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May 13, 1927 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

: _..<,w.

mill

AS1tE M [3 Minneapolis Professor Claims Women IS SOCIETY HEAD
-Are Over-Rated In Scholastic Ability FOR COMING YEAR

REULTS Or LECTION College women are grtly ove-tkthe lead in industry, swbolastic
rated in regard tp their scholastic zeal, dependability, and capacity for
ability, according to the thiecry of. college work.
Phyllis Lolhton, Margaret Jawkis Professor Donald G. Patterson, and Professors Cnmpbeil, Davis, Delj
EdwJ ~Hegadone Fill Othec- T. A. Langlie, instructor, of the Uni- Toro, and Shull of the University oft
Positions In Club. versity of Minnesota, who go on to Michigan say that on the average ihey
-say that their apuarent superiority is 1Awomens' marks are much higher,
TO HtOLD TRV=OUTS SOON due to an inefficient marking systemthough in research work the ability
and that they are not really smarter of men is greater. They hold that the
Mary, White '29 was elected presi- than men. They contend that objective women are more industrious, more
dent of Masques dramatic society for measurements of achievem ents would conscientious, and that they take their l
women at a meeting held, Tuesday, prevent in part such over-rating of work more seriously. Tiese are allf
May 10. Ot1r officers for the ensuing women. great factors, they believe, andE
year wet coseii as follows: vice- On' a basis of data obtained fromi through the display of these traits
ya werghto, '28;lsee-the high schools of Minneapolis and their better grades are deserved. Thist
residentMrgrhllisSt. Paul, they assert that irrelevant is not due to an inefficient marking
treasurer, Edwina Hogadone '28. factors enter intp the old-style me- system. In some branches of study
Masques has enloyed a successful thod of awarding marks arbitrarily. the women excell, and since their en-
season this year and is making more Theteachers in' the sioolwere trance in professional lines has been
tasked to rate thle ability of their pu- but recent, they cannot be comnparedi
extensive plans for next. Their pro- pils. The girls on the average oh- with the men in their aptitude for
gram will include one large play for talied higher marks than the boys learning in those schools. Though men
women, to be given in the fall, corres-
ong to Sister Beatrice" aof ths- because they were more successful may make the best students the ma-
ponding to an"Sisther Btrioe" of is in impressing their teachers as being jority has not earned that reputa-
seas~on,' h Mines-Masques more enthusistic, more conscientious tion as yet.
production to be given in the spring. in getting work done promptly, and - -
First among the activities to be car- ,mre Industrious. The professors English
ried on under the new regime will be maintain that since the display of rit t Women are demanding the
thle annual spring try-outs which will ___s____s__________earg_ _th ge of 21,
be held from 4 to 5 o'clock, Wednes- these traits does not lend to greater
day, May 18, at Newberry Hall. Those actual achievemenO their marks
desiring to try out are asked to come IEXTEN) 'tIME ON RESEIRVA-
prepared with a short reading, either 'e intellignce sts show that te TIONS FOR RANQUET
an exractfrom pla or men's a ;bility to learn is greater ins a
an extract from a play or part of a majority of cases despite the contra-
poem. Because of the size of the or- dictory result that women go through Reservations for places at the
ganization, only a limited number of with higher grades Women League Installation banquet
college wt ihrgrds oe
new members will be admitted. which 'will take place from 5:30
tb7 'l-olck Thn a iI

I

Industrial Conditions Among English RIFLE CLUJ
XWomen Undergo Change-Miss Bevington AWARDS TC
_""- :fAt a luncheon las;t
indlustrial conditions among the liug for s11ort periods during th' day. 1"n(111bHrs of thern; m
'nglish-women who work in factories She inaugurated rest periods, dur-'decided on the awarL
,.,ing which the girls have tea. Several
Ire being rapidly changed accordinghrs of the rile t03r
to Miss Shiela flevington, of Lon- Ma-hines were altered so that dan- be frt rifltar
o _who is 'connected with the Na-1 gerou working parts were not expos- the first qualificati)I
to tI Psyoe- e d, and they would be more conven- in the form of a ini
oel n tieof ndtrial t ych o-rs enetly arranged for the worker. Inl be given; for passini
cry o IEnglIand1, and at the present some departments where the work:
ime is making a six-month tour of. silver rifle; for passi
,is tedious setting-up exercises have gol
the United States. ier purpose is to been introducedoldrifle; and for pi
study the working conditions here as ben__ntrodue_._and hiighest, a gold r
relatd to n'sychology. Miss Beving- et ttached.
ton has gone to various factories to ENGLISH STUDEN TS get ad
study the conditions and make 11 1,: J r J ~ n , U Since many of ti e

