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May 22, 1927 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-22

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ESTABLISHED;
180

<Y

Sir

Liii

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXVII. No. 169 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARDOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 22, 1927 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

LINOBEROH

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.
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NEW

YRK -PAIS

FLIGCHT

WOLVERINES WIN OVER BUCKEYE,
OVgCER,0-6 OME WISCONSIN TEAM, EC 4-1

MICHIGAN WEEKLY P I
IS APPROVED BY USiL RALfIIO OR
COLLEGE__EDITORS! ITAIAISOS

TRACK TI AM COMES NEARER
ANOTHER CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIP

MILLER OUTPITCHES STOLL
WIN THRILLING TWELVE
INNING BATTLE

TO

FIVE RECORDS BROKEN RECORD CROWDS ATTEND

Eleven 'Jut Of Possible Fifteen First
Places Won In Worst Defeat
Given In Four Years,
(Special to The Daily)
COLUMBUS, 0., May 21.-Winning
eleven out of a possible fifteen first
places, Michigan's track tean advanc-
ed another step toward the fourth
Western Conference championship in
the last five years. In defeating the
Buckeyes by the overwhelming mar-
gin of 89 paints to 46 garnered by O.
S. U., Michigan administered thef
worst defeat that an Ohio State track
team has suffered since the famous
Michigan 1923 outfit, National Cle
giate champions, walked away on the
long end of a 100 1-2 to 34 1-2 score.
Times and distances in almost all'
events were alnost uniformly good,
two dual meet records and three Ohio
Field marks falling ,by the wayside.
"Jack" Schravesand, of Michigan,
throwing the discus 144 feet 11 1-2 in-
ches, smashed three records, includ-
ing the dual meet mark of 137 feet 71
inches and the Michigan record of 143!
feet 9 inches, both made by "Dick"

Michigan Takes Advantage Of Bunched I
Hits And Error To Score Three
Runs In Twelfth
By Dan Albrecht
Sports Editor Wisconsin Daly 1
Cardinal
MADISON, May 21 -Michigan's.
great baseball team climbed another
long hill in its rush toward the cham-
pionship on Randall Field here today,
defeating Wisconsin after a desperate
twelve inning struggle, 4-1. .
A three run rally, the Wolverines
favorite game winning trick, once
again provided the knock-out punch.
Don Miller, Michigan hurler who the
Badgers pounded frequently at irreg-
ular intervals during the afternoon,
boosted his team onto the band wagon
with' a fluke single to open the twelfth.
Neblung laid down a neat bunt and
was safe at first on an error by
Murphy, Wisconsin first baseman.
Weintraub was thrown out at first,j
his mates advancing. Morse, Michigan!
shortstop who hadn't done better than1
a pop fly in four previous innings up,
smashed a hard drive through the box,j
and Miller raced home with the win-
ning run, closely followed by Neblung.

Editors of several of the larger col-
lege publications and literary maga-
zines, including the New Student,
have expressed their approval of the
Michigan Weekly,' an introductory i -!
sue of which was published a short1
time ago, in letters to the editors ofi
this newest publication of the Mich-
igan campus. The idea of a paper
printed in the interests of the parents
of students on the campus, and for
all those who are closely attached to
the University through some associa-
tion, was received favorably by these
editors, who considered that it was!
designed to appeal to readers not
reached by other regular college pub-
lications.
In each of the issues special atten-
tion will be given to news that is rep-
resentative of the campus, and the
paper, will include an account of
everything that occurs at the Univer-
( city, especially effecting a major
1 group of the student body' or their
relationships to the school, so that a
reader of The Michigan Weekly will
be enabled to be familiar with all
that occurs here, whether it be the
regular events and traditions, or
special happenings which make eachf
college year distinctive.I
Numbers of orders have been re-1
ceived already at the office of The'
Michigan Weekly in the Press build-
ing, according to George H. Annable,
Jr., business manager, and the office
will continue to remain open for sub-
} scriptions until the close of the sem-1
ester. An order now, at $1.25, will
insure delivery with the first issue in
! the fall and regularly throughout the
year.
'FESTIVAL IS BROUGHTi
TO SUCCESSFUL CLOSEI
Nationally Famous Artists Attract
Large Numbers Of Out Of Town
People To All Programs
'CARMEN' CLOSES PROGRAM
Bizet's "Carmen," sung by Sophi
Braslau, Lawrence Tibbet, Armand1
Tokatyan, James Wolfe, and Lois
Johnston, and an afternoon concert
by the Chicago Symphony orchestra
with Ernest Hutcheson as solo artist,
closed the thirty-fourth May Festival)
yesterday, after four days of perform-
ances.
Large numbers of people from out
of town, and full houses for a major-
ity of the concerts were reported by
officials. Standing room was sold for
the Friday performances, which fea-
tured Rosa Ponselle, of the Metropol-
itan Opera company.
Last night's rendition of "Carmen,"
although slightly cut,- gave an oppor-
tunity for the audience to hear the

