agencies through whichI the work( There are only a few in the
isbeing carried onl, such as literary' jUit ed States like this high
and civic organizations, library ac-,I grade works, and none other
tivities, and night schools. near you.
Under the first procedure it was dis- Oriental Rugs washed
covered that more than 180,000 adults by Experts.
are enrolled and are benefiting cdu-I Original colors are restored.
cationally from such educational, so-j Pure Soaps - Rugs Repaired
cial and religious groupls as Parent- Reference:
Teacher -organizations, Woilzen's clubs, Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Young Mfen's Christian associations, or your neighbor.
andl similar groups. Da 15 i3-4 re I

I.

extension courses wvhich were sentS that more than 15 per cent of thee OR N SU CED<'orHans!o eig"Drayai:"W
out by the University. This problem students w~ere college graduae..aegigrgtaed peigu n
had been considered one of the uit- mote Ll jiroveijient 1)esire f
most__importamce, ithout any noisC.
motipracand it is hoped that 1The desire norN;sithout anyenoist
other libraries will respond in this, dsr fo
repc:upon the part of the adlults of the ~ '' sucatdPr s RCKF LLI INTItTTE- Sei-
resec. AS'IIGTN, May 21---Roy A. e ntist, will take photographls of thle
Among the more strictly ediucational state is evident, according to the corn- fansi u ftegvrmn e-jhat fmni h lcrccart
n~~e rmtefc ht1900au t t * i,(lto h oenmn e, , rso" et nteEI(i11 hl't
groups, the night schools figured' vitteandrotlthelfticshaof1p9ohibitiilt { I- lan their heart re acti.ons when the
most, with more than 47,000 in this 1in Michigan pay annual fees of more nii1')n'i hve been taken over by (tileilt str'ike hem.1'11
state taking advantage of tihe oppor- than $2,000,000. Dr. ,}am:,-,M.T, oran, aplpointed to
tuiit. As compared to this, the total numz1-t tint Il stryest c-riliy by Secret ary Mel- Patronize Daily Advertisers~~
her enrolled in the var ious extei in lonm.
The moststrln facts discover-1
ed y heCaneie ndSeat cm-courses offered (lby state instituitions Dornan. who has beemi iihead of the
is only 11neie,000enae.cm-p 7; hibit ion bureau's technicail division, RING
ni ttees dealt with tihe correspondence Aitecls oherpot tecon- sitin -(11charge of the ( nfrceinenit 2i% o A)%lfseu
schbools, which are operated with the mittee cited cases of aipplication from! ac tivihes today, supplantting Ilay~nes m1i R i)I'llTERSO' & ('0.
end in view of returning dividends tor outside thle Unix-ers;h y for r1econtuend- I wol, hadiben serving as acting c~om- ~I ut UieitatFrs
their stockholders. Modern sales- ations as to reading. anil courses ofiI niissio ter. I ___________________________
mlanship met hods are used by these study to follow oat, and poinfted out l Decla rng that it 'wasa not necessary___________________________
~Instittitons to secure students, with that the combinaion of such willing-
more than $70,000,000 is paid annu- ness on the part of indiviluais a1ndl
al y i u t o o t e e a e c e . T e ic r o a i n o s e p c a u ii:I.comnm ittee found that, w hile in som e ;nient, w ith the disclosure of condhli ion .,
case's highI-graide instruction was of- (I surround~inlg the present fac lities ,, foi , w
fered, from 80 to 90 per cent of the adult edulcation, wvouldl seem to oval-:
studnts ho eterd th cousesrant furlther study on the part; of t}1e
drioplped before their completion, for- University ill regard to ext eus :cou
felting their fees. This was thought courses by correspondence. FPr C )g YO. ,EJI1NAL. ARD N
to be due to the usual unpreparedness that this task was beyond thbe cop a tine of Relicfagr if cards made by a process
foin handlling, the work. In the high of the r 'eport sub~mitted, it was- n lmn thIle engraved plate. L-aooksthew same as
rate of mortality and, the forfeiture commnendedl that the comnmit tee be eoil'i av iug a"nn cos>tsli:uciless.arder yusnw
Of the fees lies the profit of the bus-i- tinned wvith instructions; to report to. 11lii aiiih l 1k('s11Y Fitoje .1711
ness. Another fact brought out was the Senate at some future date.

TI - 4r'1\j C VT - 1 NT I V ~~ ~ L~q .L .A..J A SUAUAY MAY 22' 1927'l

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