team

Mary Whie,1'29
Miss White was elected president
of the leading women's dramatic or-
ganizatien Tuesday. She played the
part of Professor Bobs in the Junior
Girls' play and has ben active in
Masques .plays; for several years.
WESTERN COLLEGE
HAS YOUNG WOMEN
California girls start their college
education young, for a survey just
completed at the Universi ly of Cali-
fornia at Los Angeles by the dean of
women, shtows that an eveni dozen 15-
year old girls are enrolled in the uni-
versity, and they are carrying their
college courses successfully in spite
of their lack of years. However, the
girl of nineteen outnumbers all others
on the campus. '

(tnges that will not only help prof-
its, but decrease the fatigue of the
workers.
Hr experiences in one factory in
pa;┬▒icular is a good example of thel
value of ier work. In a celluloid plant
just outside of London she began her
investigation in the buffing depart-
nent where combs and brushes were
finished. Here dust collectors were)
introduced and thte worker's stools
were placed to better advantage.
Miss Bevington says that England
and France use the celluloid collar
rather commonly, and that improve-
ments in this type of industry will
soon spread, she believes, to other
countries.
Another interesting department of
the celluloid industry is the use made
of milk. A product is made from cas-
ein which substitutes for celluloid in
operation was broken up so as to
alternate between standing and sit-

In the Fall of 1923 IMiss Frances
E. Riggs, of -Detroit, as an expression
of her interest in the English Speak-
ing Union and its purpose of foster-
in-g understanding and good will be-
tween Great Britain and the United
States, made an important gift to the
University of Michigan for the per- I
inanent support of fellowships forl
English students specially chosen fori
graduate study. Appointments for one
or more each year are made by thel
Executive Board of the Graduate
School on nomination by a special
British committee of which the Sec-
retary of the English Speaking Union,
with offices at 50 Russell Square,.
London, England, is chairman.
Three women and one man, from,
various parts of England are herel
this year studying under this founda-!
tion.!

will graduate hiis year, an
sequently not have the tiI
the qualifications, it was t
make the following awards
of their excellent work on
squad: to Mary Allshouse,
Benham, Maurine Jones, an
Walsh, will be given the go
three years service on the
Miriam Hosmer and Stelia S
silver pin, for two years' se
to Irene Field, Etruria Dos
Nicholson, and Margaret M
bronze pin, for one year's :
In addition thc followin
will receive W. A. A. honor
firing on tIre rifle team
Maurine Jones, Stella Stu
Allshouse, Miriam tiosmnem
Doster, Margaret Monroe,
Benham, ancl Julia Mottier,
Ifor two semesters' service
cille Walsh and Merle Ranen
for one semester's service.

DELTA ZETA WINS
OVER OPPONENTS
BY SCORE QF 6-3
Delta Zeta played Alpha Zi Delta in
the third round of the Intramural
tournament at 4 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon, and won by a score of 6-3.
The quality of the playing was rather
amateurish, and the game lacked
thrills.

T.;t.n

v

Lineup
Alpha Xi Delta Delta Zeta
M. Goodale.....c.... Norda Beulter
E. Crowe ................. D. Lyons
E. Graham.....1b.... L. Townsend
P. Armstrong ,..2b......... C. Lake
H. Shaw .......3b.... ..N. Bassett
A. Nagelvoort ...ss....... D. NichosI
V. iMead ..I......f...... M. Reading
E. Wassink . ..rf....... D. Boehi .s
.......cf.......K. Backus
Zeta Tau Alpha was scheduled to
play .Zone 6 at four o'clock, but was
forced to default. Gaines were sche-
duled between Kappa Kappa Gammaf
fand Kappa Alpha Theta, and between
Sigma Kappa and Alpha hi Omega.
at five o"clock but all teams failed
to appear ont tiefield.
NOTICE Si
All those who wish to enter the
track meet must sign on the poster
in' Barbour Gymnasium today, as the
list will be taken down th'is after-
noon. All those in the meet should be
out for practice Mopday afternoon
at 4 o'clock at Palmer field.
Announcement was made recently
at ┬░he Kappa Delta house of the en-
gagement of Geraldine Aubrey, '27,
to Russell E. Smith, "27E.
Junior Girls at North*estern are
wearing bright purple caps and
gowns.
Typewriting and