BUILDING APPROVED

hOPE TO MAKE FINAL PLAYS
AND TO BREAK GROUNI)
IN TWO MONTHS
TO BE ONFERRY FIELD
Saginaw Firm Awarded Aain Contract
I For Erection of Building
For College Women
General plans for an intramural
sports building were approved by the
Board in Control of Athletics yester-
day afternoon, and it is hoped that
ground will be broken for the new
structure soon after July 1. The Board
also awarded the contract for the new
women's building.
"It will probably take five weeks or
so to take care, of drawing up final
plans and specifications incident to re-
ceiving bids and awarding the con-
tract," Coach Yost stated after the
meeting yesterday. The final contracts
will probably be awarded on or before
July 1, and work will begin immediate-
ly afterward.
To Be Erected On Ferry Field
The building is to be erected on the
site of the present north football
stands on Ferry field and will cost in
the neighborhood of $650,000. When
completed it will be nearly as large .as
Yost field house. Present plans call
for a building which will be slightly
narrower than the .field house and
several feet longer. The new field
house will be used almost entirely for
intramural sports, swimming and
wrestling being the only Varsity sports.
which will be housed in it with the
exception of indoor tennis. Although
the intramural department will have!
the, new building as a further place
to broaden the scope of its activities.

FORENSIC AWARDS
TO BE PRESENTED
AT SPRING DINNER
Awards to all those who have won
honors in public speaking and for
ensic contests during the last year, to-
gether with the installation of the new
cfficers for the Oratorical association
elected at the spring elections, will
take place at a banquet to be given
Tuesday night in the Union by the i
Oratorical association.!
Medals for all members of the var-
sity debate teams and awards forI
those who have won places in other
forensic contests held this year will
be presented by Prof. R. D. T. Holli-
ster of the public speaking depart-
ment. Several other members of the1
faculty of the public speaking depart-
ment will give short talks.
Following tire program, Robert S.
Miller, '28, will be installed as the new
president of the Oratorical association
for the school year 1927-28. He suc-
ceeds Jerome Mikesell, '27L, who has
held the post during the year just
closed.
Other officers of the Association will
also be installed at this time, includ-
ing the new vice president, treasurer,
and secretary. The banquet will be
complimentary to those who have dis-
tinguished themselves in work in
public speaking this year.
LANTERN NIGHT TO BE
CELEBRATED TUESDAY'
Freshman Pagent Portraying Mythical
Race Of Atlanta To Be Followed
By Traditional Parade
SUPPER WILL BE SERVED
All women of the University will
gather at Palmer Field Tuesday night
in observance of the traditional Lan-
tern Night ceremonies held annually
to signify the advancing of the
classes. In conjunction with the

Thousands Surround Lindbergh's Plane
And Cheer As He Lands At
Le Bourget Field
1PARIS, \lav 21.-apt. Charles A. Lindbergh, the yoting Ameri-
can aviator, who' hopped off froml New York yesterdaymrnga
Ialone in his monoplane, arrived in P aris tonight, ssafe and soundI, as
i everyone oed he would
'The san dy-haired son of the Middle West drop~pedl down out of
the dlarkness at Lec Bourget flying field a few miles fromn Paris, at 10:2I
o'clock tonight, 5:21 p. mi., New York time, only 33 1-2 hours after
leaving Long Island-the first man in history to go from New York
to Paris without changing his seat.
T[o the young American it was seemingly merely the achievement
of an ambition. To IParis, to France, +o A\m.erica, to the world, his
- - landing tonight made him the greatest
1 of he roes mankind has produced sinco
uC~eeds ixeCOru th ir became a means of travel.
n A crowd of at least 25,000 sur-
rassage Over UCean rounded his plane, the "Spirit of St.
Louis," when it came to earth, after
its epochal voyage from the new
Iev.eedhew . world to the old. The airman was

Doyle, last year's Conference cham- Just to make it the usual three, Puck-
pion. elwartz drove in Morse with another
Don Cooper, Michigan's premier clean single to center.
hurdler, meeting with Larry Irwin, of Tied After Second Inning
Ohio State for the second tine this Throughout the battle, which was
season, repeated his recent victory in: tied at 1-1 from the second inning on,
the high hurdles. Irwin, however, led, the Wolverines- threatened time and
the Michigan timber topper to the tape again to break away, but on every oc-
in the low barriers, but was forced to' casion the superb hurling of Capt.
set a new dual meet record of 23.7 George Stoll, Wisconsin and perfect
seconds in order to do so. The former i Badger fielding smothered what seem-
reord was 24 'seconds flat. made by-------------------------------si.

McCreery of Ohio State, in 1922, and;
tied since by "Phin" Guthrie, of Ohio
State in the two previous meets. This
mark also set a new Ohio field record.
Although in running a dead heat,
Wyckoff and Loomis, two Ohio Statei
milers, ran the fastest mile ever run'
in the Ohio Stadium, 4 minutes 24.6
seconds, they came a full second from
the dual meet record made by Ar-1
nold, of Ohio State at Ferry field twol
years ago.
Captain Phil Northrop, competing in
his last dual meet appearance for
'Michigan, jumped 24 feet 3-4 inches,
a full six inches fUrther than he has
ever done before. In addition, the
Michigan captain placed second in the
high jump and pole vault.
Summaury
100-yard dash. Won by Hester,
Mich.; Kriss, 0. S. U. second; Lasser,
Mich., third. Time: 10 seconds.
Pole vault. Won1by Prout, Micp.;
Northrup, Mich., second; Brown, O. S.
U., third. Height: 12 feet, 7 inches.
Shot put. Won by Lovette, Mich.;
T-ritten, O. S. U., second; Norton,
Mich., third. Distance, 44 feet, 6 in-
cles.
High jump. Won by Waldo, Mich.;
Northrop, Mich., second; Lea, 0. S. U.,
third. Height: 5 feet, 8 inches'
Mile run. Won by Wyckoff, and Loo-
mis, both of 0. S. U., tied; Monroe,
Mich., third. Time: 4 minutes, 24.6.
Discus throw. Won by Sch'ravesand,
Mich.; Rasmus, O. S'. U., second; Lo-
vette, Mich., third. Distance 144 feet,
11 1-2 inches.
220-yard dash. Won by Kriss, O. S.
U.; Hester, Mich., second; Lasser,
Mich., third. Time: 21.7 seconds.
Broad jump. Won by Northup, Mich.;
Dahlem, Mich., second; Crooks, 0. S.
U., third. Distance, 24 feet, 3-4 inches.
Hammer throw. Won by McCaffree,
Mich.; Ketz, Mich., second; Campbell,
Mich., third. Distance, 136 feet.
120-yard high hurdles. Won by
Cooper, Mich.; Irwin, 0. S. U., second;
Crooks, O. S. U., third. Time, 15.4 sec-
onds.
Javelin throw. Won by Lovette,
Mich.; Dahm, 0. S. U., second; Ketz,
Mich., third. Distance, 184 feet, 9 in-
clhes.
440-yard dash. Won by Ohlheiser;
Mich.; Munger, Mich., second; Bevan,
O. S. U., third. Time: 50 seconds.
Two mile run. Won by Hornberger
Mich.; Kennedy, 0. S. U., second;