Student Choice Lies
Between Two Fields
"The college student must choose
between mental and physical achieve-
ment," says Dr. William Emerson in
an article printed in the April issue
of the Woman's Home .Companion.
"The man who would excell in men-
tal achievement must sacrifice his
body and the athlete cannot hope for
honors in both the physical and men-
tal fields without danger."
Dr. Emerson thinks that admission
requirements for college entrance
have tended to work in the wrong di-
rection. They keep the highly organ-
ized student at a high rate of nervous
tension without any letdown between
prep and collegg work. A student
whose efforts to meet the high acad-
emit' standards have resulted in loss
of health should be "physically recon-
ditioned" before he is allowed to en-
ter college.
Half of the men and women enter-
ing college are below weight and be-
tween twenty and thirty per . cent
show all of the -symptoms of very poor
health. Any attempt to engage in ex-
added strain which results in fatigue
and inability to concentrate.
Low standards of health and low
health intelligence show their effect
more quickly in college than anywhvlre
else because of the constant drain on
one's reserve forces.
1I

Lu .u 'IC, 1ursu y, ay 1lu
at Barbour gymnasium, may be
made within the next few days.
'Each place is $1. and it is cus-
tomary for groups to attend in a
hody. Reservations and furtheri
information may. be obtained
from Ellen Groff, 5847.b!
_1

Those

New

I.I. !. I I I --.

I

NOW, I M111101

Have Just Arrived

FASHION DICTATES

,,

Chines

Sandi

Foxes, Stone and Baum Martin for Neckwcar.
We are prepared with a full line, including
every shade and design.
At surprisingly low prices.
E TAULISHED 1904 217 E. UE'ER.TY ST.

Don't Fail To

fee

Them

At

if

HARGIS OTR

or

Wuert4 Theatre

I

0

All Ladies Footwear

S 'j

All Men's Footwe

i 3

$6.50

$8.50

For the Week-End

11

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--

ii

SWEETLAND
The House of Quality

Gootinesso

a.
/e-

Hot Lunches

Toasted Sandwiches

11

Mimeographing

Hot Waffles
Refreshments

i

Prompt service. Expericeiced oper-
ators. Moderae rates.
0. D. MORRILL
The Typewriter and
stationery Store.
17 lckebs Arcade Phone C615

212 South Main

....
..

4 A/
N,
4.
4.
{

MAY DRESS SALE,

S.00

and

$ .95 and$n 14
Hundreds of dresses to choose from in
all the Wanted Spring colors and dark
shades includedt, sizes.14 up.
Materials of' Crepe, Georgette, Rajah,
Tub Silk, Satin, printed Georgette and

*,.
r
i.
;,
,-
..;;.
", : =
4
,,,
, ,+I
,
,
r
N
},
1
i

I
hJ
1
E4

one Pound, Two Pounds, Assorted.

I-

I

I

All the most significant new style
notes that distinguish the Summer
1927 are here. We are always irst
to show the newest modes; at prices
that are well within the means of a
limited income. Come in and see how
fascinating our new styles really are.
Afternoon Dresses......$14.75

\,I

11

I

all TQe

Sport Dresses.........
Sport-Coats..........
Satin Coats ......... .
Flannel Coats ........

9.95
19.75
25.00
19.75

(The Pound)

9l

IF.
I5
y gf

-F-

-;
-'
-.Y;
-,..-..
..,_..
..._.
..
..r. ,
--. .
5...
...--

Knitted Dresses

.. 25.00

Also fresh Salted Nut3, 25c Box
and After Dinner Mints, I5c Sack

i

Sleeveless Jackets ... . .
Blazer Jackets ........
Flannel Skirts ........
Tailleur Blouses ...... .
Sports Sweaters.......
Silk Skirts...........

6.95
9.75
6.95
1.98
1.95
10.75
25.00

4
H
W
A
.jai
"s
+7.
ir..
.aa

Crepes.~

I'l

11

11

M~L Aft

Tweed Suits ..

II * I

11 ,

91

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I

(SEC0jND FLOOR) {

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