ea like a certain score. in the eightn,
Michigan had three men on bases with
one out and the heavy end of the bat-
ting order un, Weintraub popped to
third base and Morse flew out to cen-
ter field.J The chance was. gone.
Wisconsin too, made several good
starts and might easily have won the
game in nine innings, but the Michigan
fielders made few mistakes. In the
sixth Rollie Barnum, Wisconsin catch-
er, was out by inches at the home

t
i
i
I
i
t
1
r
i
t
1
,<
,f
,

plate after a perfect relay
hit to right field.
Box score:
Michlgan AB R
Neiblung, rf ........6 1
Weintraub, 3b ......5 0
Morse, ss .........6 1
Corriden, if .......5 1
Puckelwartz, cf .....6 0
Kubicek, 2b ........ 5 0
Oosterbaan, lb.....5 0
Davis, c...........4 0
Miller, p..........5 1
Totals..........47 4

of his longj

H O
1 1
0 3
1 0
0 4
2 3
1 4
2 16
0 4
2 0
9 36
H O
0 3
0 3
1 3
1 3
0 2
1 7
1 3
2 12
2 0

A
0
3
2
0
0
4
0
1
3
13
A
2
3
0
0
3
1
0
0
2

E
0
1
0
n

Wisconsin AB
Donagan, 3b ........4
Decker ss ..........5
Burbridge, rf ........5
Larson, cf..........5
Massey, 2b ..........5
Barnum, c ..........5
Mansfield, if ........5
Murphy, lb..........5
Stoll, p............4

R
"1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
1
0
0
2
2
E
0
0
0
0
0
0 ii
2
0

the department will probably retain event, which is planned to be more
its office in Waterman gymnasium, elaborate than any in previous years,
To Cost $140,000 a picnic supper at 5 o'clock will be
Spence Brothers of Saginaw, the attended by groups from dormitories,
firm in charge of the construction of 4 sororities and league houses.
the* new museum, was awarded the Following the supper, the Fresh-
mmain contract for the erection of the lian Pageant will be presented at
new women's building on Palmer field. 6:30 portraying the mythical race of
the fleet-footed maiden, Atlanta, , of
The entire contract calls for an ex-
penditure of $140,000 on this building. ancient Greece: Orchesis, dancing so-
This sum is exclusive of the cost of ciety will present a program of di-
$1h30,000 for the land and grading vertisements, each of which will illus-
which is now being done. These con- trate an artistic dance interpretation,
tracts were awarded by the Board the purpose of which is the stimula-
tratse e awardtion of interest in classical dancing.
Among the facilities which will be The dance numbers, which will be
Aroddng theacinites whichswillingsubstituted for the usual class stunts,
provided in the new sports building have been arranged by Janet M. Cum-
are several tennis, basketball, and mi gs of the physical education .
hand ball courts in addition to a large pmn t
swimming pool. A place will be pro- antern Night ceremonies will fl-
vided for indoor golf practice and also| atr ih eeoiswl o-
for wrestling matches. low as the main event of the evening,
when the senior women, garbed in
their caps and gowns, hand their
LIBERAL CABINET lighted lanterns down to the junior
AND PARTY HEAD womei who in turn pass on their gaily
l colored flowered hoops to the sopho-
LEA VE NICARAGUA mores. Each class will form a line
ffour abreast, the senior women form-
(By Associated Press) ing next to the gate on the hospital
MANAGUA, Nicaragua, May 22-Dr.I side of Observatory street, with the
Juan Sacasa, head of the liberal re- sophomores following in the march
gime which opposes the conservative down to the center of Palmer Fed
government under General Adolfo where they will form a block
Diaz, left Puerto Cabezas in a sloop Mving picturesenitms eh
yestrda,' ccopanid b hi enireI will be taken by representatives of the
yesterday, accompanied by his entire' Re- o a opay tws n.
cabinet, it was learned today. Reo Motor Car company, it was.- an-
The sloop, the Wawa, is reported ounced yesterday. Music for the
to have touched at Port Linon,s o traditional event will be furnished by
duras, at 6 o'clock last night, and to Prthe Varsity band.
have p roceedled on to the north. Dr. 1 Programs for both Lantern Night
SSacasa'srdestination is said to be . and Freshman Pageant, having as a
Guatemala City. s cover design the winning posters of
Gr.eanacasafomethe recent pageant poster contest,
Dr. Jean Sacasa, formerly vice pres- will be distributed to spectators oc-
ident of Nicaragua, established a lib- cupying tie bleachers facing the
eral government at Puerto Cabezas fieldhi

Totals .

.43 1 83611 21

Stolen bases-Puckelwartz, Neblung,
Morse. Sacrifice hits-Decker, Murphy,
Donagan. Struck out, By Miller 4, By
Stoll 4. Bases on balls, off Stoll 5,
off Millerl. Passed ball, Miller.
Holland Professor
To Deliver Series
Of Addresses Here
Dr. H. R. Kruyt, professor of physi-
cal chenistry at the University of Ut-
recht, Holland, will give a series of
lectures next week on the general top-
ic of "The Trend of Thought in Mod-
ren Colloid Chemistry." The three
lectures will be given on Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday, May 23, 24,
and 25 at 4:15 in the Chemistry am-
phitheatre.I
The leeture on Monday will tealI

I Review of the May Festival
concerts of yesterday afternoon
aid evening will.be found in the
'Music and Drama column on
page 4.
majority of the famous arias sung in
concert by prominent operatic artists,
accompanied by the Chicago Sym-
phony orchestra, which was making
its 119th appearance on an Ann Ar-
bor stage.
Several of the artists were heard
during the festival for the first time,
including Lea Luboshutz, Ernest Hut-
cheson, and Elsie Baker, while Rosa
Ponselle, Lawrence Tibbet, Arthur
Hackett, and James Wolfe had ap-
pared before, and Mme. Schumann-
Heink was singing here for thel
eighth time. Her performance was
notable as a part of her final tour
of the United States, and probably her
last appearance here.
Two works were given at the Fes-
tival with their composers conduct-
ing. Howard Hanson directed the
premiere of his "Heroic Elegy," writ-
ten at the commission of the Beetho-
ven Centenary committee as a mem-
orial to the great composer, which
was heard at the memorial concert
Thursday night. Felix Borowski con-
ducted at the performance of his over-
ture "Youth," one of the prize com-
positions of the Chicago North Shore
Festival of 1923.
DISTRIBUTION OF
I 'ENSIANSGOES ON

Capt Charles A. Lindbergh '
Wlio yesterday completed a non-stopv
flight across the Atlantic, flying fromc
New York to Paris. This is a featN
that has lnever before been achievedi
by man. Capt. Lindbergh arrived in"
Paris at 10 :21, Paris time, consider-
ably ahead of his schedule.t
Flood Waters Cover
Western Section Of
State Of Louisianar
(By Associated Press)t
NEW ORLEANS, May 21-The rest-
less gurgle of muddy water echoed
from the northern boundary of Louis-,
iana to within 50 miles of the Gulf of+
Mexico, after having cut a path 150
miles long and 30 miles wide across
the state.
One-seventh of the total area of the
state was under water and the flood
was threatening weak points along the
Atchafalaya, 140 miles west of New,
Orleans, with a total acreage amount-
ing to almost half as much as already
has felt the weight of the waters.
A stubborn fight was maintained at
McCrea, on the Atclhafalaya, where the
current was ripping enbankments to
pieces. More than 2000 workers were
fightingin the mul and rain to hold
the flood waters off the sugar planta-1
tions off Pointe Coupee, Assumption,
Iberville, West Baton Rouge, and Ter-
re Bonne parishes. ,
With the situation critical along the
levee line the evacuation of the Evan-
geline country proceeded rapidly. The
population of the concentration camp
at Lafayette has sprung to 10,000 pass-
ing the total number of inhabitants of

ifted from the seat, where for two
lays and a night he sat fixed, guiding
is plane over land and sea, and for
10 minutes he was hardly able to
walk or do anything else, except let
imself be carried along by a mass
>f men made delirious with joy at his
chievement.
Received Notable Ovation
Never has an aviator of any nation,
yen king or ruler, had a greater or
nore spontaneous welcome from the
earts of the common' people of
France. The very recklessness of his
ndeavor, as it appeared, appealed to
the quick, emotional imagination of
Frenchmen, and they were quick to
respond with everything their hearts
could give.
All ties of Nationalism were for-
gotten by the Le Bourget throng.
They saw Lindbergh only a man who
had brilliantly gambled with death,
and won. There was regret, of
course, for Nungesser and Coli, and
regret, too, that the daring French-
men had not been the first. But there
was no bitterness in their greeting
of the American winner.
It was the common people of France
who first hailed the intrepid Lina-
bergh, as he emerged from what he
had called yesterday morning his
"death chamber." Shortly after 10:10,
the roar of his motor, for which they
had been waiting for hours, came
through the clear night skies to the
ears of the multitude. Plice lines
were swept aside as thousands surged
over the field to welcome the man
who had won their hearts and earned
immortal fame.
Crowd Races To Greet Him
"There he is," the cry went up as
the rays of the searchlight gleamed
u p on the monoplane, gracefully
descendingfrom the darkness which
had enveloped all and through which
only the sound of his motor gave
warning of his approach. At this in-
stant the crowd began their race
across the field.
Smoothly the airplane, the "Spirit
of St. Louis" glided down upon the
lighted ground. Even before it had
come to pause, a hundred hands
caught hold of the wings, and scores
of feet were trampling upon one an-
other in an effort to reach the side
of the fuselage, within which sat a
young man who all alone had suc-
ceeded in flying from New York to
Paris.
The wheels had scarcely ceased to
roll, the propeller had barely come to
a stop, when Lindbergh, weary eyed
but smiling, got up from the seat
where he had sat so long, and in a
casual voice, almost drowned by the
cheers of thousands, said with charm-
ing simplicity: "Well, here we are."
Crowds Carry Him
He put his leg over the side of the
cockpit and it was grasped by a hun-
dred hands. So was his other leg as
son as he could get it out of the ma-
cine. B-olding him high and cheering
him, with cheers that camne from the
heart, as well as the lungs, the crowd
took him to itself.
The police did their best to get
the young hero and save him from
those to whom he had become a
friend and hero, a sportsman to ad-
mire forever, but they were helpless
against the common impulse Ignor-

i
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I

last December in opposition to the
conservative government at Managua
over which Adolfo Diaz presided.
Sacasa's government was recognized
by Mexico but not by the United States
which already had recognized the
Diaz regime.
The liberal forces opened a cam-
paign on the conservatives and spor-
adic fighting continued for several!
months, dying out only recently with
arrangement of a peace agreement by
Henry L. Stimson, personal represen-
tative of President Coolidge.
Dr. Sacasa's departure follows
closely on the going into effect of'
these terms, which included retention
of President Diaz in office, super-
vising the elections in 1928 and dis-
arming both the conservatives and
Iliherl forces.

OHIO WESLYAN--The honor sys-
tem has been modified to provide for
the presence of instructors during
written examinations in certain emer-
gency cases.

BIG TEN STANDINGS

W.

- 1""

Illionis.........7
MICHIGAN.......6
Minnesota .......2
Iowa .............4
Purdue..........5
Northwestern .....5
Ohio State .......5
Wisconsin ........3
Indiana ..........2

I,.
3
3
1
3
4
4
9J
3
6

Pet.
.700
.667
.667
.571
.555
.555
.500
.500
.250

i

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